San Diego Opera's 'Pagliacci' Stands On Its Own

Related: San Diego Opera, Pagliacci, Leoncavallo, Andrew Sinclair, Frank Porretta, Adina Nitescu, Stephen Powell

This season's San Diego Opera Opening Night incited passion, drama, and nonstop thrills for the audience. The festive atmosphere at the Civic Theatre provided the perfect complement for the exciting intensity of one of opera's grittiest dramas, Pagliacci.

The first opera to be written in nineteenth century verismo style, Pagliacci reflected an actual incident in the childhood of its composer, Ruggero Leoncavallo. The boy's magistrate father adjudicated the case of an actor who killed his wife while they performed on stage. The event touched the composer deeply enough to inspire him to write what became his best known opera. Usually paired with another one-act opera such as Pietro Mascagni's Cavalleria Rusticana, this Pagliacci worked beautifully on its own.

Director Andrew Sinclair, a favorite at SDO since his debut in 2000 and veteran of productions from Tosca to Aida (see my interview with him at: http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwopera/article/BWW-Interviews-Catharsis-Raw-Emotion-and-Tears-San-Diego-Opera-Director-Andrew-Sinclair-Talks-Opera-20140120), delivered a rendering that was true to this opera's stark, graphically violent nature. He probed the depths of his characters' neuroses and weaknesses in this grim tale without resorting to melodrama or excess, intensifying the intrigue with creative techniques. Staging a pantomime between Nedda and Beppe during the Intermezzo and giving the final shocking line, "La Commedia è finita," to baritone Tonio instead of the tenor protagonist Canio, were among the devices used to add poignancy and edginess to the already violent plotline. All of the lead singers managed to cut through the massive, almost Wagnerian orchestration with impressive robustness and energy.

Having debuted at SDO as the Duke in Rigoletto, tenor Frank Porretta gave an aggressive and multidimensional performance as the beleaguered clown Canio, alternating between dominance over his consort Nedda, abject self-pity, and helpless surrender to his inevitable fate. Vocally powerful, Porretta proved himself capable of mastering roles such as Radames, Otello and Calàf, which he has performed in major opera houses throughout the world.

Internationally recognized soprano Adina Nitescu is known for her impressive interpretations of such opera heroines as Tosca and Cio-Cio San. In her SDO debut, she created the perfect foil for Porretta's Canio. Her temperamental, fiery rendering of Nedda convincingly portrayed her inner conflict, torn as she was between her duty to Canio and her inexplicable desire to take flight like the birds winging through the skies. Her imposing voice seemed a bit heavy for this role, but was a worthy match for Porretta's powerful instrument.

Stephen Powell (interview at: http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwopera/article/BWW-Interviews-Doing-What-He-Wants-To-Do-Stephen-Powell-In-San-Diego-Operas-PAGLIACCI-20140120), who debuted in SDO's Turandot in 1997 and has also performed here in the world premiere of The Conquistador, has sung at the Met Opera and other major houses in this hemisphere, and later this season will appear with Los Angeles Opera. In his first ever appearance in the role of Tonio, he captured the audience's attention with his vocal beauty and brilliance from the opening note of the difficult Prologue - a tour-de-force for any baritone - to his final, "La Commedia è finita!" His highly nuanced rendering of the tormented hunchback vividly presented the dark, conflicted character's desires for love and revenge, toying with the audience's sympathies, or lack thereof, depending on the circumstances.




More On: San Diego Opera, Pagliacci, Leoncavallo, Andrew Sinclair, Frank Porretta, Adina Nitescu, Stephen Powell



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Erica Miner Violinist turned author ERICA MINER has had a multi-faceted career as an award-winning

screenwriter, author, lecturer and poet. A native of Detroit, she studied violin at Boston

University with Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Joseph Silverstein, where she

graduated cum laude; the New England Conservatory of Music, and the Tanglewood Music Center, summer home of the Boston Symphony, where she performed with such celebrated conductors as Leonard Bernstein. She continued her studies with Mr. Silverstein at the New England Conservatory of Music, and went on to perform with the prestigious Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for twenty-one years, where she worked closely with much-respected maestro James Levine and numerous other luminaries of the opera world.

After retiring from the Met, Erica drew upon her lifelong love for writing as her creative outlet and studied screenwriting in Los Angeles with screenplay guru Linda Seger. Erica?s screenplays awards include such recognized competitions as Santa Fe and the Writer?s Digest. Her debut novel, TRAVELS WITH MY LOVERS, won the Fiction Prize in the Direct from the Author Book Awards. Subsequent published novels include the first in Erica?s FOUREVER FRIENDS novel series chronicling four teenage girls coming of age in the volatile 60s. Her suspense thriller MURDER IN THE PIT, a novel of assassination and intrigue at the Metropolitan Opera, has won rave reviews across the board.

Erica?s lectures, seminars and workshops have received kudos throughout California and the Pacific Northwest, and she has won top ratings as a special lecturer for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines. An active contributor to OperaPulse.com (http://www.operapulse.com/author/ericaminer/) and LAOpus.com (http://www.laopus.com/search/label/Erica), she also contributed a monthly ?Power of Journaling? article series for the National Association of Baby Boomer Women newsletter (http://nabbw.com/expert-columns/books-and-authoring/journaling/the-power-of-

journaling-part-2/). Other writings have appeared in Vision Magazine, WORD San Diego,

Istanbul Our City, and numerous E-zines. Erica?s lecture topics include ?The Art of Self- Re-invention,? ?Journaling: the Write Way to Write Fiction,? ?Solving the Mystery of Mystery Writing,? and ?Opera Meets Hollywood.? Details about Erica?s novels, screenplays and lectures can be found on her website (http://www.ericaminer.com.



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