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Local H Announces Sold-Out Drive-In Concert

Local H Announces Sold-Out Drive-In Concert

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Local H Announces Sold-Out Drive-In Concert

At a time when so many artists are looking for ways to connect with their audience, Alt-rock duo Local H have announced a drive-in concert on June 25th at the legendary Harvest Moon Drive-In in Gibson City, IL. Within minutes of the announcement the show was sold out. "Who could've predicted that the drive-in movie theater would be the thing to swoop in and save the day? It's pretty ironic given that we've spent the last few decades determined to stamp them out. But I'm a big fan of irony AND drive-ins - so this is kind of a dream come true." says Local H frontman Scott Lucas. The band, who have been tearing it up on social media since the start of the pandemic when their final 5 shows on the mostly sold out tour with Soul Asylum were cancelled, have been forced to postpone their headline tour planned for this spring along with cancelling multiple festival appearances that were scheduled throughout the summer. More information on the Harvest Moon Drive In is available here.

Earlier this year, Local H shared their latest LP, Lifers on AntiFragile Music. The record reached #5 on the iTunes rock album chart and saw praise from Billboard, AllMusic, NewNoise and more. LIFERS Features contributions by an array of respected friends and guests -including Juliana Hatfield, John McCauley of Deer Tick, and legendary rock engineer Steve Albini- LIFERS is the first album from Local H in five years, and the release coincides with the group's 30 year anniversary (and our collective doom). Physical Orders of the album are available here.

"It feels kind of weird to have a record coming out while all of this is happening. The only thing that I've ever seen that's been anything close to this is 9/11. Our fourth record was supposed to come out that month in 2001, but after THAT day it got pushed back to the following year. Tour dates got cancelled. A bunch of s got shut down. At the time, those delays and setbacks felt like everything. Like it was the worst thing that could happen to us. It was childish and more than a little selfish - and I'm ashamed to admit that I even felt that way.

And now, even MORE s has been shut down. More people are going to be directly affected. And what's worse, we can't gather together and try to make sense of it - not in the way we used to be able to. We can't go out and see our friends. Most of us can't even visit our families. On top of that, people are losing their jobs. People are losing their LIVES. So once again, I'm a little ashamed. I'm ashamed to ask anybody to pretend that our little fing record means anything in this time of great and collective tragedy.

But you know what? If nothing else, sticking to the schedule and insisting on releasing this record on time has certainly helped keep US sane. All the small mundane tasks that go into promoting a new record -the bios, the interviews, the FaceStagram updates and TwitTube posts (ESPECIALLY when we can't play live in front of actual people!) -that's been a lifeline for us. It's given us a reason to get out of bed. Maybe it's not much, but it's something. And we're grateful for it. We're also grateful for the feedback that we've received and the sense of connection that it's given us. Even if it's been transmitted through a screen - it's felt real. (And we surely can't be the only band out there that's felt like this.)

Photo Credit: John Oakes


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