BWW INTERVIEW: GOOD DOG Director Rachel Chant And Performer Justin Amankwah Sat Down And Asked Each Other Questions Ahead Of Opening Night at KXT

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BWW INTERVIEW: GOOD DOG Director Rachel Chant And Performer Justin Amankwah Sat Down And Asked Each Other Questions Ahead Of Opening Night at KXT

GOOD DOG Director Rachel Chant And Performer Justin Amankwah Sat Down And Asked Each Other Questions Ahead Of Opening Night at KXT

Rachel Chant:

Why is this play important to you?

I think it's important for us to question what it is to be 'good', the constructs that tell us what 'goodness' is, the cost and rewards of being 'good', and how we navigate what on Earth 'good' actually is. This play is a beautifully lyrical coming of age story that interrogates these ideas not just through the eyes of one boy, but through the stories of a whole community, how they navigate it both together and as individuals.

What are you excited for the audience to experience?

The incredible work that our design team are doing. And spending time in a theatre with Justin Amankwah. It's a treat.

What scares you about the work?

Doing justice to Arinze's beautiful script, to the story he's telling, and to these characters. Arinze's woven an incredible tapestry of lives within this one monologue, and it feels like a privilege to meet them all through the boy's eyes.

Favourite part of the process?

Uncovering hidden Easter eggs within the script every day. Just when we think we've found them all, out comes another. And seeing how many Harry Potter references I can make in my direction that have zero meaning to Justin, then trying to find another pop culture reference to replace it.

Cats or dogs?

Dogs. Definitely dogs. Mel, our sound designer, is an unbiased animal lover, and looking across to her during any mention of animals during the play is a little show in itself.

Justin Amankwah:

Why is this play important to you?

This play for me perfectly depicts the world we think we know as children and the one we come to know as we grow up. Essentially, growing up is hard and the relatability of this play is proof that we're not alone in our struggles and that's why it's important to me.

What are you excited for the audience to experience?

The text is super poetic and rhythmic at times, and I'm really excited to have that subtlety sneak up on the audience .

What scares you about the work?

It's quite the job, so there's a lot that I'm scared about if I'm being honest. But the scariest part is certainly doing the text justice, and portraying the boy and his area with integrity and steering away from Stereotypes. But of course, I'm getting a lot of help with this in the room so that fear is slowly easing out of me.

Favourite part of the process?

My favourite part of the process is definitely playing on the set. I find it adds so much more to what you think you already know about the character.

Your last meal?

And my last meal was breakfast ?

Had two crumpets with peanut butter & honey + a black tea

GOOD DOG by Arinze Kene opens on 1 November 2019 at Kings Cross Theatre and runs till 16 November.

Performance Times: Tuesday - Saturday 7:30pm, Sunday 5:00pm

Running time: 80 minutes no interval

http://www.kingsxtheatre.com/good-dog



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From This Author Jade Kops