EXCLUSIVE: Jason Robert Brown at Work on A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN Musical?!

A classic sports movie could be getting the musical treatment soon.

Jason Robert Brown revealed in concert on Friday night at SubCulture in New York City that he is at work on a new musical adaptation of the 1992 Tom Hanks film, A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN. No word yet as to when we may hear the Tony Award-winner's score or who else is on the creative team.

Keep checking BroadwayWorld as we learn more details about this exciting news!

Jason Robert Brown is a Tony Award-winning composer, whose "The Bridges of Madison County," a musical adapted with Marsha Norman from the bestselling novel recently closed on Broadway, directed by Bartlett Sher and starring Kelli O'Hara and Steven Pasquale (it next heads out on tour). "Honeymoon In Vegas," based on Andrew Bergman's film, is currently running on Broadway following a triumphant production at Paper Mill Playhouse last fall. A film version of his epochal Off-Broadway musical "The Last Five Years" was released earlier this year, starring Anna Kendrick and Jeremy Jordan and directed by Richard LaGravenese.

His major musicals as composer and lyricist include: "13", written with Robert Horn and Dan Elish, which began its life in Los Angeles in 2007 and opened on Broadway in 2008 (and was subsequently directed by the composer for its West End premiere in 2012); "The Last Five Years", which was cited as one of Time Magazine's 10 Best of 2001 and won Drama Desk Awards for Best Music and Best Lyrics (and was subsequently directed by the composer in its record-breaking Off-Broadway run at Second Stage Theatre in 2013); "Parade," written with Alfred Uhry and directed by Harold Prince, which premiered at Lincoln Center Theatre in 1998, and subsequently won both the Drama Desk and New York Drama Critics' Circle Awards for Best New Musical, as well as garnering Jason the Tony Award for Original Score; and "Songs for a New World," a theatrical song cycle directed by Daisy Prince, which played Off-Broadway in 1995, and has since been seen in hundreds of productions around the world.

"Parade" was also the subject of a major revival directed by Rob Ashford, first at London's Donmar Warehouse and then at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. His orchestral adaptation of E.B. White's novel "The Trumpet of the Swan" premiered at the Kennedy Center with John Lithgow and the National Symphony Orchestra, and the CD was released on PS Classics.

Future projects include a new chamber musical created with Daisy Prince and Jonathan Marc Sherman called "The Connector", an untitled new piece created with Claudia Shear and Casey Nicholaw, and a new solo album for release in 2015. Jason is the winner of the 2002 Kleban Award for Outstanding Lyrics and the 1996 Gilman & Gonzalez-Falla Foundation Award for Musical Theatre. Jason's songs, including the cabaret standard "Stars and the Moon," have been performed and recorded by Audra McDonald, Billy Porter, Betty Buckley, Karen Akers, Renée Fleming, Philip Quast, Jon Hendricks and many others, and his song "Someone To Fall Back On" was featured in the Walden Media film, "Bandslam."

ABOUT A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN: As America's stock of athletic young men is depleted during World War II, a professional all-female baseball league springs up in the Midwest, funded by publicity-hungry candy maker Walter Harvey (Garry Marshall). Competitive sisters Dottie Hinson (Geena Davis) and Kit Keller (Lori Petty) spar with each other, scout Ernie Capadino (Jon Lovitz) and grumpy has-been coach Jimmy Dugan (Tom Hanks) on their way to fame. Madonna and Rosie O'Donnell co-star as two of the sisters' teammates.

The film was released on July 1, 1992, and was #1 by its second weekend (July 10-12). It was a commercial success, making $107 million in the United States (and an additional $25 million worldwide) on a $40 million budget, and was well received by critics.

The Jimmy Dugan proclamation, "There's no crying in baseball!" was rated 54th on the American Film Institute's list of the greatest film quotes of all time.

A television series based on the film aired on CBS in April 1993, with Garry Marshall, Megan Cavanagh, Tracy Reiner, and Jon Lovitz reprising their roles. It was quickly cancelled.

Related Articles

More Hot Stories For You

Before you go...

Like Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Follow Us On Instagram instagram
   
popup