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BroadwayWorld Chicago Looks Back: Reviews of Tony-winner Jessie Mueller's Chicago Stage Performances!

BroadwayWorld Chicago Looks Back: Reviews of Tony-winner Jessie Mueller's Chicago Stage Performances!

Between graduating from Syracuse University in 2005, and getting her Broadway break opposite Harry Connick, Jr., in 2011, Tony Award winner Jessie Mueller was a Chicago-based actress, following in the steps of her Evanston-based parents, Roger Mueller and Jill Shellabarger. And what a career she had in the Windy City!

From "Henry IV, Parts I & II" at Chicago Shakespeare Theater to "A Christmas Carol" and "Animal Crackers" at the Goodman Theatre, starring in "Meet Me In St. Louis" at the Drury Lane Theatre and winning a Jeff Award for her Amalia Balash in "She Loves Me" at Writers Theatre, Mueller rose to notice quickly and, it seems, inevitably. Her Tony win last night, for her portrayal of Carole King in "Beautiful," is just the latest in an increasingly impressive list of credits for the now 31-year-old.

I first reviewed a performance by Jessie Mueller for BroadwayWorld courtesy of Hyde Park's Court Theatre, where she won her first Jeff Award as Carrie In "Carousel," directed by Charles Newell. In my March 20, 2008 review of that production, I noted that "the evening's Carrie Pipperidge, Jessie Mueller, makes a strong impression, with saucer eyes and saucy delivery."

READ THE REVIEW: Court Theatre's 'Carousel': Moving But Earthbound

In three successive reviews of her work at the Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire, the stature of her work grew and grew. Two years after "Carousel," on March 1, 2010, I reviewed "Fiddler on the Roof" at the Marriott, starring long-time Chicago stars Ross Lehman and Paula Scrofano, and directed by Northwestern University's David H. Bell. Check this out:

"And then, buckle your seatbelts! The fierce actress Jessie Mueller may very well be turning in a world-class performance at Tzeitl here--I cannot imagine anyone else with her combination of voice, acting chops and sheer gutsy chutzpah in the role. Her scene with Lehman in which Tzeitl begs with her very life, for the ability to marry her childhood sweetheart instead of a wealthy man she doesn't love, rocketed the show into the stratosphere. This first chink in the wall of Tevye's world was shattering, followed by bittersweet joy. Again--you simply must see it. This scene was one of many in which the honest acting of the entire company--surely one of Bell's strong directorial points--was thrillingly realized."

I kind of want to see that performance again!

READ THE REVIEW: Lincolnshire's 'Fiddler': A Must-See, With Quibbles

Eleven months later, on the same stage, Mueller starred as Adelaide in "Guys and Dolls," next to her older sister, Abby Mueller, as Sarah Brown. Their father, Roger Mueller, played the paternal Arvide Abernathy, in the production directed and choreographed by the young Matt Raftery. I quote from my review of February 14, 2011:

"The chief asset of this productionBroadwayWorld Chicago Looks Back: Reviews of Tony-winner Jessie Mueller's Chicago Stage Performances! is the Miss Adelaide of Jessie Mueller. Solidifying her position as Chicago's leading soubrette, Mueller is beyond superb in this iconic role. She captures the real woman beneath the ridiculous conceit of the character (engaged 14 years, with nothing but a psychosomatic head cold to show for it), and delivers the two "Hot Box" numbers realistically and professionally, with a great high mix singing voice. You don't want to miss her performance if you think that traditional musical comedy performance is on its way out. You are wrong."

I'd say a trend is definitely underway!

READ THE REVIEW: "Guys And Dolls" Comes Out A Mid-Winter Winner At The Marriott!

And then, four months later, came Mueller's last Chicago appearance to date, in the 1960s jukebox revue, "Shout!," reconceived, directed and choreographed by Rachel Rockwell. On June 27, 2011, I said, "Our newest musical star, Jessie Mueller, becomes a women here, taking moving material into unexpected avenues and gutsing it out with her superlative mix voice." OK, then!!

READ THE REVIEW: Love In The "Dating Game" Era - SHOUT Is Reconceived By Lincolnshire's Marriott Theatre

BroadwayWorld Chicago Looks Back: Reviews of Tony-winner Jessie Mueller's Chicago Stage Performances!Jessie Mueller didn't finish the run of "Shout!," by the way. She had to move to New York, where rehearsals were underway for "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever." The revised version of Alan Jay Lerner and Burton Lane's 1965 Broadway musical, originally a vehicle for Chicago's Barbara Harris, began previews on November 12, 2011 at Broadway's St. James Theatre, opened on December 11, 2011 and closed on January 29, 2012. Mueller was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Tony, playing a role that included part of the material originally performed by Harris. She didn't win the award. But the rest is, indeed, history.

Mueller's Chicago stage family, and by that I mean her extended family of co-workers and fans here, cheered her on to Tony victory last night at parties and on social media. What is next for this young woman, now on the top of at least two theater towns? Your guess is as good as mine. But I wouldn't be surprised if the sky itself were not quite the limit. Congratulations, Jessie!

PHOTOS: From Top: Jessie Mueller and Ross Lehman in "Fiddler on the Roof;" Jessie Mueller and Abby Mueller in "Guys and Dolls;" Jessie Mueller, Brooke Jacob, Tammy Mader, Raena White and Carey Anderson in "Shout!"

PHOTO CREDITS: Peter Coombs and Marriott Theatre

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Paul W. Thompson Paul W. Thompson, a contributor to BroadwayWorld.com since 2007, is a Chicago-based singer, actor, musical director, pianist, vocal coach, composer and commentator. His career as a performer, teacher and writer is centered at Paul W. Thompson Music, located in Chicago’s historic Fine Arts Building, where he teaches the great songs of Broadway to the next generation of musical theater performers. A native of Nashville, Tennessee, Paul was raised in a family of professional musicians and teachers, steeped in classical, gospel, country, pop, sacred and show music. Dubbed a “thin, winsome lad” at the age of 13 by a critic for the Nashville Banner, he earned two degrees in musical theater (a B.F.A. with Honors from Baylor University and an M.M. from the University of Miami, Florida), plus an M.B.A. with Distinction from DePaul University. Paul’s memberships include Actors’ Equity Association, the American Guild of Musical Artists, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (proud voter for the Grammy Awards!), the National Association of Teachers of Singing and New York’s Drama League.

Moving easily between the worlds of classical music, religious music, classic pop and musical theater, Paul has appeared onstage or in the orchestra pit in concerts, musicals, operettas and operas in 30 states and in Europe, in a career spanning more than 35 years. His Chicagoland stage credits include “Forever Plaid” at the Royal George Theater and twenty mainstage productions at Light Opera Works. Paul joined the Chicago Symphony Chorus in 1995 (he was Tenor I Section Leader for four years and sings on two Grammy-winning recordings), and is one of Chicago’s foremost liturgical singers, marking 20 years as a member of the choir at St. James Cathedral (Episcopal) in 2011.He has composed and arranged a number of anthems, hymns and songs for worship and concert use, and collaborates on the creation of new works of musical theater. Paul can be found on Monday nights watching showtune videos at the world-famous Sidetrack nightclub, the inspiration for his weekly column, “The Showtune Mosh Pit.” His proudest achievement is that he has seen the original Broadway production of every Tony Award-winning Best Musical since “Cats.” No, really. Since “Cats!”


 
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