Carnegie Hall's THE '60S FESTIVAL Announces March Events

Carnegie Hall's THE '60S FESTIVAL Announces March EventsCarnegie Hall's The '60s: The Years that Changed America, a citywide festival from January 14-March 24, 2018, concludes this month with a vast array of events presented at Carnegie Hall and at more than 35 leading partner cultural institutions throughout New York City. This special exploration of the '60s invites audiences to explore this turbulent decade through the lens of arts and culture, including music's role as a meaningful vehicle to inspire social change.

Festival programming in March at Carnegie Hall begins on Saturday, March 10, 2018 at 8:00 p.m. with a concert in Zankel Hall by American singer-songwriter Bhi Bhiman. The concert time, which was originally scheduled at 10:00 p.m, has been changed to 8:00 p.m. to offer all ticket holders a "Mix and Mingle" event with the artist after the show.

Bhiman's songs traverse R&B, power pop, socially conscious folk, and even hints of country and rockabilly. His sweetly lilting voice conjures the late Curtis Mayfield, while his insights into the human condition recall Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan at their best. He has covered Dire Straits's "Walk of Life", sung his soulful "Moving to Brussels" in a video with comic Keegan-Michael Key, and explores political and personal issues in deeply human songs that are witty and wise.

"For our annual WFUV concerts at Carnegie Hall, I immediately thought of Bhi Bhiman because of his unique voice and ability to tell a story through song," said WFUV Program Director Rita Houston. "Influenced by the Staple Singers, Dylan and '60s music, Bhi is very much a vital young artist of our times with something to sing about."

On Sunday, March 11, 2018 at 3:00 p.m., a cast of Tony- and Grammy Award-winning Broadway, blues, hip-hop, and Americana stars join young songwriters and performers from Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute programs to showcase how music has the power to bring people together to fight for change in a special concert, A Time Like This: Music for Change. Rhiannon Giddens, Toshi Reagon, Young Paris, Carrie Compere (The Color Purple), and Ro James headline the music event-emceed by Def Poetry Jam's Lemon Andersen-that inspires, encourages, and celebrates the fight for equal rights, economic empowerment, and peace. A Time Like This: Music for Change will include iconic songs from the '60s and highlight the new music created by New Yorkers of all ages as part of a citywide creative learning project from Weill Music Institute. Taking inspiration from the protest songs and musical anthems of the 1960s, songwriters have grappled with the most pressing social issues of our time, creating new music that is a rallying cry for unity and the power of music to change the world. Learn more about the inspiration behind some of the songs here.

The Friction Quartet will perform George Crumb's amplified string quartet Black Angels, a searing response to the Vietnam War, as part of a program on Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. in Zankel Hall. Audience members will have the opportunity to explore aspects of and reactions to the Vietnam War in this program that also features live performances of pop and folk music from the 1960s-from Pete Seeger to Woodstock-coupled with extraordinary photographs and film footage. Narrated by John Monsky, who has created a new form of storytelling in this and other multimedia presentations at the New-York Historical Society, this event captures the war's intense emotions on the battlefield and at home.

Highlights of Festival Partner Event Programming in March:

Among the festival partner concert highlights are: Mothers of the Movements at Harlem Stage Gatehouse, which celebrates the contributions of Black women pioneers from the Civil Rights and Black Arts movements, including Dr. Barbara Ann Teer, Abbey Lincoln, and Ella Baker.

Dance and theater highlights include: a retrospective of influential texts written by Black women, including the article written by Dr. Barbara Ann Teer featured in The New York Times (1967) titled "The Black Woman: She Does Exist" at the National Black Theatre, Inc. The performance is accompanied by a panel discussion and audience talkback as part of the Mothers of the Movements series, presented in partnership with Harlem Stage. (March 12).

Film highlights include: free screenings at The Paley Center for Media of 1968 television programs look at how the medium reported the news and how it adapted to the changing national mood, including the historic special report from Vietnam by Walter Cronkite and an episode of The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour with Pete Seeger (March 4); Inside Bedford-Stuyvesant and a segment on Glenn Gould from Public Broadcasting Laboratory (March 11); and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (March 18); and The Museum of Modern Art celebrates the use of avant-garde and modern classical music in cinema, including landmark works from the 1960s, in Point Counterpoint: Avant-Garde Film Scores, 1955-1973. The series will include the film work of Pierre Boulez, Daphne Oram, Arvö Part, Steve Reich, Toru Takemitsu, Edgard Varèse, and others (March 14-22).

Talks include: The 1960s: Voting Rights Then and Now-an extraordinary and relevant conversation with legendary television journalist Bill Moyers-who served as one of President Lyndon Johnson's top aides during the civil rights era. He discusses the epochal events of the "Second Reconstruction" and is joined by two leaders of the current fight for democracy and veterans of courtrooms across the country in the fight against voter suppression: Kristen Clarke of the National Lawyers' Committee and Myrna Pérez of the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law (March 6); Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and activist Judy Collins-in conversation with historian Harold Holzer-looks back at the roiling decade that launched, inspired, and tested her, at the New-York Historical Society (March 13); and '60s Fashion: The Youthquake and Its Aftershocks at the Museum of the City of New York explores fashion in the 1960s as it underwent a radical transformation from the styles of the straight-laced 1950s to clothing inspired by the cultural and social revolutions that convulsed the new decade. New York designers Anna Sui and Andrea Aranow (Dakota Transit) discuss the impact of the '60s on their work with Parsons fashion scholar Hazel Clark (March 14).

Radio highlights include: the second part of a two-part series on WFMT radio network's Exploring Music with Bill McGlaughlin: Carnegie Hall during which McGlaughlin will be joined by the Director of Carnegie Hall's Archives and Rose Museum Gino Francesconi to continue touring backstage for a view of the Hall's three concert venues, its history, and the legendary performers who have appeared on its stages. Carnegie Hall has been the site of thousands of premieres in all genres of music and spoken word. Listen to artists' stories and hear some of the great ones-like Ella Fitzgerald and Leonard Bernstein-who have graced its legendary stage. (February 26-March 2).

Exhibit highlights include: an Artist Open Studios at Westbeth Artist Housing and Gallery, which was a haven for many well-known artists during the '60s, including Diane Arbus, Benny Andrews, and Robert De Niro Sr. The free tour allows special access to present-day artist spaces at Westbeth (March 18); The Vietnam War: 1945-1975, a groundbreaking exhibit at The New-York Historical Society (through April 22); Narrative and Counter-Narrative: (Re)Defining the 1960s, a collaborative exhibition at New York University's Bobst Library, focused on the 1960s at Washington Square that explores how Downtown New York became a convergence point for the activism, social upheaval, and creativity fomented during the decade. The story unfolds through artifacts and documents from the library's renowned special collections (beginning January 3); You Say You Want a Revolution: Remembering the Sixties, which explores the counterculture of the 1960s and '70s at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building of The New York Public Library (through September 1).

The '60s: The Years that Changed America

Carnegie Hall's citywide '60s festival explores the turbulent spirit of this defining decade through the lens of arts and culture, including music's role as a meaningful vehicle to inspire social change. The '60s was a watershed decade in America's history-a period in which the country was torn apart by the struggle for social justice, the fight for civil rights, and war in which more than half a million Americans were fighting on the other side of the world. As a restive younger generation was finding its voice, the world witnessed a revolution in long-held values and social norms, from culture and fashion to politics and identity.

Half a century later, as many of the hard-won victories of the 1960s are being debated, Carnegie Hall has turned for the first time to a figure outside the music world-Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian Robert A. Caro, famed biographer of Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson-for inspiration, presenting a festival examining this pivotal decade.

As part of its festival offerings, Carnegie Hall presents a series of concerts and education projects that draw inspiration from the '60s, and explore the decade's nexus of music, protest, and change. Beyond the Hall, the festival includes an extraordinary array of events presented by more than 35 partner organizations across the city and beyond-including Apollo Theater, Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Film Forum, The Museum of Modern Art, New-York Historical Society, The New York Public Library, The Paley Center for Media, and Smithsonian Folkways Recordings-that focus on a decisive moment in our country's history, a decade that changed America in ways that still reverberate today.

For the complete schedule of programming for The '60s: The Years that Changed America, January 14-March 24, 2018, visit carnegiehall.org/60s.

THE '60s: THE YEARS THAT CHANGED AMERICA FESTIVAL

MARCH 2018 EVENTS


Carnegie Hall PROGRAMMING IN MARCH

Bhi Bhiman
Saturday, March 10 at 8 PM
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

(Note: The concert time, which was originally scheduled at 10 PM, has been changed to 8 PM to offer all ticket holders a "Mix and Mingle" event with the artist after the show.)

Bhi Bhiman's songs traverse R&B, power pop, socially conscious folk, and even hints of country and rockabilly. His sweetly lilting voice conjures the late Curtis Mayfield, while his insights into the human condition recall Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan at their best. He has covered Dire Straits's "Walk of Life", sung his soulful "Moving to Brussels" in a video with comic Keegan-Michael Key, and explores political and personal issues in deeply human songs that are witty and wise. Hear him and become a fan for life.
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A Time Like This: Music for Change
Sunday, March 11 at 3 PM
Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall

A cast of Tony- and Grammy Award-winning Broadway, blues, hip-hop, and American stars join young performers from Carnegie Hall Weill Music Institute's programs to showcase how music has the power to bring people together to fight for change. Rhiannon Giddens, Toshi Reagon, Young Paris, Carrie Compere (The Color Purple), and Ro James headline this special event, emceed by Def Poetry Jam's Lemon Andersen. Come hear music that inspires, encourages, and celebrates the fight for equal rights, economic empowerment, and peace.

Leadership support for this concert is provided by an anonymous donor.

Support for The '60s: The Years that Changed America is provided by the Howard Gilman Foundation.

A Time Like This: Music for Change is part of the culminating forum of Create Justice

Lead funding for Create Justice is provided by an anonymous donor.

Major funding is provided by Ameriprise Financial, MetLife Foundation, and The Kresge Foundation.
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The Vietnam War: At Home and Abroad
Saturday, March 24 at 2 PM
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall

Explore aspects of and reactions to the Vietnam War in this program that features live performances of pop and folk music from the 1960s-from Pete Seeger to Woodstock-coupled with extraordinary photographs and film footage. Narrated by John Monsky, who has created a new form of storytelling in this and other multimedia presentations at the New-York Historical Society, this event captures the war's intense emotions on the battlefield and at home. The afternoon begins with the Friction Quartet performing George Crumb's amplified string quartet Black Angels, a searing response to the Vietnam War.
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The '60s: The Years that Changed America
January 25-March 24
Rose Museum at Carnegie Hall
154 West 57th Street, Second Floor | Manhattan
carnegiehall.org/museum

At the laying of the cornerstone in 1890, Andrew Carnegie said that "all good causes may here find a platform." At no time during Carnegie Hall's history were those words better represented than in the 1960s. This exhibit focuses on 16 events that represent the social causes that sang out to be heard. This event is free.
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FESTIVAL PARTNER EVENT PROGRAMMING IN MARCH BY GENRE

CONCERTS

Mothers of the Movements
Friday, March 9 at 7:30 PM
Harlem Stage Gatehouse
150 Convent Avenue ? Manhattan
harlemstage.org

Harlem Stage and the National Black Theatre celebrate the contributions of Black women pioneers from the Civil Rights and Black Arts movements with Mothers of the Movements. This two-part series pays tribute to iconic women, including Dr. Barbara Ann Teer, Abbey Lincoln, and Ella Baker. At Harlem Stage, longtime Lincoln collaborator Marc Cary reimagines the seminal Freedom Now Suite album, We Insist!, featuring Terri Lyne Carrington, Reggie Workman, Sameer Gupta, Edmar Colón, and surprise guests.

Presented by Harlem Stage.
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DANCE AND THEATER

The Black Woman: She Does Exist
Monday, March 12 at 7:30 PM
National Black Theatre, Inc.
2031 Fifth Avenue ? Manhattan
nationalblacktheatre.org

The National Black Theatre presents a retrospective of influential texts written by Black women, including the article written by Dr. Barbara Ann Teer featured in The New York Times (1967) titled "The Black Woman: She Does Exist." The performance is accompanied by a panel discussion and audience talkback as part of the Mothers of the Movements series, presented in partnership with Harlem Stage.

Presented by the National Black Theatre, Inc.
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FILM

Uneasy Riders: '60s Hollywood
Weekends from March 2-April 1 at 11 AM
IFC Center
323 Sixth Avenue | Manhattan
ifccenter.com

Uneasy Riders: '60s Hollywood showcases classics from an era when Hollywood broke old taboos and blazed new trails, reflecting a society undergoing monumental change. In March, the series includes Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up (1966) from March 2-4; Dennis Hopper's Easy Rider (1969) from March 16-18; Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch (1969) from March 23-25; and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) from March 30-April 1.

Presented by IFC Center
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1968/Television
Sunday, March 4, 11, and 18 at 12:15 PM
The Paley Center for Media
25 West 52nd Street | Manhattan
paleycenter.org

Screenings of 1968 television programs look at how the medium reported the news and how it adapted to the changing national mood, including the historic special report from Vietnam by Walter Cronkite and an episode of The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour with Pete Seeger (March 4); Inside Bedford-Stuyvesant and a segment on Glenn Gould from Public Broadcasting Laboratory (March 11); and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (March 18). These events are free.

Presented by The Paley Center for Media.
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Point Counterpoint: Avant-Garde Film Scores, 1955-1973
March 14-22
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street | Manhattan
moma.org

The Museum of Modern Art celebrates the use of avant-garde and modern classical music in cinema, including landmark works from the 1960s. Organized by MoMA curator Joshua Siegel, the series includes the film work of Pierre Boulez, Daphne Oram, Arvö Part, Steve Reich, Toru Takemitsu, Edgard Varèse, and others.

Presented by The Museum of Modern Art.
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Third World Newsreel 50th Anniversary Celebration
Thursday, April 5 at 6 PM
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers
40 Lincoln Center Plaza | Manhattan
nypl.org/lpa/events

Third World Newsreel (TWN), an alternative media center that started as the radical film collective Newsreel in New York, celebrates 50 years in the trenches of activist media with some of its historic classics. This event is free.

Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.
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Troublemakers: Resistance through Filmmaking
Thursday, June 7 at 6 PM
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers
40 Lincoln Center Plaza | Manhattan
nypl.org/lpa/events

Watch screenings of historical works from the Library's 16mm film collection, which document and embody the counterculture movement of the 1960s. This event is free.

Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.
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TALKS

The 1960s: Voting Rights Then and Now
Tuesday, March 6 at 6 PM
New York University Law School
Vanderbilt Hall
40 Washington Square South | Manhattan
brennancenter.org/events

A half century after the Voting Rights Act guaranteed the franchise to all Americans, access to this fundamental right is once again under siege. How did a group of great citizens drive the enactment of the Voting Rights Act? How did the legislation work to secure access to the ballot? Why is its pledge once again under attack?

In an extraordinary and relevant conversation, legendary television journalist Bill Moyers-who served as one of President Lyndon Johnson's top aides during the civil rights era-discusses the epochal events of the "Second Reconstruction." He is joined by two leaders of the current fight for democracy and veterans of courtrooms across the country in the fight against voter suppression: Kristen Clarke of the National Lawyers' Committee and Myrna Pérez of the Brennan Center's Democracy Program. This event is free.

Presented by the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law.
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The Idea of El Museo
Wednesday, March 7 at 6:30 PM
The New School
66 West 12th Street | Manhattan
elmuseo.org

Join us for an insightful exchange between Patrick Charpenel, El Museo del Barrio's current director, and founder Raphael Montañez Ortiz as they discuss El Museo's origins in 1969, its significance in the Latin American and Caribbean arts community, and its current place as a cultural institution in New York City. This event is free.

Presented by El Museo del Barrio in partnership with The New School.
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The '60s From Both Sides Now: An Evening with Judy Collins
Tuesday, March 13 at 6:30 PM
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West ? Manhattan
nyhistory.org

Part of the Bernard and Irene Schwartz Distinguished Speakers Series, Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter, and activist Judy Collins-in conversation with historian Harold Holzer-looks back at the roiling decade that launched, inspired, and tested her.

Presented by the New-York Historical Society.
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'60s Fashion: The Youthquake and Its Aftershocks
Wednesday, March 14 at 6:30 PM
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue ? Manhattan
mcny.org/mod

Fashion in the 1960s underwent a radical transformation from the styles of the straight-laced '50s to clothing inspired by the cultural and social revolutions that convulsed the new decade. Downtown young designers, many self-taught, invented new looks, paving the way for trends of the '70s onward. Join New York designers Anna Sui and Andrea Aranow (Dakota Transit) as they discuss the impact of the '60s on their work with Parsons fashion scholar Hazel Clark.

Presented by the Museum of the City of New York.
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The Great Society: Then and Now
Tuesday, March 20 at 6 PM
New York University Law School
Vanderbilt Hall
40 Washington Square South | Manhattan
brennancenter.org/events

Medicaid. Medicare. Food Stamps. Head Start. The Great Society of the 1960s is still woven deeply into American life. And it is the subject of vociferous attack in Congress, editorial pages, and presidential tweets. The original drive for the Great Society, led by the still-controversial Lyndon B. Johnson, had at its heart a guarantee of health care for the old and the poor. Steadily, conservatives have built up a formidable counter-drive-culminating in today's congressional assault on Medicaid. What impact do these fights have on our nation? Why are Great Society policies still under attack?

We hear from Joseph Califano, chief domestic aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson and an architect of the Great Society program. Califano served as Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare in the Carter administration, and is one of the nation's leading voices on health and addiction policy. He is joined by Karen Tumulty, a columnist at The Washington Post who closely covered recent fights over Medicaid, immigration, and the Affordable Care Act. This event is free.

Presented by the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law.
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50 Years After the Revolution: New Perspectives on 1968
April 27-28
Faculty House, Columbia University
64 Morningside Drive | Manhattan
library.columbia.edu/rbml

This two-day conference features panel discussions and a film screening as scholars, activists, and students consider the legacies of 1968 for politics and society today. This event is free; registration required.

Presented by Columbia University.
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EXHIBITS

Artist Open Studios
Sunday, March 18 at 1:00 PM
Westbeth Artist Housing and Gallery
55 Bethune Street ? Manhattan
westbeth.org

Westbeth was a haven for many well-known artists during the '60s, including Diane Arbus, Benny Andrews, and Robert De Niro Sr. Originally an industrial complex whose conversion to artist lofts was designed by Richard Meier, Westbeth was the largest artists' living-and-working space in the world at the time, and included artists from all disciplines: actors, sculptors, writers, musicians, dancers, and so on.

This free Open Studios tour allows visitors special access to present-day artist spaces at Westbeth. Participating artists include Bill Anthony, Jonathan Bauch, Beverly Brodsky, Anne Brody, Ray Ciarrocchi, Sandra Caplan, Jack Dowling, Jon D'Orazio, Tom Duncan, Patricia Hacker, Gerald Marcus, Avri Ohana, Jean Promutico, Sheila Schwid, David Seccombe, Shelley Seccombe, Frances Seigel, Ken Wade, and John Whittaker. This event is free.

Presented by Westbeth Artist Housing and Gallery.
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Countdown to Eternity: Photographs of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s
Permanent Exhibition
LaGuardia Gallery of Fine Arts at LaGuardia Community College
31-10 Thomson Avenue | Queens
http://www1.cuny.edu/sites/cuny-arts

Documenting the last year of the life of the late civil rights leader, this exhibition of photos by Benedict J. Fernandez includes the recent addition of accompanying text by Dr. Stephen Weinstein, under the direction of Dr. Richard K. Lieberman of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, in conjunction with the photographer and LaGuardia Humanities Department Professor Hugo Fernandez. A special event in March will mark the 50th anniversary of Dr. King's assassination. This event is free.

Presented by the City University of New York & CUNY Arts.
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The Vietnam War: 1945-1975
Through April 22
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West ? Manhattan
nyhistory.org

This groundbreaking exhibit explores the Vietnam War's causes, conduct, and consequences, both on the battlefront and the US home front. The exhibition recounts the heartrending events of the era and captures the perspectives and voices of its history makers-from political and military leaders, to journalists, service members, nurses, family members, and activists. This event is free with museum admission.

Presented by the New-York Historical Society.
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Narrative and Counter-Narrative (Re)Defining the 1960s
Beginning January 3
Bobst Library, New York University
70 Washington Square South | Manhattan
library.nyu.edu/locations/elmer-holmes-bobst-library

This collaborative exhibition focuses on the 1960s at Washington Square through selections from NYU Libraries Special Collections. From sanctuary to gallery, from the classroom to the streets, the exhibition explores the activism, issues, and creativity that unfolded during the decade and how Downtown New York became an influential convergence point. This event is free.

Presented by New York University Libraries Special Collections.
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Harlem Postcards
January 25-March 24
Lobby, Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall
studiomuseum.org

Harlem Postcards is an ongoing project that invites artists of diverse backgrounds to reflect on Harlem as a site of cultural activity, political vitality, visual stimuli, artistic contemplations, and creative production. As part of The '60s festival, four artists are featured, each drawing inspiration from the dynamic social and cultural climate of the decade, considering the rich artistic landscape of the moment, as well as political activism and social change. Each photograph has been reproduced as a limited-edition postcard available free to visitors at Carnegie Hall. This event is free to Zankel Hall ticketholders.

Presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem.
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You Say You Want a Revolution: Remembering the Sixties
January 19-September 1
The New York Public Library
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue ? Manhattan
nypl.org

Discover the counterculture of the 1960s and '70s. From communal living and forays into expanded consciousness, to tensions around race, politics, sexuality, and the environment, this exhibition explores the breadth and significance of this period. Items on display include Timothy Leary's notes on acid trips, San Francisco Diggers broadsides, and posters used in protest against the Vietnam War. Curated by Isaac Gewirtz (Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature). This event is free.

Presented by The New York Public Library.
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Artifacts of Change
January 19-April 29
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center
40 Lincoln Center Plaza ? Manhattan
nypl.org/lpa/events

Memorabilia from maverick artists of the 1960s-Allen Ginsberg, Jimi Hendrix, Elaine Summers, and others-will be on display at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in conjunction with the exhibition at the Library's Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Among the many iconic items will be the program from the Woodstock Music & Art Fair and Phil Ochs's The War Is Over songbook. This event is free.

Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.
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The Global Interconnections of 1968
January 23-May 18
Kempner Exhibition Gallery, Butler Library (Sixth Floor),
Columbia University
535 West 114th Street ? Manhattan
library.columbia.edu/rbml

From Morningside Heights to Mexico City, Czechoslovakia to China, Paris to Pretoria, the yearlong crises of 1968 linked world communities in a unique and epochal series of dramatic confrontations. The repercussions are still being felt. This exhibition marks the 50th anniversary of these events, drawing from original archival materials. This event is free.

Presented by the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University.
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Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away
February 9-May 9
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue ? Manhattan
guggenheim.org/danhvo

The first comprehensive survey in the United States of work by Danish artist Danh Vo (born in Vietnam, 1975) will fill the ramps of the Guggenheim's rotunda, offering an illuminating overview of his production from the past 15 years. Vo's work addresses sweeping themes of colonialism, capitalism, and religion as they are refracted through intimate personal narratives, with a particular focus on the legacy of military and cultural incursions into Vietnam by Western powers.

Presented by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
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The Art of March: A Civil Rights Masterpiece
February 28-June 30
Society of Illustrators
128 East 63rd Street | Manhattan
https://www.societyillustrators.org/index.php

For the first time ever, the Society of Illustrators is proud to present a selection of work from the award-winning graphic novel trilogy March, a vivid first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis's lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis's personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader Civil Rights Movement.

Presented by the Society of Illustrators.
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ART GALLERIES AND MORE
Coordinated by Keyes Art Projects, leading galleries and institutions across the city provide a unique behind-the-scenes glimpse at the vibrant arts scene during the 1960s and the artists who helped to define the decade.

Artistic Vanguard: The 1960s at The Art Students League
Saturday, March 3 at 12:00 PM
The Phyllis Harriman Mason Gallery
The Art Students League of New York
215 West 57th Street ? Manhattan
theartstudentsleague.org

The Art Students League of New York is a legendary community of artists-founded by and supporting artists since 1875-that has shaped America's legacy in the fine arts. This exhibition explores new experiments in post-war painting by League artists during a decade that transformed the American art world. The event is free.

Open Studios Tour
Join an Open Studios Tour with Curator Jillian Russo and see where Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Roy Lichtenstein, Mark Rothko, and others in the artistic vanguard of the 1960s created their masterpieces.
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Max's Kansas City
January 14-March 24
Mark Borghi Fine Art
52 East 76th Street ? Manhattan
borghi.org

Mark Borghi Gallery exhibits a survey of photos and writings from the clientele of Max's Kansas City, the infamous New York nightclub and restaurant that served as the gathering spot for some of the most talented and revolutionary personalities of the '60s and '70s, including Andy Warhol, Lou Reed, Forrest Myers, and John Chamberlain. This event is free.

Presented by Mark Borghi Fine Art.
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RADIO/DIGITAL

Smithsonian Folkways Music
Beginning January 14
folkways.si.edu/60s

Celebrated record label Smithsonian Folkways holds more than 10,000 resources related to the 1960s. Through thousands of audio recordings and a host of educational materials, the decade comes alive with a panoply of music and sound. Learn the rich repertoire of the Civil Rights Movement, listen to original recordings of iconic folk musicians, and read about peace songs of the 1960s in Smithsonian Folkways Magazine.

Presented by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.
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Studs Terkel Radio Archive
Beginning January 19
studsterkel.org

Legendary oral-historian and radio host Studs Terkel was a unique chronicler of the social and artistic tumult of the 20th century. The new Studs Terkel Radio Archive (from the Chicago History Museum and the WFMT Radio Network) is partnering with the Kronos Quartet in the creation of a world-premiere piece by composer Stacy Garrop that features the quartet playing with the archival voices of Terkel in conversation with legendary gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. In celebration of The '60s festival, a collection of excerpts from some of Terkel's conversations about the arts and protest will be made available online.

Presented by the Studs Terkel Radio Archive.
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Exploring Music with Bill McGlaughlin
February 26-March 2 at 10:00 PM
exploringmusic.org

Bill McGlaughlin and Gino Francesconi, director of Carnegie Hall's Archives and Rose Museum, continue touring backstage for a view of the Hall's three concert venues, its history, and the legendary performers who have appeared on its stages. Carnegie Hall has been the site of thousands of premieres in all genres of music and spoken word. Listen to artists' stories and hear some of the great ones-like Ella Fitzgerald and Leonard Bernstein-who have graced its legendary stage.

Part II of Exploring Music with Bill McGlaughlin: Carnegie Hall will be broadcast Monday, February 26 through Friday, March 2 on the WFMT network. Check local listings for station and broadcast information.

Presented by the WFMT Radio Network.
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carnegiehall.org/60s

Artist interviews, in-depth videos, exclusive footage, partner content, and more shed light on the importance of the 1960s and the decade's continuing influence on our world today.

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Support for The '60s: The Years that Changed America is provided by the Howard Gilman Foundation.

Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets for events taking place at Carnegie Hall are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, carnegiehall.org.

For tickets to The '60s: The Years that Changed America festival partner events, please contact the specific venue.

For Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance or until supply lasts. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.

In addition, for all Carnegie Hall presentations in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of partial view (seats with obstructed or limited sight lines or restricted leg room) will be sold for 50% of the full price. For more information on this and other discount ticket programs, including those for students, Notables members, and Bank of America customers, visit carnegiehall.org/discounts. Artists, programs, and prices are subject to change.

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For high resolutions images of The '60s: The Years that Changed America artists, please contact the Carnegie Hall Public Relations Office at 212-903-9750 or publicrelations@carnegiehall.org.

Photos at top of release: Bhi Bhiman by Alejandro Gonzalez de la Pena; photo block - Rhiannon Giddens by John Peets, Toshi Reagon by Erica Beckman, Carrie Compere by Duckpond Photography, Young Paris by Leslie Kirchhoff, and Ro James by Sarah McColgan; Friction Quartet publicity photo; Dr. Teer courtesy of her estate; Judy Collins by Brad Trent; You Say You Want A Revolution: Diana Davies, Protester at Weinstein Hall demonstration for the rights of gay people on the New York University campus, 1970, The New York Public Library, Manuscripts and Archives Division.

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