Review Roundup: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHTTIME at Syracuse Stage

Review Roundup: THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHTTIME at Syracuse Stage

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHTTIME runs through November 12 at Syracuse Stage. It is based on the novel of the same name by Mark Haddon, and was adapted by Simon Stephens.

Meet Christopher John Francis Boone. At 15 years old, he knows all the Capital Cities in the world and every prime number up to 7,507. But he struggles to understand the world around him. When Christopher is suspected of murdering his neighbor's dog, he sets out to find the real culprit. His investigation will take him on a journey to a past he never knew and a future he never imagined possible.

The cast stars Mickey Rowe as Christopher Francis Boone, Elizabeth Ledo as Siobhan, Robert Neal as Ed, Constance Macy as Judy, Eric Parks as Roger Shears/Voice 2, Gail Rastorfer as Mrs. Shears/Voice 1, David Alan Anderson as Rev. Peters/Voice 4, Margaret Daly as Mrs. Alexander/Voice 6, Mehry Eslaminia as Punk Girl/Voice 5, and Landon G. Woodson as London Policeman/Voice 3.

CURIOUS INCIDENT is directed by Risa Brainin, with original music by Michelle DiBucci, scenic design B. Russell Metheny, costume design by Devon Painter, lighting design by Michael Klaers, sound design by Todd Mack Reischman, and projection design by Katherine Freer.

Let's see what the critics had to say!

Linda Lowen, Syracuse.com: As Christopher, Mickey Rowe is the first autistic performer to be cast in the role in any production anywhere, and he brings a gut-level authenticity to the show that 'neurotypical' actors (those not on the spectrum) would be hard pressed to match... Sets, costuming, projection design, sound and lighting initially feel minimalist until you adjust to Christopher's perspective and begin to experience the world as he does; at that point, the subdued opening scenes give way to a rush of abrupt fast-paced images that overload the senses. Again, the tightly-collaborative process of the production team bolsters every remarkable moment onstage.

Natasha Ashley, BroadwayWorld: Mickey Rowe's ability to relate to the character of Christopher due to his own situation in real life makes his portrayal all the more impressive and believable. Rowe respectfully portrays Christopher's struggles brilliantly. He is very much a physical actor and his movement is entrancing. The production features a highly intelligent ensemble cast. The entire ensemble allows Rowe to take the spotlight and they play off of him perfectly.

Stefani Clark, The News House: The actors evoked a spectrum of emotions from the audience. From laughter to saddened silence, the viewers were easily jerked from feeling to feeling. With such a difficult story to tell, the actors did a wonderful job of connecting to the audience. Simple costumes and stage props allowed the characters to be more relatable, and gave audience members more to latch onto. A two-hour production that is visually and emotionally stimulating, "Curious Incident" left the audience connected to Christopher and empathetic to his story.

Photo: Syracuse Stage


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