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WICKED's Elphaba Costume Inducted into the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

WICKED's Elphaba Costume Inducted into the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

In a historic ceremony on Monday, December 17th, the blockbuster musical Wicked's iconic Elphaba costume, hat and broom were inducted into the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Tony Award-winning costume designer Susan Hilferty was on hand to sign the deed of gift as well as Broadway cast members Donna Vivino and Tiffany Haas who sang a selection of song from Wicked to commemorate this significant event. The costume elements will join objects from the musicals King and I, Rent and The Lion King in the museum's permanent entertainment collections.

"Hilferty's designs bring the story of the witches of Oz prior to Dorothy's arrival, to life," said Marc Pachter, acting director of the museum. "This donation is a significant addition to the museum's entertainment collection and shows the enduring cultural contribution of Broadway hits to American life."

Designed by Tony Award-winning costume designer Susan Hilferty, the costume components were originally made for Mandy Gonzalez who played Elphaba from March 2010 - January 2011.

The costume is currently on display in the "American Stories" exhibition which showcases historic and cultural touchstones of American history through more than 100 objects from the museum's vast holdings.

The Wicked objects join a rich collection of museum artifacts with Broadway origins, including costumes from the Broadway productions of Hello, Dolly!, The Lion King, Cats, Fiddler on the Roof, This Is the Army, Kiss of the Spider Woman, Mame and Lorelei; theater awards, including three Tony Awards; props from the off Broadway musical The Fantasticks; Rose Marie's copy of the musical score of Top Banana; and numerous Broadway playbills and posters. The museum's Archives Center also has a number of other theatrical scripts, video and audiotapes in its Luther Davis Collection.

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