Americana Rhythm & Blues Band Roosevelt Dime to Play in Granby, 3/19

Brooklyn-based Americana rhythm & blues band Roosevelt Dime will be performing on Saturday, March 19, in Granby, Conn., as part of the Salmon Brook Music Series. Lead singer Eben Pariser is a New Haven resident.

You can see a live video of their upcoming single "Red Shoes" and hear Roosevelt Dime's recently released cover of Tom Petty's "American Girl."

Plus, if fans buy their tickets in advance, they will be given a download code for the full online music catalog as part of "The New Deal"!

The concert will take place at South Congregational Church Hall, 242 Salmon Brook Street, Granby, CT 06035. Call 860-653-7289 for more information. Doors at 7:00 / Show at 7:30. Tickets - $15.

For more, go to www.rooseveltdimemusic.com or follow Roosevelt Dime on Facebook: www.facebook.com/rooseveltdime and Twitter: www.twitter.com/rooseveltdime.

Seamlessly combining the feel-good groove of classic Rhythm and Blues with acoustic Americana instrumentation, Roosevelt Dime has crafted an infectious style and sound truly their own. Eben Pariser fronts the band with searingly soulful vocals, belted and whispered with a passion and panache straight from the juke joints. Andrew Green's innovative piano-inspired banjo style, equal parts boogie woogie and bluegrass, lock in with the New Orleans clave rhythms of Tony Montalbano's drums and Craig Akin's syncopated upright bass. The swampy chords and swinging blues lines of Pariser's semi-hollow electric guitar thicken the sound further still. By following the strains of Americana back to its roots, they not only combine aspects of different genres, but challenge the notion of these differences at their core. Hailing from Brooklyn, New York, the band started in the age old New Orleans street busking tradition, only it was the bustling avenues of the Big Apple rather than the Big Easy that first nurtured their sound. All walks of life were drawn to the undeniable positivity and crowd-sourced spontaneity at these revelries, and this literal grassroots community-building stuck with the band as they took their joyous beat from the city's parks and subways to seek that same heartfelt connection with audiences worldwide. Armed with original songs of hope, love, and conviction that sound birthed from the cradle of American music yet still crucially relevant to the times in which we live, their performances are a "perpetual crowd pleaser" (NY Times) in any setting.



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