Indianapolis Museum Presents THE CONSTANT WRESTLER: TOYIN ODUTOLA and THE HIGHWAYMEN, 12/6-1/25

December 6-January 25
Opening reception December 6, 6-11 pm

Artist Talk with Toyin Odutola facilitated by Malina Simone Jeffers of Mosaic City, December 7, 1 pm

Toyin Odutola's pieces evoke a multitude of feelings, like ones you might experience when looking at an actual person. Although her work mainly features characters rendered in black ink, their appeal is universal. Odutola's work addresses issues of identity, and stand as a beacon in the storm of the human experience.

This exhibit was made possible through a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (Wynn Kramarsky Freedom of Artistic Expression Grant).

All our programs and exhibitions are made possible with support from The Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts (Wynn Kramarsky Freedom of Artistic Expression Grant), The Christel Dehaan Family Foundation, The Glick Fund, The Efroymson Family Fund, Halstead Architects, KEJ Foundation, the Indianapolis Foundation, The Tracy L. Haddad Foundation, The Netherleigh Fund, the Arts Council of Indianapolis, the Murphy Arts L.L.C., Penrod Foundation, and Big Car Art + Design.

December 6-January 25

Opening reception December 6, 6-11 pm

The Highwaymen, also referred to as the Florida Highwaymen, are a group of 26 African American landscape artists in Florida. Self-taught and self-mentoring, they created a body of work of over 200,000 paintings, despite facing many racial and cultural barriers. Mostly from the Fort Pierce area, they paintedlandscapes and made a living selling them door-to-door to businesses and individuals throughout Florida from the mid-1950s through the 1980s.


Their success and longevity is remarkable considering they began their career in the racially unsettled and violent times of the 50s in Florida and amid the social conditions of the Jim Crow South where the stirrings of the civil rights movement were only just beginning. They have been called "The Last Great American Art Movement of the 20th century".

Made possible through a grant from the Efroymson Family Fund.




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