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Photoville Festival Expands Across All Five Boroughs For 2020 Edition

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New York's free premiere photo destination returns with 60+ exhibitions in over 25 outdoor locations.

Photoville Festival Expands Across All Five Boroughs For 2020 Edition

Brooklyn-based non-profit Photoville (co-founded by Laura Roumanos, Sam Barzilay, and Dave Shelley; formerly United Photo Industries) announces Photoville NYC 2020, the ninth year of the festival celebrating and showcasing photographers and organizations from New York and around the world, and adapting to the current climate with hope, enthusiasm, and photography in public spaces.

Photoville NYC 2020 expands the beloved festival, for the first time ever, to all five boroughs, offering increased access to art and storytelling as so many facets of society remain on pause, and as New York's open public spaces provide vital, safe ways of being out in the world amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. To give viewers as much time as possible to experience upwards of 60 exhibitions in 30 outdoor locations-while simultaneously safeguarding against overcrowding-the festival will run for two months rather than its usual two weeks, from September 17-November 29, 2020.

While Photoville continues to fill Brooklyn Bridge Park with diverse photographic visions, new locations cover the city, from Times Square (Manhattan) to Soundview Park (The Bronx) to South Beach Promenade (Staten Island) and Astoria Park (Queens).With Photoville's focus on the power of visual storytelling, many exhibitions respond to and candidly capture realities both intimate and global from this historic, harrowing year. (See below for a full list of exhibitions.) Photoville NYC is open to the public-all ages, and all pets included-free of charge, making it unlike any other photo festival in the world.

Photoville has, every year, offered a public of nearly 100,000 people engagement with the work of over 600 photographers at various stages in their careers, giving these exciting artists large-scale exposure. As many organizations are pivoting and reimagining themselves to meet this particular moment, Photoville further nurtures and grows what it's done from the very beginning: marry the beauty and importance of New York's outdoor public spaces with free, captivating photographic exhibitions and cultural experiences.

As the festival approached its 10th anniversary (in 2021), its creators had already begun to brainstorm how-in order to truly be an all-inclusive destination for the city-they could expand to all five boroughs. When the pandemic hit, however, they realized this expansion would be all the more resonant to New Yorkers now, with so many of our means of experiencing art placed on hold. Photoville co-founder Laura Roumanos says, "New Yorkers are using public spaces more than ever right now. While we were stuck at home, escaping our apartments for a brief period each day to go to a park was all we had. Parks have become an even more crucial place for people to unwind and relax, and we thought, 'what a perfect opportunity to engage our communities with stories from around the world.' And since not everyone can travel out to Brooklyn Bridge Park, we thought we'd also bring the stories to them."

"We are proud to partner with Photoville for the 9th season to bring fabulous photography exhibits to the Park, free of charge," said Eric Landau, President of Brooklyn Bridge Park. "During the pandemic parks have proved to be more important than ever, and Photoville has done an amazing job of bringing art, culture, and important storytelling to New Yorkers in a way that is safe for the current times. Though Photoville will be different this year, we are thrilled that it will utilize more of the Park, as well as expand into all five boroughs. Congratulations to Laura, Sam, and Dave."

Immersion and interactivity have always been at the heart of Photoville's success and popularity, allowing it to become the largest annual photographic event in New York City and among the most­ attended photographic events nationwide. This year, as Photoville creatively considers the necessary limits of our moment, the organization has put together an abundant calendar of virtual events surrounding the festival, including artist talks, workshops, demonstrations, educational programs, storytelling events, and community programming. These online offerings also include Photoville Education Day 2020, which will take place throughout the month of October, as a series of education programs for young people and educators. These include Meet the Artist Exhibition Tours, in which students connect with Photoville artists, Youth Photography Panels, in which students learn from their peers, and an Educators Lab, where teachers connect with Photoville artists and collaborate on lesson plans based on their work.

Working with more than 70 curatorial and programming partners, Photoville NYC 2020 exhibits work by more than 260 visual artists. This year's exhibitions include Pandemic Class of 2020, Elias Williams' work highlighting New York City's spring graduates and their diverse experiences at the height of the pandemic, presented by Times Square Arts and Photoville; Asian Americans on Race and The Pandemic, Haruka Sakaguchi's documentation of the stories of ten New York-based Asian Americans who share their experiences of racism during the pandemic, presented by TIME; Bronx Wrestling, Sofie Vasquez's black and white documentary series about the independent wrestling scene and culture happening in the South Bronx; In Our Season of Discontent, Count it All Joy, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture dives into their archive and are curating an exhibition inspired by Ross Gay's poem A Small Needful Fact and Stevie Wonder's album Journey Through The Secret Life of Plants which will be on display in two Harlem parks - St. Nicholas Park and Jackie Robinson Park; Flamingo Bob, Jasper Doest's chronicles of the life of Bob, a rescued flamingo and emissary for conservation on the Dutch Caribbean island of Curaçao, presented by National Geographic; La Vida en Loisaida (Life on the Lower East Side), Destiny Mata's portraits of longtime residents of the rapidly-gentrifying Lower East Side, presented by Abrons Art Center; New Work - Standing Strong Project, an ongoing, multimedia, and community-based project that aims to uplift Indigenous peoples in reclaiming their narrative by creating a safe space to make their own image; Q100, Salvador Espinoza's photographs from the bus line that's the only method of public transportation to and from Rikers Island; Sources of Self Regard, a collection of self-portraits by Black photographers, offering an intimate perspective from artists motivated by their own reality, presented by The New York Times; Teaching Creativity: A Case for Art Education, emphasizing the importance of the arts in all NYC public schools, with works by students and educators, presented by the New York City Department of Education Middle and High School Educators; Trump Revolution: Climate Crisis, presented by Bronx Documentary Center, and documenting the current president's overturning of decades of American environmental policy; We, Women, a preview of a traveling, nationwide exhibit (coming in 2021) in which women and nonbinary artists examine critical issues across the U.S. through photo-based community engagement projects; and more.

The exhibitions will be accompanied by live and on-demand programming online for photo-lovers of all ages. Panel discussions will give added depth to many of these exhibitions, with artists and industry leaders addressing some of the most compelling topics and photo stories of the moment. An Evening With The New York Times will feature discussions with the talent behind some of The New York Times' most engaging stories of the year; Asian Americans Reflect on Seeing Themselves, Race, and the Pandemic from TIME, will feature photographer Haruka Sakaguchi speaking to the subjects of her project on New York-based Asian Americans' experiences of racism during the pandemic; Everyday Projects will host a discussion of photographers from around the world reflecting on their Then and Now project, which captures the changes of this global moment; ICP Curator-At-Large Isolde Brielmaier will lead a conversation with young Black imagemakers on the past, present, and future that they envision for visual culture, issues of representation, and socio-political impact in Then, Now, Next; photographers Destiny Mata and Gogy Esparza will discuss their artistic practices and the role New York City plays in shaping their aesthetic perspectives in We Built This City, a discussion moderated by Abrons Arts Center's Director of Programming Ali Rosa-Salas; Photography, History, and Systems of Power, a conversation hosted by The Photo Bill of Rights, will feature writers, historians, and photographers who use their work to examine visual culture, including author and educator John Edwin Mason, looking back at the origins of photography - how it has been used as a tool of colonialism and how this legacy still appears today, both culturally and institutionally; and many others.

Interactive and on-demand workshops will give attendees opportunities to advance their skills with some of the photo community's premiere organizations, while pre-recorded activities will provide photo-fun for the whole family! Adobe will host a series of workshops for photographers looking to expand their skill-sets using Adobe's industry-leading software; Tabletop and Prop Stylist Robin Zachary will lead Styling Beyond Instagram, a discussion of opportunities and ways to get into the exciting Prop Styling business; and many more. Available starting Sept. 17, on-demand programming will include a pre-recorded Online Cyanotype Demonstration from Penumbra Foundation, for photographers and families looking to delve into the cyanotype process; Make-Your-Own Container Exhibition and Make-Your-Own Camera guides will be available from Photoville; and other family-friendly activities including a PhotoBooth from PhotoWings and many more.

Additionally, there will be focused professional development opportunities hosted by Diversify Photo and the Visual Thinking Collective. Returning from last year is the popular Freelance Safety Clinic hosted by the Committee to Protect Journalists and ACOS Alliance, which provides expert, one-to-one advice on safety, risk assessment, digital security and trauma management.

Online programming will run September 17 through October, and the full schedule and programming details for virtual talks, workshops, and activities will be announced on September 4, 2020 via photoville.nyc

Photoville NYC 2020 is produced by Photoville and made possible with the support of founding partners Brooklyn Bridge Park and Two Trees Management; Marquee partners NYC Parks, Leica Camera, PhotoWings, Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, DUMBO Business Improvement District; Official transportation partner New York Ferry and Major Community Partners, Times Square Arts, Adobe, Dutch Culture USA, Abrons Art Center, St. Ann's Warehouse; online programming partner the Phillip and Edith Leonian Foundation, and Education Day partner PhotoWings.

Photoville NYC Locations and Hours

All public exhibitions are in open spaces and will be on view 24/7

Brooklyn

  • Brooklyn Bridge Park (334 Furman St, Brooklyn, NY 11201)
  • Washington Street and Old Fulton Road, DUMBO NY 11201

Manhattan

  • Times Square (Broadway and 7th Ave, New York, NY 10036)
  • Chelsea Park (West 27th Street and 9th Ave, New York, NY 10001)
  • Abrons Art Center (466 Grand St, New York, NY 10002)
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Community Park (Montgomery St and Henry St, New York, NY 10002)
  • JOBS PLUS (24 Avenue D E. 3rd St, New York, NY 10009)
  • BGR (888 E 6th St, New York, NY 10009)
  • St. Nicholas Park (St Nicholas Ave and St Nicholas Terrace, New York, NY 10030)
  • Jackie Robinson Park (Bradhurst Ave and Edgecombe Ave, W 145 St, New York, NY 10031)

Staten Island

  • South Beach Promenade (656 Father Capodanno Blvd., Staten Island, NY 10305)

The Bronx

  • Soundview Park (Lafayette Ave. & Metcalf Ave.Bronx NY 10473)
  • Van Cortlandt Park (5930 Broadway, Bronx, NY 10471)

Queens

  • Astoria Park (19th St. & 24 Ave., Astoria, NY 11105)
  • Travers Park (76-9 34th Ave, Jackson Heights, NY 11372)

For further details about hours of operations for each location, please refer to our website photoville.nyc.

Exhibitions Include:

  • ABC Corona (Presented by Photoville) Featuring a collaborative work by Marvi Lacar and Ben Lowy. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • A Mother's Eye (Presented by Photoville) features photographs of children made by their mothers. Elinor Carucci, Siân Davey, Adama Delphine Fawundu, Donna Ferrato, Marvi Lacar, Stephanie Sinclair, Florencia Trincheri, and Annie Hsiao-Ching Wang uncover the moments that become family memories, narratives of growing up. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Asian Americans on Race and The Pandemic (Photographed by Haruka Sakaguchi and Presented by TIME) Ten New York-based Asian Americans reflect on racism during the coronavirus pandemic and the need for equality. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Blackness Is (Photographed by Kevin Claiborne and Presented by Photoville) seeks to highlight and challenge nuanced ideas of Black identity through the presentation of questions blended with landscape scenes of a desert, an environment known to be oppressive towards human life. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park
  • Bronx Wrestling (Photographed by Sofie Vasquez and Presented by Photoville and NYC Parks), is a black and white documentary series by Sofie Vasquez about the independent wrestling scene and culture happening in the South Bronx. On view in the Bronx at Soundview Park.
  • Can We Talk? (Presented by Abrons Arts Center and Photoville), Capturing the perspectives and experiences of inner-city, east coast, and Latinx-American lives and their rituals, Gogy Esparza's "Can We Talk", reflects on the romance and hyperbole embedded in everyday symbols. On view in the Lower East Side, (Manhattan) at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Park.
  • Capture The Moment (Presented by Duggal Visual Solutions), For Duggal's "Capture the Moment 2020" Photo Contest, we asked visual storytellers across North America to submit a photo of one captured moment. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • In Our Season of Discontent, Count it All Joy (Presented by Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and NYC Parks) The exhibition is inspired by Ross Gay's poem A Small Needful Fact and Stevie Wonder's albumJourney Through The Secret Life of Plants, curated from the Schomburg's archival collections and events. On view in Harlem (Manhattan) at both St. Nicholas Park and Jackie Robinson Park.
  • Cheering on the Border (Photographed by Sara Naomi Lewkowicz and Presented by Photoville) is a story of the border, not as a boundary, but as a region, and how life in that region is experienced by a specific group of high school cheerleaders. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Climate Archive (Photographed by Suzette Bousema and Presented by Dutch Culture USA) explores ancient ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland, as a visual representation and future prediction of climate change. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Constructing Equality (Photographed by Roshni Khatri and Presented by Photoville and NYC Parks) The trailblazing women photographed for this project are bringing change to the construction industry of New York. They are building the future of the construction trades. On view in Midtown Manhattan at Chelsea Park.
  • Die lewe is nie reg vir my nie (This is not the right life for me) (Presented by Melkweg and Dutch Culture USA) Gangsterism in Schauderville was constructed during the apartheid era. Although apartheid is abolished, the trauma that emerged from years of oppression is still alive. This exhibit by Farren van Wyk exemplifies a humane representation of a community, trying not to let the past, nor the stereotypes, define them. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Donning and Doffing (Photographed by Rosem Morton and Presented by Photoville) Gangsterism in Schauderville was constructed during the apartheid era. Although apartheid is abolished, the trauma that emerged from years of oppression is still alive. This work exemplifies a humane representation of a community, trying not to let the past, nor the stereotypes, define them. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Encounters (Presented by Alice Austen House) A personal approach to street photography by Staten Island-based artist Olga Ginzburg. On view in Staten Island at the South Beach Promenade.
  • Flamingo Bob (Presented by National Geographic and NYC Parks) Photographer Jasper Doest chronicles the life of Flamingo Bob, a celebrity on the Dutch Caribbean island of Curaçao, where he acts as an emissary for conservation and protecting nature. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Frontlines In Focus (Presented by Magnum Foundation) From Bangladeshi garment factories to Portland's Black Lives Matter protests, from Algeria's streets to Hong Kong's universities, Frontlines In Focus, highlights the uprisings shaking our world this year and the independent image-makers, Abdo Shanan, Billy H.C. Kwok, Josué Rivas, Katie Orlinksy, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, Taslima Akhter, whose roles are especially vital, during this time of collective isolation. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Haiti to Hood (Presented by Haiti Cultural Exchange) By constructing sets of intimate living spaces, and positioning both Black and Haitian Americans in these re-imagined realities, Daveed Baptiste examines the social dynamics within Haitian-American identity. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Healing Justice Practitioners (Photographed by Nina Robinson and Presented by Photoville) Photographer Nina Robinson recently, spent time with local community organizers, healing justice practitioners, and activists in Minneapolis, Minnesota, who spoke about their rituals of practice, and their thoughts and feelings about the global uprising-while supporting communities on the front lines of this social metamorphosis-because they know firsthand what is possible when new visions are birthed in the midst of crisis. Showing up is not what they do, but who they are, 24/7. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Here. Still. (Photographed by George Nobechi and Presented by Photoville) A contemplative, inner journey of photographs, made from looking out of windows and seeking a sense of connection, longing for the warmth of humanity. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Home Away From Home (Presented by Alice Austen House and NYC Parks) Documentary photographs of Staten Island's north shore neighborhood by Stephen Obisanya. On view in Staten Island at South Beach Promenade.
  • I am Because We Are (Presented by VII Photo and Dutch Culture USA) With a higher proportion of the Dutch population finding co-living as a solution to the rising cost of living, providing elder-care, living sustainably, and coping with loneliness. Ilvy Njiokiktjien explores these alternative options that have become more available, and diverse. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • ICP at THE POINT: Eyes of Hope (Presented by the International Center of Photography, The Point, and NYC Parks) An exhibition of photographs by students from ICP at THE POINT, a program based in the South Bronx.On view in the Bronx at Van Cortlandt Park.
  • In Our Season of Discontent, Count it All Joy (Presented by Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and NYC Parks) The exhibition is inspired by Ross Gay's poem "A Small Needful Fact" and Stevie Wonder's album "Journey Through The Secret Life of Plants", curated from the Schomburg's archival collections and events. On view in Harlem (Manhattan) at St. Nicholas Park and Jackie Robinson Park.
  • La Vida en Loisaida (Life on the Lower East Side) (Presented by Abrons Art Center and Photoville) Taken between 2009 and 2020, Destiny Mata, images, amplify the pride of longtime LES residents, in the wake of the neighborhood's rapid and difficult changes. On view in the Lower East Side (Manhattan).
  • Leica Women Grant (Presented by Leica) explores the works of the 2019 recipients from the inaugural Leica Women Foto Project award. The exhibiting artists include Debi Cornwall, Yana Paskova and Eva Woolridge whose work highlight today's social and political climate through the female perspective. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Liam's World (Photographed by Erin Lefevre and Presented by Photoville) A photographer began photographing her brother to better understand him as a person on the autism spectrum. The project blossomed into collaboration when he started to narrate his own story. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Love Does Not Have Borders 2019 (El Amor No Tiene Fronteras 2019) (Presented by Queens Museum) is an artistic and political project of BordeAndo, a crochet and embroidery collective made up of immigrant women in Queens, NY. The project reflects on the injustice faced by immigrants enduring family separations along the US border. On view in Astoria (Queens) at Astoria Park.
  • Mama's Babies (Photographed by Adrian Burrell, Curated by James Estrin, and Presented by Photoville and NYC Parks) takes a look at migration from sharecropping farms in Louisiana, to Oakland, California through the lens of Adrian Burrell's family. On view in DUMBO on Old Fulton Street.
  • Mott Haven (Photographed by Roy Baizan, Curated by James Estrin, and Presented by Photoville and NYC Parks) A neighborhood in the South Bronx made up of residential houses, NYCHA Projects and an industrial waterfront, currently finds itself as ground zero for the gentrification of the Bronx.This project documents the people, landscapes, and stories of those who are seeing the transition of their neighborhood. On view in DUMBO on Old Fulton Street..
  • New York University Tisch School of the Arts Department of Photography & Imaging Class of 2020 (Presented by New York University Tisch School of the Arts Department of Photography & Imaging) Selected works by the 23 graduating seniors from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts Photography & Imaging BFA class of 2020, addressing issues of climate change, identity, cultural heritage, borders, adoption, alienation, visuality, labor, and more. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Pandemic Class of 2020 (Photographed by Elias Williams and Presented by Photoville and Times Square Arts) New York City's Spring 2020 graduates, from pre-k to medical school, talk about having their traditional commencement ceremonies altered and their experiences in quarantine, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. On view in Midtown Manhattan in Times Square.
  • Picking Up NYC (Presented by Foundation for New York's Strongest) Charlie Eisenbach, Michael Anton, and Andrea Booher, with various artists and works from the City of New York Department of Sanitation archives. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Places of Inspiration (EmeraldX presents: The 30: New and Emerging Photographers to Watch) highlights photographic work created by Andrea Hernandez Briceño, Michelle Groskopf, Shawn Theodore, Kiliii Yüyan, in places and spaces that are meaningful to them in their creative and personal lives, which can often be one and the same. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Portrait of Grief (Presented by National Geographic and NYC Parks) Wayne Lawrence's collaborative portraits of loss remove abstraction and remind us that every life lost during this pandemic is profound and deeply personal. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) on Washington Street.
  • Promises Written On The Ice, Left In The Sun (Presented by the Tim Hetherington Trust) This exhibit by Kiana Hayeri is an introduction and tribute to several women in Afghanistan, each of whom has achieved a level of recognition, and has paid a price for breaking from the crowd. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Q100 (Presented by Queens Museum and NYC Parks) Q100 was photographed by Salvador Espinoza during 2016. The only method of public transportation to and from Rikers Island, the Q100 bus originates in his hometown neighborhood of Long Island City. On view in Astoria (Queens) at Astoria Park.
  • Redefining Beauty (Presented by National Geographic and NYC Parks) Beauty standards are at once a celebration of femininity, and an agent of conformity. Around the world, technology and social media have put the power to define beauty in the hands of the people. Photographer Hannah Reyes Morales explores the current expansive moment where everyone is beautiful. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) on Washington Street.
  • Seeds of Resistance (Presented by Pulitzer Center) by Pablo Albarenga showcases portraits of traditional peoples of the Amazon, and their sacred territories. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Single Mothers by Choice (Presented by The New York Times presents NYT Parenting) photographer Jackie Malloy documents four women as they struggle to get pregnant, navigate the adoption and foster-care systems, and juggle a new life with children-all on their own. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Sources of Self-Regard: Self-Portraits From Black Photographers Reflecting on America (Presented by The New York Times) In early June, The New York Times asked Michelle V. Agins, Miranda Barnes, Erik Carter, Kennedi Carter, Ike Edeani, Rahim Fortune, Texas Isaiah, Nitashia Johnson, Brad Ogbonna, Dana Scruggs, Gioncarlo Valentine, Andre D. Wagner, Jim Wilson to create self-portraits, whatever that phrase meant to them. This collection of those photos presents an intimate perspective from Black artists who are motivated by their own reality. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) on Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Surrounds (Presented by Photography Department of Shanghai Normal University) A showcase of recent work from Yijia FENG, Xinyu WANG, Yirui WU, Jiahui XU, Yiqing ZHU, students of the Department of Photography/Advertising at Film-Television and Communication College of Shanghai Normal University. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Teaching Creativity: A Case for Art Education (Presented by NYC DOE Public Middle and High Schools) We wish to highlight the work of the New York City Department of Education arts educators. By exhibiting our student's works, we hope to add to the conversation on education policy, and shout out that: Art education is necessary right for all students! On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • The Far-reaching Fallout from COVID-19 (Presented by United Nations Development Programme) The world faces an unprecedented threat from COVID-19. It is more than a global health crisis-it is a socio-economic crisis that has exacerbated existing inequalities and created new inequalities that are hitting the most vulnerable people the hardest. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • The Great Empty (Presented by The New York Times) Over the course of a few days in March, The New York Times sent out dozens of photographers around the world to capture images of once-bustling public plazas, beaches, fairgrounds, and more. The photographs tell a similar story: emptiness proliferates like the virus. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • The Lit Lit: Photographers to Watch, Exhibit, & Hire (Presented by Authority Collective) The Lit List-a merit-based list of 25 photographers to watch, exhibit, and hire-is committed to recognizing the outstanding work of womxn, non-binary, transgender, or gender-expansive people of color, and artists, who have been otherwise under-supported or under-resourced, by the visual media industry.. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • The Museum of the Old Colony (Photographed by Pablo Delano and Presented by Photoville) A conceptual art installation created by Pablo Delano that examines the fraught relationship between the U.S., and its modern-day colony Puerto Rico, through the use of appropriated historical imagery and objects. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • The Power Of Telling Your Own Story (Presented by Standing Strong Project) An ongoing, multimedia, and community-based project featuring the work of Andrea Garcia, Joey Montoya, Kelli Moody, Cheyenne Phoenix, Paul Wilson, Ernesto Yerena, Isabella Zizi, that aims to uplift Indigenous peoples in reclaiming their narrative by creating a safe space to make their own image. On view in DUMBO, Brooklyn at Brooklyn Bridge Park. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Thesis, Interrupted (Presented by School of Visual Arts Masters in Digital Photography Program ) Explores the evolution of the School of Visual Arts Masters in Digital Photography class of 2020's thesis projects, during the pandemic and subsequent quarantine.On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Trump Revolution: Climate Crisis (Presented by Bronx Documentary Center) Through photos, words, and multimedia, Yuri Kozyrev, Stacy Kranitz, Katie Orlinsky, Bryan Thomas, Kadir van Lohuizen, Marcus Yam document the current president's overturning of decades of American environmental policy, and its profound effects on American society, and our planet at large. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Turbulence (Presented by Tokyo Institute of Photography, Photoville, and NYC Parks) A showcase of the winners of the 7th Edition of the Tokyo International Photography Competition. On view in DUMBO on Old Fulton Street.
  • Um-basax-bilua (Where They Make the Noise)1904-2016, 2017 (Presented by Aperture) A visual record of found and personal photographs and cultural memorabilia, Wendy Red Star's Um-basax-bilua (Where They Make the Noise) summarizes the century-long history of the Crow Fair and examines the cultural shift from colonial forced assimilation to cultural reclamation. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Underwater Wildlife New York (Presented by New York Aquarium/Wildlife Conservation Society) An underwater photo journey by Keith Ellenbogen of the amazing marine wildlife at home in the waters of New York. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • VALUE: In terms of Iconograph (Presented by Mz. Icar) The Mz. Icar collective and Erin Patrice O'Brien have teamed up to explore value in terms of iconography. Part archival study, part portrait series, this collection of remixed photographs celebrates Black women and the value of representation. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Warawar Wawa (Son of the Stars) (Photographed by River Claure, Curated by James Estrin, and Presented by Photoville and NYC Parks) Warawar Wawa (Son of the Stars) in the Aymara language, is a re-contextualization of Antoine Saint Exupéry's book Le Petit Prince for contemporary Andean culture. On view in DUMBO on Old Fulton Street.
  • Was & Is (Presented by The Everyday Projects with HuffPost, RYOT, and Verizon Media) Thirteen photographers from around the world re-photograph a scene from their archive, juxtaposing images from the past with the tumultuous year of 2020. They explore the visual imprint left on us by COVID-19, systemic racism, and social upheaval worldwide. Five of these projects are also presented in augmented reality. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • We Are Present: Portraits from the Pandemic and the Uprising (Photographed by Laylah Amatullah Barryn and Presented by Photoville) An excerpt of portraits taken by Laylah Amatullah Barrayn in New York and Minneapolis that documents the lived experiences of Black Americans during the double crisis of the pandemic, and the uprisings against injustice. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • We, Women (Presented by Photoville and Women Photograph) A preview of the traveling nationwide exhibit coming in 2021, We, Women presents the first cohort of women and nonbinary artists examining critical issues across the U.S. through photo-based, community engagement projects that resist and interrogate social and political landscapes, while promoting empathy and unity. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Where Do We Go From Here? (Presented by The Chris Hondros Fund) When it is the photojournalist's job to document the world's news events? What happens when a new, deadly disease spreads across the world and threatens nearly everyone and everything-including the photographer? Chris Hondros Fund posed these two questions to photojournalists Kiana Hayeri, Meridith Kohut, and César Rodríguez: In 2020, what did you see, and where do we go from here? On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.
  • Winners of 2020 ZEKE Award for Documentary Photography (Presented by Social Documentary Network) Last Wildest Places by Jason Houston, focuses on deforestation in the Purús-Manu region in southeastern Peru. Cousins by Kristen Emack, is a poetic look at the photographer's daughter and her three cousins, and their intimate involvement in each other's lives. On view in DUMBO (Brooklyn) at Brooklyn Bridge Park.

There will be several more exhibitions to be announced in the coming weeks!



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