BWW Review: The Truly Innovative Dances of Charlotte Ballet's INNOVATIVE WORKS Are Mesmerizing

BWW Review: The Truly Innovative Dances of Charlotte Ballet's INNOVATIVE WORKS Are Mesmerizing

What I especially love about Hope Muir's first season as artistic director of Charlotte Ballet is the new blood she has infused into the choreography, bringing works by Javier De Frutos and Johan Inger to the city for the first time. So it was with considerable excitement that I went to see the 2018 edition of INNOVATIVE WORKS, premiering pieces by Myles Thatcher and Robyn Mineko Williams, choreographers we haven't seen here before.

Staged at the McBride-Bonnefoux Center for Dance, where INNOVATIVE runs through February 17, both of these new imports triumphed - not only with their bold concepts but in the bravura performances that brought them to life. In between, however, we were subjected to the premiere of "The Weight of Darkness," a lugubrious and monochromatic work by Sasha Janes that struck me as more inert than innovative. Murky lighting by Burke Brown and all-black costume designs by Aimee j. Coleman didn't perk things up.

Usually, we can count on Janes to engage us with the sensuous, lyrical, and romantic elements of his work, often with a soupcon of eroticism. But here, commissioned by Angela and Robert McGahan to memorialize Angela's sister, Irene Ross, Janes goes astray outside his comfort zone. Instead of celebrating Irene's life, he uses the idea that 4am is the "death hour" as the starting point for his five-part broodings. Of course, the music he has chosen by Nico Muhly and Max Richter is neither uptempo nor uplifting.

Chelsea Dumas and Ben Ingel were an attractive couple in the first pas de deux that Janes created for this piece, and the pair of Alexandra Ball James and Josh Hall brought their nonpareil elegance to the second. Trouble was, there was nothing I haven't seen before in the sequences of ballet moves that Janes doled out to these couples and nothing I'd clamor to see again. In the segments that framed the piece, the four couples of the ensemble only multiplied the tedium.

BWW Review: The Truly Innovative Dances of Charlotte Ballet's INNOVATIVE WORKS Are Mesmerizing

Perhaps "The Weight of Darkness" wouldn't have seemed like such a thudding bore if Williams' "To Clear" hadn't been so utterly fresh and original. The language of dance movements and the vocabulary of the dancers' interactions were both striking and new. At the heart of the asymmetrical structure Amelia Sturt-Dilley personified the angularity, restlessness, and urgency of Williams' concept, appearing at the outset in the most outré of Coleman's defiantly drab and casual costume designs.

When we first notice Sturt-Dilley perched on a chair, we're not sure if she's cautiously settling into it or getting set to flee in terror. Six other dancers, less vividly characterized, ride the wave of the original music score composed by Robert F. Haynes and Tony Lazzera. You might find their synthesis of organic flow with the mechanized pulsations of machines and hip-hop to be a little disconcerting. Fused with the unnatural, yet irresistibly fluid and rhythmic movement of the dancers, it's just as likely that you will find it mesmerizing and utterly persuasive.

This is who we are, what we've become. That's a strange takeaway from a piece that Williams says started with a thoughtful Bryan Ferry-styled contemplation of a woman, but something else in the choreographer's filmed intro strikes closer to home. The close, not-quite-connecting interactions between the dancers always seem to deflect them in directions they had not anticipated taking. Totally involving and fascinating.

Concluding the program, Myles Thatcher's "Redbird" remains abstract, but with Sarah Lapointe brilliantly dancing the title role, there are tantalizing suggestions of a storyline. Coleman dresses Lapointe in a bright red blouse - plus red hoodie, completing the cardinal evocation - that distinguishes her from the other seven dancers until the end when she sheds this plumage. In his intro, Thatcher shares that his choreography was a reaction to "a loss," a way of processing grief.

Lanterns solemnly brought forth by the other dancers toward the conclusion of the piece may be signaling empathy, so when the redbird sheds her plumage, it's quite possible she's accepting their consolation and returning to the fold - and to what she looked like before she was aggrieved. Yet as Lapointe lets herself be absorbed into the group, in a gorgeous ritualistic tableau, there's no telling for sure whether she has been consoled or coerced. Her outsider color may be unacceptable to the others. Or perhaps it is acceptable for a period of time mysteriously established by tradition.

The process may not work perfectly, but there's comfort in knowing that you and your tribe are honoring it. And maybe an echo of the agony lingers.

Photo Credit: Jeff Cravotta




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From This Author Perry Tannenbaum

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