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BWW Interviews: Catharsis, Raw Emotion and Tears: San Diego Opera Director Andrew Sinclair Talks Opera

Related: Andrew Sinclair, San Diego Opera, Pagliacci, Zandra Rhodes, Covent Garden, Aida, Latonia Moore, Felliini, Verdi,

BWW Interviews: Catharsis, Raw Emotion and Tears: San Diego Opera Director Andrew Sinclair Talks Opera

Veteran opera director Andrew Sinclair, director of this season's opening San Diego Opera production, Leoncavallo's Pagliacci, knows what makes opera tick. In this interview, he shares his wisdom about the true guts of opera: catharsis, raw emotion, and tears.

EM: What a delight to meet you. I've heard such great things about you from people who have worked with you at SDO. I know you're a favorite here. I interviewed Zandra Rhodes last season. She spoke so highly of you. What fun to do Aida with her in that splendid production.

AS: She's absolutely wonderful. And I love this company.

EM: They love you. Of all the many productions you've done here, do you have any favorites?

AS: That's hard, because I don't think I've ever had a bad experience with this company. I think it says a lot about the company and the singers it employs. I particularly enjoyed doing Tosca, partly because it's one of my absolutely favorite operas. The construction of the piece is really so perfect. The length of the acts, the way the drama is driven, and the music of course is fabulous. I've had a lot of association with Tosca in other parts of the world. It also was interesting for me to do Maria Stuarda, a piece I'm very fond of. The Pearl Fishers was a big challenge. It's very beautiful music but it's an extremely bad libretto. I had to really think of something to make that work. It wasn't just me, it was Zandra and John Malashock as well, that made it into a dramatic piece. Of course we've done it thirteen times in various parts of the country. But as I said I've never had a bad experience here.

EM: Which opera has been the most difficult? Pearl Fishers had its challenges, but what about Lohengrin?

AS: Lohengrin was a production I already knew because it came from Covent Garden, and actually - this is going to really date me - I was the original stage manager when the production was new. Then I became assistant director and came back to the opera house freelance to assist on a revival. I've directed my own productions of Lohengrin elsewhere in the world. It's hard because there are a lot of people involved. People said, well, they just come on stage and they stand. But they all have to react. And it's actually that background which brings the whole picture to life, so in terms of numbers, that's hard. Aida's hard. I've done two different Aidas here, and again it's the numbers of people. When I was asked to do it last year I said I'd done two before and didn't want to do any more because it's a lot of work with very little reward for a director.

EM: So moving so many people about the stage...?

BWW Interviews: Catharsis, Raw Emotion and Tears: San Diego Opera Director Andrew Sinclair Talks Opera

AS: Moving people about the stage is not in any way rewarding, I can tell you (laughs). It has its own sort of private hell. But Ian (Campbell, SDO General Director) asked me to do it and because it was Ian and this company's been very good to me, I agreed. And I'm really glad I did, actually, because I found something new about Aida. It's basically a very intimate piece. And it's a victim of that one big scene. Everyone says, "Oh, well, you can have horses, you can have camels..." Horses, elephants, camels, it's about people. And my problem had always been with Aida herself.

EM: The character?

AS: Yes. Because we know what she is from what she tells you. She's an Ethiopian princess who's been captured, and the first time we see her is as a slave. Somehow for me that image never goes away. And the music (sings from the Prelude) is very beautiful but it's very sad, very wistful. And I thought, I have to find a way to make Aida strong. We had a wonderful Aida in Latonia Moore, marvelous. So I decided I was going to put her in the Prelude. So that you saw this proud woman.

EM: Yes, I loved that.

AS: Then we discover she's having an affair with a member of the enemy army. And you have a conflict. Then it becomes interesting. We had a great Amneris in Jill Grove. We'd done the boudoir scene one day, and I said, "How much do you think they confide in each other?" She said, "I don't really think so. She's a slave, a princess, she doesn't want anything to be known about her." I said, "Why don't we look at it this way. Imagine you're both princesses, which in its way brings a certain loneliness because of your rank. Your countries are at war with each other. So really the person you've become closest to, as Amneris, could be your own personal slave. Why don't we just have a conversation as Aida and Amneris talking one day." And so they started. Jill said, "Aida, do you have a boyfriend?" "Well, I did back in Ethiopia, but I don't know if he's around anymore. What about you, Amneris?" "Well, there's somebody I like a lot and I think he likes me..." So this went on, and we established a relationship between Amneris and Aida, which makes apparent betrayal by Aida greater for Amneris. We did the scene again and it was totally different, it was amazing.

EM: That's brilliant. There's nothing like a little "improv" to get the juices flowing.

AS: Latonia's done Aida a lot. But every time she comes to rehearsal she rehearses as if it's her first, and gives the same energy. So I came away thinking, yes, I wouldn't mind doing Aida again now because having gone down that road I don't think I've quite finished with it.

EM: So there's always a different approach.

AS: Yes, and that's where we're very lucky. Because often we get to do pieces more than once. I've done Lohengrin a lot, Lucia, Butterfly, Bohème. Now this will be my tenth Pagliacci. And it's very different from the first time I did it. I think the way I'm doing it here is different from the way they're used to singing it. People think of it as a sweet little troupe doing a sweet little show which goes wrong. We're playing it about people who are at a stage in their lives where life is pretty grim. My own feeling about Canio is that possibly he was very talented and started to have a career and either the drink got to him first or it was the nerves that made him drink, but for whatever reason...

EM: Before he knew his wife was unfaithful?

AS: Absolutely. And I don't necessarily think Nedda is his wife. He calls her "sposa" - if you look at the wonderful black and white Fellini film, La Strada, it tells the story of Canio and Nedda in a very different way. So Canio is now doing these traveling shows and the only money they earn is from when they perform. I think Canio is a very good man, he gave this hunchback Tonio a job when nobody else would. He says to Nedda, "I found you a starving orphan on the street and took you in and gave you a name. And my love." Then there's Beppe who I think possibly ran away from home to join the Circus. So if we try and think back about these characters and what their history might have been, it does tell us quite a lot of what's going on. Canio is under tremendous pressure, I think. Which the others don't realize necessarily. And clearly they've been here before in this village - the chorus sings, 'Ritornanno' - and they're favorites. Also as in La Strada, gradually the female character starts to become the principal character everybody loves and everybody laughs at more than the star of the show. She's very loved, men come up at the end of the performance, and women, and congratulate her. So perhaps Canio subconsciously is getting resentful about that, and becomes incredibly jealous.

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About Author

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Erica Miner Violinist turned author ERICA MINER has had a multi-faceted career as an award-winning

screenwriter, author, lecturer and poet. A native of Detroit, she studied violin at Boston

University with Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Joseph Silverstein, where she

graduated cum laude; the New England Conservatory of Music, and the Tanglewood Music Center, summer home of the Boston Symphony, where she performed with such celebrated conductors as Leonard Bernstein. She continued her studies with Mr. Silverstein at the New England Conservatory of Music, and went on to perform with the prestigious Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for twenty-one years, where she worked closely with much-respected maestro James Levine and numerous other luminaries of the opera world.

After retiring from the Met, Erica drew upon her lifelong love for writing as her creative outlet and studied screenwriting in Los Angeles with screenplay guru Linda Seger. Erica?s screenplays awards include such recognized competitions as Santa Fe and the Writer?s Digest. Her debut novel, TRAVELS WITH MY LOVERS, won the Fiction Prize in the Direct from the Author Book Awards. Subsequent published novels include the first in Erica?s FOUREVER FRIENDS novel series chronicling four teenage girls coming of age in the volatile 60s. Her suspense thriller MURDER IN THE PIT, a novel of assassination and intrigue at the Metropolitan Opera, has won rave reviews across the board.

Erica?s lectures, seminars and workshops have received kudos throughout California and the Pacific Northwest, and she has won top ratings as a special lecturer for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines. An active contributor to OperaPulse.com (http://www.operapulse.com/author/ericaminer/) and LAOpus.com (http://www.laopus.com/search/label/Erica), she also contributed a monthly ?Power of Journaling? article series for the National Association of Baby Boomer Women newsletter (http://nabbw.com/expert-columns/books-and-authoring/journaling/the-power-of-

journaling-part-2/). Other writings have appeared in Vision Magazine, WORD San Diego,

Istanbul Our City, and numerous E-zines. Erica?s lecture topics include ?The Art of Self- Re-invention,? ?Journaling: the Write Way to Write Fiction,? ?Solving the Mystery of Mystery Writing,? and ?Opera Meets Hollywood.? Details about Erica?s novels, screenplays and lectures can be found on her website (http://www.ericaminer.com.



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