Donald Sanders Releases The Wonder Woman Lynda Carter Photo Book

Donald Sanders Releases The Wonder Woman Lynda Carter Photo Book

Donald Sanders Releases The Wonder Woman Lynda Carter Photo Book

ABC-TV still photographer, Donald Sanders has released his third photo book this week. His newest subject is the beautiful 70s icon, Lynda Carter. The Wonder Woman Lynda Carter Photo Book is a 66-page book containing a treasure trove of never before seen Lynda Carter images take by Sanders during the . These images capture the young actress as she beings her reigns as Wonder Woman during her very first press junket and beyond.

The book pages showcase over 100 color and B/W photos by Sanders in which he captures Carter's youth, newness, innocence and immense beauty. Between the images Sanders candidly shares anecdotes, from their first meeting, first photo session and first impressions. Not only does Sanders reveal fantastic unpublished photos he took so long ago, he includes a backstage and behind the scenes narrative as well.

Sanders ask his close friends to share their memories of Lynda Carter, top 70s make-up artist, Daniel Eastman and Mike Pingel, the author of Channel Surfing: Wonder Woman share their experiences with this wonder of a woman.

In the 70s when Sanders was a ABC-TV still photographer he took on shows as Happy Days, LAVERNE AND SHIRLEY, SOAP, DONNY & MARIE, TAXI, THREE'S COMPANY, MORK & MINDY and CHARLIE'S ANGELS. Donald's was also known for his celebrity portraits which is images was seen worldwide in newspapers, magazines and broadcast TV. Sanders images have graced the pages of Cosmopolitan, People, Rona Barrett's Hollywood, Preview, TV Guide to name a few.

Sanders has also released two other photo books, Farrah Fawcett: A Photo Essay & The Original Charlie's Angels Scrapbook. All three of his books are available on Amazon.com.

Title: The Wonder Woman Lynda Carter Photo Book

Release: June 2017

Pages: 66; Color, Black & White images

Publisher: Independent

Cost: $21.99

Available: Amazon.com

About Author/Photographer Donald Sanders:<


After working as an extra on over a dozen movies, Donald segued in to a photographer's assistant job. He learned about studio lighting, preparing sets, using props, but most of all working with actors and models. As Donald's skills developed, he was soon freelancing for many magazines and newspapers and his photography was getting lots of attention from top Hollywood talent and PR agents. A test photo shoot at ABC-TV with MAUREEN REAGAN led Donald to a staff job as still photographer for the network local. Regis Philbin'S first original morning show and GOOD MORNING AMERICA's Hollywood segments were Donald's firstassignments at the network. Being the new young still photographer at ABC-TV had a disadvantage. His photo assignments were not the network hits, they were new shows no one heard of, and short lived or pilot shows that never made it on the air more than once, were his photo assignments. Luck has it, some of these new shows overflowed with success. Unproven first season shows like Happy Days, LAVERNE AND SHIRLEY, SOAP, DONNY & MARIE, TAXI, THREE'S COMPANY, MORK & MINDY and of course CHARLIE'S ANGELS were Donald's first network assignments. Donald's portraits of the stars of these shows appeared all over the world in newspapers, magazines and broadcast TV. Donald became very well known shooting stills on over 100 prime time TV shows for both ABC-TV and 20th CENTURY FOX DOMESTIC TELEVISION.

Flash forward to 1988, locations, sets, colors, and IMAGES, started being generated on computers digitally. Many studio jobs like animators and set builders where being replaced by computers. Still photographers like Donald were warned that the images they so skillfully created will be generated and enhanced from the motion picture film and actual video. Except for the few heavy production days, there was no longer a need for a unit stillman.

With film being replaced with computer images another facet of Hollywood's golden film past, comes to an end. The end of film was a turning point for Donald. The new Hollywood was not exactly what Donald signed up for when he became a film maker, albeit still film. He felt that a certain glamour, creativeness and magic was lost in the new Hollywood.

In 1990, it was "good-bye" Hollywood and "Aloha Hawaii." Donald, his spouse, Lamont and their three dogs, moved lock, stock, and barrel to Hawaii. For the next 25 years they worked in the visitor industry and on their little coffee farm. Donald has fond memories of his past in Hollywood.