Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial Actor

Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial Actor

Like Andy Warhol, another well-known, towheaded, Avant Garde artist who pushed the boundaries of his art form, Klaus Kinski was one of the most celebrated and controversial actors in the history of world cinema. The reckless abandon with which he approached both life and art left him tortured, demonized and worshiped by scores of his fans. And since the German actor died in November 1991, there is no way to speak with him now about what motivated him and why he felt so tortured throughout his life.

The project first germinated when writer/actor Andrew Perez lined up interviews with Phyllis Winter (a very close friend during the last 10 years of Kinski's life in Lagunitas, CA) and her daughter Sara to learn more about the temperamental artist. He then worked hand in hand with director Eric G. Johnson to interview the two women which led to the creation of a theatrical tribute to the outspoken artist entitled THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, a hit at the 2017 Hollywood Fringe Festival which is now enjoying an open-ended encore run on Thursday nights at Studio C on Hollywood's Theatre Row. While it may not be for everyone given its confrontational style of presentation, it will open your eyes to the genius probably best known for his portrayal of Nosferatu the Vampire in Director Werner Herzog's 1979 film. Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial ActorAnd with his shock of bleached blond hair, large forehead and bugged-out eyes, it may be difficult to tell where the line was drawn between his character and Kinski himself.

Perhaps his controversial nature was due in part to his early childhood, born to German nationals in Zappot, Germany. His failed opera singer turned pharmacist father and his nurse mother, who was the daughter of a local pastor, were unable to make a living during the Great Depression and moved to Berlin in 1931 where the family also struggled financially. Then after being conscripted at the age of 17 into the German army in 1943, he was wounded and captured by the British on his second day of combat in the Netherlands. It was during this time that Kinski played his first roles on stage to maintain morale among the prisoners.

Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial ActorNo doubt the experience there contributed to his outspoken nature. So much so that when he heard that sick prisoners were to be returned home first, Kinski tried to qualify by standing outside naked at night, drinking urine and eating cigarettes. He remained healthy but finally was returned to Germany in 1946 after spending a year and four months in captivity. Upon arriving back in Berlin, he learned his father had died during the war, and his mother had been killed in an Allied air attack on the city. It is easy to imagine how his already tortured soul sunk even deeper into rage and despair. The next year he was fired by the manager at his first theater job due to his unpredictable behavior. Other companies followed, but his unconventional and emotionally volatile behavior regularly got him into trouble.

The reckless abandon with which he approached both life and art left him a tortured B-movie character actor who became a touring sensation for his live wire theatrical performances. Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial ActorIt was during this time that Kinski starred as Jesus Christ in a one-man show that had taken him a decade to write. Audiences were outraged at Kinski's audacious portrayal of Jesus and heckled him mercilessly. After only 2 performances Kinski canceled the tour.

This is the Klaus Kinski presented by Andrew Perez, a man on the verge of reality who enters proclaiming himself to be the reincarnated Jesus Christus Now. Jumping up on a soap box style crate, Perez proceeds to present Kinski's strange sensibilities loudly to the standing microphone. It is this style of performance that continues throughout the 90-minute performance, often a challenge to the attention of audience members until they are called upon to respond to Perez as he takes great joy in speaking directly to several attendees as he runs up and down the center aisle spewing either rants or attempting to seduce you, probably one of the most infamous aspects of his life.

Review: In THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, Andrew Perez Embodies the Controversial ActorIn this latest incarnation of THE SECOND COMING OF KLAUS KINSKI, patrons are welcomed on the stage before the show to read about different aspects of the man's life through relics, curios, exhibits, film installations, live conversations and more including Kinski's own record of his sexual conquests and more. The information obtained will greatly enhance your understanding of the play, so arrive a bit early and take advantage of the opportunity. The show's opened-ended run takes place on Thursday evenings at 8pm at Studio C - 6448 Santa Monica Blvd, Hollywood, CA 90038. Tickets are $20.00 and may be purchased at the door or pre-ordered at www.klauskinskilive.brownpapertickets.com. Appropriate for ages 16 and over.? More info at www.klauskinskilive.com Just be prepared for the rantings of a narcissist, stuck in his own private insane asylum!


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From This Author Shari Barrett