BWW Review: STUPID F@#%ING BIRD Mashes Chekhov With Giddy Modernism

BWW Review: STUPID F@#%ING BIRD Mashes Chekhov With Giddy Modernism

If you're looking for clear outspoken themes and messages onstage, there are better places to look than the aching comedies of Anton Chekhov. Among his contemporaries, Count Leo Tolstoy found the best works of Chekhov difficult to grasp yet full of insights into "the inner workings of the human soul." Chekhov's mix of clinical objectivity and soul-searching empathy would become touchstones of modern drama and modern acting technique.

So it's no surprise that Aaron Posner's adaptation of Chekhov's The Seagull, irreverently retitled STUPID F@#%ING BIRD, is so willfully modernistic. Conrad Arkadina, nee Konstantine Gavrolovich Trepleff in the original, doesn't merely write the bad script we see performed early in Act 1. He's also the author of this play that we're watching and will pause to tell us about it from time to time. But that doesn't mean his mom, film producer Emma Arkadina, or his Uncle Eugene - a dying doctor - won't also address us and lay bare their ostensibly fictional souls.

We can almost go around the complete cast in this Actor's Theatre of Charlotte production simply by cataloguing their unrequited loves. Mash, who is madly in love with Conrad, is desperately beloved by Dev. But Conrad burns for the beautiful Nina, who offers body and soul to the famous writer Trigorin, who is in a committed relationship with Emma - until he isn't. Passion for other people or for art is the essence of futility among this crowd, often leading to self-loathing. Even Trigorin, slightly weary with his own fame, has restless longings that go unfulfilled.

If you already know The Seagull well, the idea of Conrad being our author is more than slightly absurd, for in the denouement, his spiraling depression begins with his ripping up all his manuscripts when he realizes he can never have Nina. Compounding the absurdity, Conrad Frankly tells us of the catastrophe to come.

Assuming that you can find the Hadley Theater on the Queens University campus near Myers Park Traditional School, you'll find that director Chip Decker - with his own fantastical set design and Hallie Gray's lighting - has grasped the zany bittersweetness of this script remarkably well. The mixture of wholesomeness, naïveté, candor, and earnestness that Chester Shepherd brings to Conrad further ensures success. Somehow, in this blizzard of fiction and reality, where Conrad is both the playwright and his protagonist, Shepherd can come to his audience for advice and handle our spontaneous feedback.

He realizes that Nina, a rather bad actress who sustains a career, is not particularly worthy of his love. Hell, Mariana Bracciale as Nina is well aware of her shortcomings as an actress, with a slight Julia Louis-Dreyfus charm wrapped into her maddening flightiness. Scott A. Miller as Trigorin realizes Nina's shallowness as well as anyone, his mind at odds with his loins in his struggle to decide what to do about her, yet he also grasps that his rascality is as much of his charm as his talent.

Emma suffers in her relationship with Trigorin and in her lack of aptitude for parenting Conrad, yet Becca Worthington is most disarming in her acknowledgement to us that she's the meanie in this story, unlikely to redeem herself. Every one else lurks on the periphery, adding to the impression that our main characters are living in a teeming world. I was fairly smitten with the comedy of Carmen A. Lawrence as Mash, for she mopes so hopelessly - and needlessly, since the loving, patient, and wise Dev is crazy about her.

Peripheral or not, Jeremy DeCarlos as Dev combines with Lawrence to give their scenes a Midsummer Night's Dream giddiness, for neither of them is among our gifted characters. Yet DeCarlos, more goofball here than I've ever seen him before, seems to have the knowledge that his waiting game - and his faith that Mash will come to her senses - will be rewarded. It's a part of his calm wisdom, which occasionally reminds Conrad (and us) what an unbalanced, disturbingly normal hysteric he is.

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From This Author Perry Tannenbaum

Perry Tannenbaum Perry Tannenbaum has been covering the performing arts across the Carolinas since 1987. He has also acted onstage in productions by Children’s Theatre of Charlotte, (read more...)

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