BWW Review: SCOTTISH BALLET'S THE CRUCIBLE, Theatre Royal, Glasgow

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BWW Review: SCOTTISH BALLET'S THE CRUCIBLE, Theatre Royal, Glasgow

BWW Review: SCOTTISH BALLET'S THE CRUCIBLE, Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Arthur Miller's 1953 play The Crucible is the ideal story to be adapted as a ballet. Set during the 1600's Salem witch trials, this gothic piece is very tense and unsettling. It is a tale based around the dangers of lies and false accusations.

A group of young girls are seen playing in the woods. Though the setting is dark and eerie there is a sense of fun and impishness. When one is discovered dancing wildly by her father, Reverend Parris, she faints and claims that it was some other force. The town descends into hysteria as witchcraft is considered to blame and accusations start flying. The storytelling is very accessible and the plot is clear throughout.

Choreographed by Helen Pickett, the dancing is exquisite- particularly during a love scene between Abigail and John Proctor. During the court scene it becomes a bit unpleasant to watch, but this is the intention as it is a dark and uncomfortable story.

David Flynn's lighting design is exceptional and the use of shadow makes this a very atmospheric piece. Another element that is particularly striking is the rotating set piece that acts as a ceiling, backdrop and projects a crucifix onto the stage. Without dialogue, Emma Kingsbury's costume design becomes all the more important. During the trial it is easy to tell who is being accused.

Delightfully creepy and utterly captivating, Scottish Ballet's The Crucible is wonderful portrayal of a story that is hauntingly relevant today.

Scottish Ballet's The Crucible is at the Theatre Royal, Glasgow until 28 September.

Photo credit: Jane Hobson



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