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McGuire Furniture Collaborates With Jordan Betten for Works of Art

McGuire Furniture has collaborated with artist Jordan Betten of Lost Art to create a one of a kind works of art. Taking five of McGuire's most iconic chairs, he re- envisioned them with a rock and roll vibe - as he does for his fashion clients. They will be on display at McGuire San Francisco for the month of February and Baker Knapp & Tubbs' Los Angeles showroom in March.

Since 1948, McGuire has been internationally known for creating timeless furniture of natural materials. Each piece of furniture is crafted by trained artisans who bend, weave and form every chair, table or accessory by hand. Says McGuire President Kendra Reichenau, "Jordan's work is incredibly creative, and he has envisioned some of our classic chairs in an entirely new way. He uses only the finest materials and fine tuned hand-craftsmanship - two qualities we very much admire."

Jordan Betten is a New York City based artist and the founder of Lost Art. Lost Art, a luxury leather brand, began in 1997 with the creation of a bag called "The Road". Since the beginning of Lost Art, all pieces have been made entirely by hand, in the tradition of the finest craftsmanship and attention to detail. The Lost Art collection includes clothing, accessories, motorcycles, instruments and guitar cases. Collectors include Lenny Kravitz, Steven Tyler, Sean Lennon, Sheryl Crow and many others. Betten's collection can be viewed at the Lost Art gallery in West Chelsea, Manhattan, and his murals are easily recognizable on walls around the world. http://lostartnyc.com

"Knowing that McGuire continues to produce hand-crafted furniture was the best reason to collaborate. Our company's aesthetics may be very different, but our shared sensibilities of paying attention to detail and the respect for the materials created an organic connection," says Betten.


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