art.broadwayworld.com

National Gallery Presents BUILDING THE PICTURE: ARCHITECTURE IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE PAINTING, Now thru 9/21

National Gallery Presents BUILDING THE PICTURE: ARCHITECTURE IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE PAINTING, Now thru 9/21

This spring, the National Gallery presents the first exhibition in Britain to explore the role of architecture within painting, and focusses on Italian Renaissance painting of the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries.

Building the Picture: Architecture in Italian Renaissance Painting aims to increase visitors' appreciation and understanding of some of the most beautiful and architectonic paintings by Italian masters such as Duccio, Botticelli, Crivelli and their contemporaries. Visitors will be encouraged to look in new ways at buildings depicted in paintings, and to investigate how artists invented spaces in mind and paint that transcended the reality of bricks, mortar and marble.

With a record-breaking six million visits during 2013, the National Gallery remains committed to researching and showcasing its extraordinarily rich permanent collection. As a result of the research partnership between the National Gallery and the University of York, this exhibition offers a fresh interpretation of some of the National Gallery's own Italian Renaissance collections. In addition, Building the Picture will include the Venetian master Sebastiano del Piombo's The Judgement of Solomon (Kingston Lacy, The Bankes Collection, National Trust), on display in London for the first time in 30 years, and 'The Ruskin Madonna' by Andrea del Verrocchio (National Gallery of Scotland).

In Renaissance Italy, art and architecture were closely interconnected and the boundaries between all the arts were fluid. An important reason for this was that there was no specific educational programme or apprenticeship for architects. The Florentine architect Brunelleschi, for example, trained as a goldsmith, while Michelangelo was a painter and sculptor before he designed buildings. Five short films commissioned to coincide with this exhibition demonstrate how contemporary practitioners and thinkers are again blurring the boundaries between media and forms of practice. The films provide modern perspectives on real and imagined architecture from award-winning Swiss architect Peter Zumthor, film-maker Martha Fiennes, art historian T. J. Clark, film historian John David Rhodes and computer game cinematic director Peter Gornstein.

Caroline Campbell, Curator of Italian Paintings before 1500, said: "This exhibition provides a wonderful opportunity to think about how pictures can achieve an architectural sort of beauty. We can look beyond perspective to appreciate the imagined and fantastical spaces created by architecture. And the sense of mass, scale and three-dimensionality introduced by buildings changes the balance and feel of a painting."


Become a Fan, Follower & Subscriber

FROM THE EDITOR
BWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street MuralBWW Reviews: The Bronx Museum, Sze It Now and Burcaw's Street Mural
by Barry Kostrinsky