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The Glass Academy Presents Live Glassblowing With Eggs

'Glass eggstravaganza' was hatched from the vision of Artist Michelle Plucinsky. She explains, "The glass eggs are a perfect start for any collection, and for those new to our studio, it's a great show to watch how they are made with molten glass and fire all around."

"Absolutely charming in a retro sort of way!" exclaims Melissa Byle, the gallery coordinator. "Glassy Chicks are a studio original sculpture of a blown glass bird with a '50s Italian look. All very bright and colorful, some have metal legs attached and they vary in sizes with each having its own character and qualities. You'll find yourself just drawn to them to find the one that represents you the best!"

Each item at the show is individually hand sculpted using traditional glass crafting techniques and the studio's Master glassblowers will be performing live during the show to take custom orders. "The fact that you can custom design work and see it made in front of your eyes is spectacular! It's such a thrill that a business still does something handmade like this!" comments Jennifer Giering, a local glass collector.

Be sure to come early to get the best pick of eggs for your basket along with nests and birds for your shelves. Quantities are limited. Pricing starting at $25 for the small eggs with custom orders accepted, Visa and MasterCard honored. This is an all ages, free parking show.

About the Glass Academy
The Glass Academy is a 14,000 square foot working studio used for private and public events that teach about the glass arts thru educational tours, demonstrations, and classes. The studio features a gallery, large demo space, classroom bays, and free secure parking. It is also the corporate office for Furnace Design Studio and the Royal Glassmakers.

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