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We Never Learn - 1928 - Broadway

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Eltinge 42nd Street Theatre

(New York, NY)
236 W. 42nd St.
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by Marakay Rogers - Sep 9, 2013
Director Rich Repkoe and a tight, talented cast bring Tennessee Williams' classic play alive on stage in Lancaster County.
by Nancy Grossman - Sep 25, 2009
SpeakEasy Stage Company makes fun of religion and makes it funny with Nancy E. Carroll and Paula Plum leading the way in this New England premiere
by Jade Kops - Sep 17, 2019
PARTY SNAKE challenges us on concepts around conformity, ways of being, expectations, the life of an artist and the nature of relationships.
by Shari Barrett - Sep 15, 2018
Have you ever wished for one more chance to say something to someone who has passed away suddenly? What if there was an organization that could arrange for messages to be delivered to those who have died by pairing you up with someone terminally ill who agrees to deliver that message once they have passed on? Would you do it? And what if it was extraordinarily expensive with no way of knowing if your message was ever received? That is the simple magical premise of THE UNTRANSLATABLE SECRETS OF NIKKI CORONA, a new play written by Obie Award-winning playwright Jose Rivera, premiering at the Geffen Playhouse through October 7.
by Jon Bee - Sep 10, 2018
In some ways, history is all we have in terms of building a brighter future. At times, we either forget that history, or we never learn about such events that would lead us to make more informed decisions. Remembering historical events clearly isn't the most sought after activity to spend your time. Thus enters the world of theater, where people come to delve into stories and as an added bonus walk out after the show a little more educated than they were walking in. Such was the case for myself in taking in DCPA's production of Vietgone.
by Gabrielle Sierra - Oct 26, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by Jeff Dennhardt - Oct 21, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by Gary Naylor - Oct 20, 2020
Even the introduction of the excellent Naomie Harris can do little to rescue a show that makes you look forward to global warming.
by Jack L. B. Gohn - Oct 2, 2010
Great performances, challenging issues, iffy sound. If you know the show, great. If you're a newbie, come, but bone up on the lyrics first.
by Caryn Robbins - Oct 18, 2012
In this week's MEET THE PRESS, PRESS Pass conversation, David Gregory sat down with documentary filmmaker Ken Burns to talk about the state of our political discourse, view of government, and his new documentary "The Dust Bowl."
by Matt Tamanini - Oct 12, 2014
When I first heard about Showtime's new drama THE AFFAIR, I was a bit confused. The majority of the premium channel's new shows boast a major star in the lead; William H. Macy in SHAMELESS, Don Cheadle in HOUSE OF LIES, Liev Schreiber in RAY DONOVAN, Matt LeBlanc in EPISODES… ok maybe they don't all have a big star. However, the most well-known actor in THE AFFAIR is Charlie Conway, Pacey Witter, Peter Bishop, Joshua Jackson, and he's not even one of the main stars. That dubious honor belongs to THE WIRE's Dominic West and LUTHER's Ruth Wilson. Also rounding out the main characters is the always delightful, but hardly a household name, Maura Tierney.
by BWW News Desk - Nov 6, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by BWW News Desk - Nov 6, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by Caryn Robbins - Nov 3, 2015
National Geographic Channel's two-night movie event Saints &Strangers, premiering Nov. 22-23 at 9/8c, goes deep inside the familiar historical account of Thanksgiving
by BWW News Desk - Nov 29, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by BWW News Desk - Nov 29, 2009
Certain small, old towns of the Northeast are full of time warps. People crossing the street can seem like they sprang from decades past and certain buildings are forgotten relics, unseen and unnoticed. As a boy, playwright/director Jim Farmer saw 'The Sound of Music' in a large, decrepit movie theater in Hawley, PA, near Lake Wallenpaupack. The movie palace's sad and spooky overtones brought back feelings he had as a younger child, when he was taken by his parents to a supper club in Bayonne NJ, his hometown. Surrounded by its scratchy jazz band and eerie, wrinkled comics, Farmer knew that he wasn't experiencing a 'Jack Benny Show' of the past but a David Lynch moment of the future.
by Gabrielle Sierra - Nov 28, 2008
THE WIDOWING OF MRS. HOLROYD By D.H. Lawrence Directed by Stuart Howard TICKETS NOW ON SALE! 'A tremendous, yet simple, dramatic experience. This is a moving play about the tension between men and women: the essential misunderstandings and the necessary needs. It contrasts the power of sexuality with the power of peace. And neither wins.' - Clive Barnes, The New York Times, 1973
by TV News Desk - Nov 22, 2015
National Geographic Channel's two-night movie event Saints &Strangers, premiering Nov. 22-23 at 9/8c, goes deep inside the familiar historical account of Thanksgiving
by Caryn Robbins - Nov 2, 2016
Today, Miriam Shor speaks exclusively with BWW about returning to the stage and reveals whether she is #TeamCharles or #TeamJosh when it comes to YOUNGER's Season 3 love triangle!
by Alexa Criscitiello - Nov 14, 2019
After a wildly popular production in December of 2017, An Other Theater Company is re-mounting the hilarious Santaland Diaries by David Sedaris and Joe Montello, with Jordan Kramer reprising his role in this one man show about a man who takes a job as a Macy's elf over Christmas. 
by Randy Rice - May 9, 2009
Trinity Rep closes its regular theater season with the premiere of 'Shapeshifter', written by Laura Schellhardt and directed by Laura Kepley. The production runs through May 31st.
by Jeff Davis - May 26, 2013
In complete darkness, the Godlike voice of a judge echoes. To the unseen jury, the voice states, "Premeditated murder is the most serious charge tried in our criminal courts…One man is dead. Another man's life is at stake…In the event that you find the accused 'Guilty,' the bench will not entertain a recommendation for mercy. The death sentence is mandatory in this case. You're faced with a grave responsibility." Moments later, twelve men file into the jury room. As they immediately discuss everything from the weather to an upcoming ball game to their desire to "get it over with," it becomes clear that all of them failed to grasp the importance of the judge's stern and eloquent instructions. All, that is, except for the solitary juror who detaches from the group and stares pensively out the window. So begins 12 Angry Men, Reginald Rose's gritty and brutally honest examination of our judicial system, now playing in a stark and powerful new production at Austin's City Theatre.
by Keith Tittermary - May 19, 2014
British playwright Mike Bartlett is a wordsmith. He has an ability to tell a story through dialogue and stage direction that it completely unique to anything else. He has had quite a few success in London, notably, King Charles III, a three hour epic about the eventual rise of the Prince of Wales. He called it a 'future history play' mimicking the history plays of Shakespeare.
by Marianka Swain - May 10, 2019
Seventy years on from its Broadway opening, Marianne Elliott and Miranda Cromwell present Arthur Miller's masterpiece afresh in an inspired, shattering revival. One key change - making the 1940s Loman family African-American - gives the play a whole new texture, while retaining its searing condemnation of the American Dream's false promises.
by Brent Englar - Mar 30, 2012
In Jacqueline E. Lawton's new play, BLOOD-BOUND AND TONGUE-TIED, the parallels to the tragedy of Oedipus co-exist awkwardly with a story about race and identity in 20th-century America.
by Audrey Liebross - Mar 26, 2018
There is much to enjoy in Coyote Stageworks' production of THE COCKTAIL HOUR, by A.R. Gurney: the script is funny, the directing is top-notch, and there is a great deal of excellent acting. Unfortunately, one actor was sick at the performance I attended, resulting in problems for the show that night.
by Brent Englar - Mar 20, 2012
Fells Point Corner Theatre produces an excellent production of Annie Baker's compelling play, CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION.
by Marakay Rogers - Mar 18, 2013
Although the first act feels just a bit slow in its development, and one or two of the cast take a few moments to warm into their roles as one watches, it is certainly not unsatisfactory. But it is the second act of WAIT UNTIL DARK that is what the audience is there for, especially for the ending. And the second act does not disappoint.
by Gabrielle Sierra - Mar 15, 2011
Two chances for contemporary New Yorkers to hear what 1970's New Yorkers -- vanguards of the punk movement -- were up to.
by Elliot Lanes - Jun 7, 2017
Today's subject Veanne Cox is currently living her theatre life onstage at Shakespeare Theatre Company (STC) playing the role of Arsinoé in The School for Lies. The show runs through July 9th at the Lansburgh Theatre.
by Jeffrey Walker - Jun 3, 2013
A wealth of talent has come together to produce The Guardsman at the Kennedy Center. It is a handsome production, worthy of any stage in the nation. Playwright and translator Richard Nelson has created a multi-layered dramatic comedy based closely on Ferenc Molnar's original 1910 play. With direction by Gregory Mosher, The Guardsman stars Finn Wittrock and Sarah Wayne Callies as married actors.
by Tyler Peterson - Jun 24, 2016
Greece's most prominent film director of the post-1968 era, Theo Angelopoulos (1935–2012) was a master cinema stylist. His investigations into history and politics, tyranny and resistance, and spiritual anomie and emotional devastation place him on equal footing with filmmakers like Andrei Tarkovsky, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Wim Wenders. Today, at a time when Greece has struggled with impending economic collapse, and as the country's refugee crisis has worsened, with displaced populations fleeing war in the Middle East and massing on its borders, the themes of Angelopoulos's cinema are pressing once again. Museum of the Moving Image will present Eternity and History: The Cinema of Theo Angelopoulos, a complete retrospective of the director's career—the first in the United States in 25 years—from July 8 through 24, 2016. The retrospective will also be presented at the Harvard Film Archive in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from July 15 through August 22. The presentation of the retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image was made possible with support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation and the Hellenic American Chamber of Commerce.
by Marianka Swain - Jun 23, 2017
Ashley Gilmour's previous work includes Link Larkin in Hairspray and the ensemble of the original revival cast of Miss Saigon. Now, he's graduated to playing Chris in the UK and Ireland tour of Boublil and Schonberg's legendary musical, which begins at Curve Leicester on 1 July.
by Shari Barrett - Jul 24, 2017
The dialogue in Adam Rapp's searingly and brutally honest play NOCTURNE is so beautifully written with remarkably descriptive phrases, it will awe your imagination into immersing yourself into one man's journey after, as a teen, he unwittingly caused the death of this younger sister in a late-night, tragic car accident on a country road due to failing brakes. The Son, whose name we never learn, is brilliantly portrayed by Jamie Wollrab who engulfs his entire being into telling one man's journey of redemption in this gut-wrenching yet hauntingly lyrical mediation on guilt and grief, all of which begins with the repeated line, "Fifteen years ago, I killed my sister."
by BWW News Desk - Jul 21, 2008
The Drama Desk and Obie Award-wining Mint Theater Company today announced their upcoming season.
by Estelle Hallick - Jan 23, 2012
It's 1957 on an excruciatingly hot day in New York and twelve men of different upbringings, professions, demeanors, beliefs, and ages are locked in a room to decide the fate of a young man who has been accused of stabbing and killing his father. The guys are sure they will be home in time to catch the Yankees game. It's an open and shut case. Everyone thinks so… until Juror #8 reveals that he's not positive that the young man is guilty. This admission of reasonable doubt ignites the unreasonable amongst these strangers, and so begins the riveting production of Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men playing through February 5th at Merrick Theatre and Center for the Arts.
by Jade Kops - Feb 9, 2015
Mike Bartlett's 90 minute play, COCK looks at a different kind of Love Triangle with humour, emotion and passion as a man must choose between his long-time boyfriend, and the girlfriend he found at the bus stop.
by BWW News Desk - Feb 4, 2009
THE WIDOWING OF MRS. HOLROYD By D.H. Lawrence Directed by Stuart Howard TICKETS NOW ON SALE! 'A tremendous, yet simple, dramatic experience. This is a moving play about the tension between men and women: the essential misunderstandings and the necessary needs. It contrasts the power of sexuality with the power of peace. And neither wins.' - Clive Barnes, The New York Times, 1973
by BWW News Desk - Feb 4, 2009
The Drama Desk and Obie Award-wining Mint Theater Company (Jonathan Bank, Artistic Director) continues the 2008-2009 season with The Widowing Of Mrs. Holroyd by D.H. Lawrence beginning February 4th. Opening Night is set for March 1st.
by Jeffrey Ellis - Feb 28, 2018
One thing becomes abundantly clear while witnessing Bailey McCall Thomas' emotionally charged performance of the song 'Cabaret' during a performance of the iconic Broadway musical of the same name: there is perhaps no 'title song' quite so evocative, quite so stunning as John Kander and Fred Ebb's composition for Cabaret. For it is during that song, performed by Sally Bowles in a Weimar era nightclub in Berlin, that the show's entire focus - every theme that shapes the work in order to tell its totally engrossing and entertaining story - is brought sharply into view, set to a memorable melody that seems at once to be both joyous and mournful, ensuring that every audience member experiences a response unique to them.
by Jeanmarie Simpson - Feb 27, 2017
Blacklisters ain't for sissies. It is, however, a vital work by a serious young playwright, produced by an essential young theatre company that must be encouraged and supported. Our survival depends on it.
by Alan Henry - Feb 23, 2015
I never saw Once, now playing at The Ed Mirvish Theatre in Toronto, during the National Tour's engagement here last year. After attending the media opening of the all-Canadian production Sunday afternoon, I can see why a return engagement was needed. Audiences will fall in love with this show, over and over again.
by Rakaputra Paputungan - Feb 14, 2020
LENTERA SINTAS INDONESIA, an organization supporting sexual abuse survivors, is teaming up with performing arts veterans in bringing MUSIKAL BELAKANG PANGGUNG as part of their #MulaiBicara (#StartTalking) campaign. Described as 'a play about a musical', the show will delve into the minds of sexual abuse survivor and those around her.
by Reynard Loki - Dec 23, 2008
The Drama Desk and Obie Award-wining Mint Theater Company (Jonathan Bank, Artistic Director) continues the 2008-2009 season with The Widowing Of Mrs. Holroyd by D.H. Lawrence beginning February 4th. Opening Night is set for March 1st.
by Misha Davenport - Dec 10, 2019
CPA Theatricals presents a winning new holiday musical, THE LAND OF FORGOTTEN TOYS.
by Alexa Criscitiello - Aug 29, 2019
Group 9 Productions will present an industry reading of 'DeliKateSSen,' a play by Richard Atkins, directed by Matthew Penn with dramaturgy by Mark Medoff, September 23 at 4:30 PM in the Mary Rodgers Room of The Dramatists Guild, 1501 Broadway, 7 fl.
by Amy Hanson - Aug 17, 2016
The Surge is a new play from The King's Players of King's College London inspired by contemporary British politics.  A new MP gets involved in a student campaign, as protests she speaks at turn to violence and the media accuse her of supporting riotous behaviour.  She is then forced to consider whether she is able to make any sort of worthwhile change in a dismissive, uncaring Parliament.
by Alan Katz - Aug 12, 2014
As the strange and sharp-turning story unfolds, it becomes clear that there are eerie similarities between the regime of the genocidal dictator and the living arrangements of these six men. They are a group of urban creatures who have moved out into the country to live a self-sufficient life. They live in a supposedly egalitarian commune that actually has strong class-based divides. And all isn't as it seems to be.
by BWW News Desk - Apr 9, 2011
Two chances for contemporary New Yorkers to hear what 1970's New Yorkers -- vanguards of the punk movement -- were up to.
by Peter Nason - Apr 30, 2020
BWW Reviewer Peter Nason chooses the best musical theatre characters from 1940-2020; see if your favorites made the cut!