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BWW Interviews: Nigel Lythgoe Talks Dance Crews, Broadway, and Justin Bieber

Related: SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE
BWW Interviews: Nigel Lythgoe Talks Dance Crews, Broadway, and Justin Bieber

While the spectacle of AMERICAN IDOL, THE VOICE, and DANCING WITH THE STARS can be extremely entertaining, for true fans of creativity and self-expression through art, there is no better show on television than SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE.

The 11th season of SYTYCD begins this Wednesday, May 28th at 8:00/7:00 C. Recently I participated in a conference call with the show's creator, Executive Producer, and judge Nigel Lythgoe. In the excerpts from the conversation below, Uncle Nigel talked about the changes for this season, SYTYCD alums on Broadway, and Justin Bieber... yep Justin Bieber (bonus points if you can pick out the questions I asked).


Back in January you mentioned that you were going to do something with dance crews. How is that going to work in context with the rest of the competition?

Obviously, we don't want to get in the way of the main competition. So this is going to be occurring over the audition shows. We're going to introduce two crews in each show, and ask the public to tweet which crew out of the two that they would like to see perform on the actual stage live. (The crew) with the highest tweets will perform on the finale.

That's going to be presented by Justin Bieber. He's a huge So You Think You Can Dance fan. He watched it in Canada, and here in America; he loves it and is going to be presenting that part of the show. We really do want to keep it separate from the individual competition.

Are there are other major changes to the formula?

We're going back to the individual winner. We've been quite lenient in the past and said, "Which is your favorite male? Which is your favorite female?" but we're going to make America choose.

It's been an interesting Broadway season for some of your choreographers with Spencer Liff working on HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH and Sonya Tayeh working with KUNG FU. With the success of your choreographers and contestants, can you talk about how important this competition has become for the world of dance, to get these artists exposed to a larger audience?

Yes, I think it's something that we didn't originally realize how it important it would be for the choreographers. We focused on the dancers and what the dancers had to do, but of course it's just as important for what the choreographers do.

We sort of gave faces to choreographers. So it had a major impact, I think, on choreography with wonderful choreographers like Mia Michaels, Sonya, and Wade Robson involved.

Now, of course, the dancers are training themselves, since they were sort of eight and nine years of age, to come on to SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE. So consequently, they are putting a lot more into their curriculum, different styles, and I think we've put the street kids together with the formally trained kids, and that gives a totally different element and style to these dancers now.BWW Interviews: Nigel Lythgoe Talks Dance Crews, Broadway, and Justin Bieber

It just gives them much more commerciality, because they can do so much more. So, from that point of view, it's always great to come down to New York and watch Broadway shows that the kids are in, whether it's AFTER MIDNIGHT, NEWSIES, or any of them.

But, we're going to be doing-I'm going to be part of the team that's producing an AMERICAN IN PARIS early next year. We're opening in Paris in November/December, and hopefully the winner of So You Think You Can Dance will be offered a part in an American in Paris as well. So it all ties in at the end of the day doesn't it?

Absolutely. You've been very vocal on social media about needing people to tune in so that hopefully there could be a Season 12. Has FOX given you any indication what this season has to do, numbers wise, to continue moving forward next year?

No, FOX has never really said anything about what they hope to achieve with it. It's an undiluted audience. So their advertising, their sales teams, know exactly who to sell commercials to, and I think we've been successful across the years because of that.

It's desperate times almost for all of the broadcasters with the web coming so strongly through and the cable guys coming through. It's tough times all around. So we are just going to have to do really well. Like most shows now, everything that you do is based on your figures of that season not on past history.

Do you think though that a show like yours, which has always taken its subject matter very seriously while remaining entertaining while the other types of competitions may be are struggling a little bit more now? Do you think that maybe that gives you a better chance in this landscape because you've always had a hard-core audience that takes this show very seriously, and it can be maybe less trendy?

I just think dance in itself, especially how we treat it, we're not putting celebrities in it. When it comes to the competition, it isn't like DANCING WITH THE STARS that you can watch for various reasons. We're just deeply focused on dance, the different styles, the different genres.

And we haven't got anybody saying, "Pack your suitcase; you're going home next week." We're saying, "Point your toes. Straighten your leg," which of course doesn't appeal to everybody. So we know what we are, and we've always said, "We're the little program that could."

I believe in our strength. But, like most shows, we've been losing viewers and the viewing figures have been going down. I would certainly like to bolster them up, if not keep them the same as last year.

You've had some amazing celebrity judges on the show as guests. Who would you like to see as a celebrity judge?

So many, to be frank with you, and you can't always get it right. Once you start using professional performers and artists they're never really going to be as honest as they want to be because they don't want to lose fans. So you've got to be very careful how you do it.

BWW Interviews: Nigel Lythgoe Talks Dance Crews, Broadway, and Justin BieberThere are wonderful people like Christina Applegate who really are honest in their opinion and couch it very nicely rather than being rude, as others well try and do on SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE. We all try and be creative, but there's only so much that you can say.

I guess I would've loved people that sort of give us the credibility of dance, like Baryshnikov, certainly in the ballroom field, Pierre Dulaine, who I've just done that move with DANCING IN JAFFA. He knows what he's talking about, and he knows what he's looking for. In the world of tap, it would've been great to have had Savion Glover on.

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Matt Tamanini Matt is BroadwayWorld's Chief TV and Film critic. He also writes across other BWW sites, and serves as BWW's Database Manager. He received a BA in Journalism/Communications from The Ohio State University and has worked in sports broadcasting, media relations, and journalism. He also has directed and/or produced over 30 plays and musicals, and is currently writing two plays of his own. You can connect with Matt through Twitter: @BWWMatt.



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