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The Dallas Opera and Dallas Holocaust Museum Present KORNGOLD, THE LOST COMPOSER?, 2/25

The Dallas Opera and Dallas Holocaust Museum Present KORNGOLD, THE LOST COMPOSER?, 2/25

The Dallas Opera and Dallas Holocaust Museum are the proud partners of what promises to be an extraordinary panel discussion on the life, the work and the legacy of exiled twentieth-century composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold, who went from Viennese "wunderkind" to one of the founding fathers of the "Great American Film Score," when the Nazi conquest of Europe made it impossible for him to return home.

"Korngold, the Lost Composer?" is a discussion designed to uncover the inner life and dangerous times of the former child prodigy (often compared to Mozart); the forced exodus of composers, musicians and other artists whose work was labeled "degenerate" by the Nazis, as well as those hounded and oppressed by the regime for the unpardonable "crime" of being Jewish. This enlightening discussion, slated to take place on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. in Zale Auditorium, The Aaron Family Jewish Community Center located at 7900 Northaven Rd., Dallas, TX 75230, features an all-star lineup:

· Cantor Richard Cohn, Temple Emanu-El

· Dr. Timothy Jackson, Professor of Music Theory, the University of North Texas

· Barton Weiss, Associate Professor of Film/Video, University of Texas at Arlington and Founder of "3 Stars Jewish Cinema"

· Keith Cerny, General Director and CEO of The Dallas Opera

The panel will consider the impact of the Nazi threat on classical music in both Europe and Hollywood, as well as the tremendous loss of life and talent in the Holocaust which echoes down to the present day.

Admission is just $5 per person (cash only at the door), parking is free and reservations are recommended at rsvp@dallasholocaustmuseum.org.


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