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Tony Winner Rosemary Harris to Star in Roundabout Theatre's INDIAN INK this Fall

Tony Winner Rosemary Harris to Star in Roundabout Theatre's INDIAN INK this Fall

Roundabout Theatre Company has announced Tony Award winner Rosemary Harris will play the role of "Eleanor Swan" in the Off-Broadway premiere of Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink, directed by Carey Perloff. The production will begin performances on September 4 and open Sunday, September 28, 2014 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold & Miriam Steinberg Centre for Theatre (111 West 46th Street).

Tom Stoppard's relationship with Roundabout Theatre Company includes Broadway productions of The Real Inspector Hound and The Fifteen Minute Hamlet. Rosemary Harris was last seen on the Roundabout stage in The Road to Mecca (2011) and All Over (2002). Next season Roundabout will also present a new production of Mr. Stoppard's The Real Thing on Broadway starring Ewan McGregor & Maggie Gyllenhaal, directed by Sam Gold. This production of Indian Ink will mark the play's Off-Broadway debut.

Set on two different continents and in two different eras, Indian Ink follows free-spirited English poet Flora Crewe on her travels through India in the 1930s, where her intricate relationship with an Indian artist unfurls against the backdrop of a country seeking its independence. Fifty years later, in 1980s England, her younger sister Eleanor tries to preserve the legacy of Flora's controversial career. Little by little, Flora's mysterious past is revealed, as is the surprising story of two people whose connection lives on through art. An evocative portrait of love and loss, Indian Ink movingly explores how the creative spirit can bring us together in the most unexpected ways.

The full cast and design team will be announced soon.

Indian Ink will play Tuesday through Saturday evening at 7:30PM with Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 2:00PM.

BIOGRAPHIES:

ROSEMARY HARRIS (Eleanor Swan) was born in England but brought up in India. She graduated from RADA with the Bancroft Gold Medal when she was directed by Mary Duff in The Heiress. Her first job in the London theatre was understudying and looking after Nellie the greyhound in The Gay Dog at the Piccadilly Theatre. She then made her London debut in the The Seven Year Itch having already starred in Moss Hart's Climate Of Eden on Broadway. Following a season at the Bristol Old Vic playing Elizabeth Proctor in the British premier of The Crucible she joined the London Old Vic to play Desedemona opposite Richard Burton in Othello followed by Cressida in Tyrone Guthrie's production of Troilus And Cressida. When Ellis Rabb formed APA in 1960 she joined the Company and appeared in productions of works by Shakespeare, Shaw, Sheridan, Chekhov, Isben, Wilde, Pirandello and Kaufman and Hart at the Lyceum Theatre on Broadway. She also played the title role in Peter Pan. In 1962 she appeared in Laurence Olivier's Company at the Chichester Festival Theatre for their first season in the The Broken Heart and Chances and returned the following year for Uncle Vanya. In 1964 she joined the National Theatre to play Ophelia opposite Peter O'Toole in Laurence Olivier's inaugural production of Hamlet followed by IIyena in his production of Uncle Vanya. In 1967 she created the part of Eleanor of Aquitane in The Lion in Winter on Broadway for which she won a Tony Award and in 1969 she was awarded the Evening Standard Award for Best Actress for her performance in Plaza Suite. In 1970 she appeared opposite Jack Lemmon in Idiot's Delight at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles, in 1971 she played Anna in Peter Hall's production of Old Times on Broadway, 1973 she played Blanche in A Streetcar Named Desire and Portia in the The Merchant of Venice at the Lincoln Centre Repertory Theatre directed by Ellis Rabb, in 1975 she played Julie Cavendish in Royal Family on Broadway, 1980 she played Madame Arkadina in The Seagull at the Public Theater in New York followed by the Three Sisters and New York Idea at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, in 1982 she appeared in All My Sons in the West End in Heartbreak House with Rex Harrison and Diana Rigg at the Haymarket playing Ariadne Utterwood. She appeared in Heartbreak House on Broadway, again with Rex Harrison but in this production she played Hesione Hushabye. She then played Barbara Jackson in Pack Of Lies on Broadway. In 1985 she spent six weeks at Oxford University lecturing to American drama students after which she returned to Broadway to play Judith Bliss in Hayfever. In July 1986 she opened at the National Theatre in The Petition with John Mills which then transferred to the Wyndhams Theatre. In 1987, she appeared in The Best of Friends at the Apollo Theater co-starring with Sir John Gielgud and Ray McNally. In 1989, she starred in Steel Magnolias with Miranda Richardson at the Lyric. She starred in the Lyric Hammersmith's production of In the Summerhouse. In 2002, she starred in a highly acclaimed run of Edward Albee's All Over at the Roundabout in NYC. Her numerous television credits include "Notorious Woman" in which she played George Sand for which she was awarded an Emmy for best actress. She was awarded Golden Globe for her portrayal of Berte Weiss. She also appeared in a television special entitled "The Chisholms" in which she co-starred with Robert Preston and "To The Lighthouse" adapted from Virginia Wolf's novel where she played Mrs. Ramsey. She also was in "Strange Interlude". She then completed a BBC play, "Summer Day's Dream" with Sir John Geilgud, directed by Christopher Morahan. Her films include "The Boys from Brazil" with Greogory Peck and Laurence Olivier, "Beau Brummel", "A Flea in her Ear", "The Shiralee", "The Ploughman's Lunch", "Sunshine", "Tom and Viv", "Being Julia". "Spider-Man 1, 2 and 3," "Before The Devil Knows Your Dead" directed by Sidney Lumet and most recently "This Means War" opposite Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine. She still lectures regularly at Oxford University and is married to the novelist John Ehle and they have a daughter Jennifer who is also an actress ["Possession 2002"].

TOM STOPPARD (Playwright). Tom Stoppard's work for the stage includes Arcadia, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, The Real Inspector Hound, Jumpers, Travesties, Night and Day, The Real Thing, Hapgood, Indian Ink, The Invention of Love, The Coast of Utopia (winner of the most Tony Awards of any new play on Broadway) and Rock 'n' Roll. His translations and adaptations include works by Lorca, Nestroy, Schnitzler, Molnar, Pirandello and Chekhov. Among his television credits are "Professional Foul" and "Squaring the Circle." Film work includes Billy Bathgate, Brazil, Empire of the Sun, Enigma and Shakespeare in Love. He directed the film of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. For radio he has written "If You're Glad, I'll Be Frank," "Albert's Bridge" and "In the Native State." In 2006 Stoppard's multi-award-winning Rock 'n' Roll opened at the Royal Court. The production, directed by Trevor Nunn, subsequently enjoyed a sell-out West End run as well as a season on Broadway produced by Sonia Friedman Productions.

CAREY PERLOFF (Director). Perloff recently celebrated her 20th year as artistic director of A.C.T., where she most recently directed Arcadia, Elektra (co-produced by the Getty Villa in Malibu), Endgame andPlay, Scorched, The Homecoming, Tosca Cafe (co-created with choreographer Val Caniparoli and recently toured Canada), and Racine's Phèdre in a co-production with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. Known for directing innovative productions of classics and championing new writing for the theater, Perloff has also directed for A.C.T. José Rivera's Boleros for the Disenchanted; the world premieres of Philip Kan Gotanda's After the War (A.C.T. commission) and her own adaptation (with Paul Walsh) of A Christmas Carol; the American premieres of Tom Stoppard's TheInvention of Love and Indian Ink and Harold Pinter'sCelebration; A.C.T.-commissioned translations/adaptations of Hecuba, The Misanthrope, Enrico IV, Mary Stuart, UncleVanya, A Mother, and The Voysey Inheritance (adapted by David Mamet); the world premiere of Leslie Ayvazian's Singer's Boy; and major revivals of 'Tis Pity She's a Whore, The Government Inspector, Happy End (including a critically acclaimed cast album recording), A Doll's House, Waiting for Godot, The Three Sisters, The Threepenny Opera, Old Times, The Rose Tattoo, Antigone, Creditors, The Room,Home, The Tempest, and Stoppard's Rock 'n' Roll, Travesties, The Real Thing, Night and Day, and Arcadia. Perloff 's work for A.C.T. also includes Marie Ndiaye'sHilda, the world premieres of Marc Blitzstein's No for an Answer and David Lang/Mac Wellman's The Difficulty of Crossing a Field, and the West Coast premiere of her own play The Colossus of Rhodes (Susan Smith Blackburn Award finalist). Her playLuminescence Dating premiered in New York at The Ensemble Studio Theatre, was coproduced by A.C.T. and Magic Theatre, and is published by Dramatists Play Service. Kinship was developed at the Perry-Mansfield New Play Festival and at New York Stage and Film (2013); Waiting for the Flood has received workshops at A.C.T., New York Stage & Film, and Roundabout Theatre Company. Higher, was developed at New York Stage and Film and presented at San Francisco's Contemporary Jewish Museum in 2010; it won the 2011 Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation Theatre Visions Fund Award and received its world premiere in February 2012 in San Francisco. Her one-act The Morning After was a finalist for the Heideman Award at Actors Theatre of Louisville. Perloff has collaborated as a director on new plays by many notable writers, including Gotanda, Nilo Cruz, Timberlake Wertenbaker and Robert O'Hara. Before joining A.C.T., Perloff was artistic director of Classic Stage Company in New York, where she directed the world premiere of Ezra Pound's Elektra, the American premiere of Pinter's Mountain Language, and many classic works. Under Perloff 's leadership, CSC won numerous OBIE Awards, including the 1988 OBIE for artistic excellence. In 1993, she directed the world premiere of Steve Reich and Beryl Korot's opera The Cave at the Vienna Festival and Brooklyn Academy of Music. A recipient of France's Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and the National Corporate Theatre Fund's 2007 Artistic Achievement Award, Perloff received a B.A. Phi Beta Kappa in classics and comparative literature from Stanford University and was a Fulbright Fellow at Oxford. She was on the faculty of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University for seven years and teaches and directs in the A.C.T. Master of Fine Arts Program. Perloff is on the Board of the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Sarasota, Florida, and is the proud mother of Lexie and Nicholas.

The Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre opened in March 2004 with an acclaimed premiere of Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel starring Viola Davis, directed by Dan Sullivan. In the ten years since that landmark production, the center has expanded beyond the Laura Pels Theatre to include the Black Box Theatre and now a new education center. The Steinberg Center continues to reflect Roundabout's commitment to produce new works by established and emerging writers as well as revivals of classic plays. This state-of-the-art off-Broadway theatre and education complex is made possible by a major gift from The Harold and Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust. The Trust was created in 1986 by Harold Steinberg to promote and advance American Theatre as a vital part of our culture by supporting playwrights, encouraging the development and production of new work, and providing financial assistance to not-for-profit theatre companies across the country. Since its inception, the Trust has awarded over $70 million to more than 125 theatre organizations.

Roundabout Theatre Company is committed to producing the highest quality theatre with the finest artists, sharing stories that endure, and providing accessibility to all audiences. A not-for-profit company, Roundabout fulfills its mission each season through the production of classic plays and musicals; development and production of new works by established and emerging writers; educational initiatives that enrich the lives of children and adults; and a subscription model and audience outreach programs that cultivate and engage all audiences.

Roundabout Theatre Company presents a variety of plays, musicals, and new works on its five stages, each of which is specifically designed to enhance the needs of Roundabout's mission. Off-Broadway, the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre, which houses the Laura Pels Theatre and Black Box Theatre, with its simple sophisticated design, is perfectly suited to showcasing new plays. The grandeur of its Broadway home on 42nd Street, American Airlines Theatre, sets the ideal stage for the classics. Roundabout's Studio 54 provides an exciting and intimate Broadway venue for its musical and special event productions. The Stephen Sondheim Theatre offers a state of the art LEED certified Broadway theatre in which to stage major large-scale musical revivals. Together these distinctive homes serve to enhance Roundabout's work on each of its stages.

Roundabout's 2013-2014 season includes Sophie Treadwell's Machinal, starring Rebecca Hall and directed by Lyndsey Turner; Donald Margulies' Dinner with Friends, directed by Pam MacKinnon; Masteroff, Kander & Ebb's Cabaret, starring Alan Cumming, Michelle Williams, directed by Sam Mendes & Rob Marshall (co-director/choreographer); Tesori & Crawley's Violet, starring Sutton Foster, directed by Leigh Silverman; and Just Jim Dale, starring Jim Dale, directed by Richard Maltby Jr.

Roundabout's 2014-2015 season includes Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing starring Ewan McGregor & Maggie Gyllenhaal, directed by Sam Gold; Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink, directed by Carey Perloff; and Michael Frayn's Noises Off, starring Andrea Martin, directed by Jeremy Herrin.

Photo Credit: Walter McBride

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