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Eight Stories To Enrich And Deepen Passover Now Available Online From Jewish Women's Theatre

Eight Stories To Enrich And Deepen Passover Now Available Online From Jewish Women's Theatre

The eight days of Passover will be different this year for millions of Jews throughout the world. Recognizing the need to come together in new ways, Jewish Women's Theatre (JWT) will post one archived Passover story online each day from April 8 to April 15.

These stories, pulled from more than 500 pieces collected during the past twelve years and written by an impressive array of distinguished authors, will be performed by JWT actors. Designed to entertain, they also provide seedlings for fruitful discussions about what Passover has meant to members of the diverse international Jewish community.

The link to these stories will be sent to everyone on JWT's mailing list each of the eight mornings of Passover. Those who wish to receive them who are not currently on JWT's mailing list may sign up at www.jewishwomenstheatre.org/news or they can view each story at www.jewishwomenstheatre.org/insideourtime which updates with each new piece once they are released.

"This is the first time JWT has put its stories online," said Ronda Spinak, JWT's Artistic Director. "We felt that given our desire to connect the community and to offer something of value, we gathered some of our best Passover stories that will take viewers to Egypt, the former Soviet Union, Morocco, Poland and other locations in the 'Old Country.' We think these stories will help make Passover come alive across the generations."

Inside Our Time Producer and JWT's Assistant Artistic Director Andrew Fromer adds, "Through their computers, smartphones, and Smart TVs, our patrons can play these video clips throughout their seder, especially during Maggid, the section dedicated to telling the story of Passover! Consider these pieces modern interpretations of our freedom from slavery, putting forth thought-provoking questions sure to provide delicious dinner-time discussions for seder-goers of all ages."

Viewers will meet Rabbi Deborah Silver, who wonders why a modern woman must scrub her oven of hametz just because a bunch of ancient men dictated a search-and-destroy mission for any food that contains even a trace of wheat, barley, rye, or oats. They will also hear from a mother who finds modern-day lice plague in the hair of her very clean son, as well as a story from a seder guest who recalls how her cousin David's pranks about Elijah are remembered every year, even though David is long gone.

Moving internationally, André Aciman, the celebrated Egyptian-born author of Call Me by Your Name, writes about his last night in Egypt when his family held a seder even though his father lost his factory and was about to be arrested the next day. He wanders the streets of Alexandria and experiences "street fellowship" as his Arab neighbors offer him a forbidden pancake made of almonds, syrup, and raisins. As he debates whether to eat it during Passover, he realizes all that he will miss, as his family is forced to begin the next chapter of their lives in the diaspora.

There is also a story from a Jew living in the former Soviet Union, where all religions were outlawed in favor of "state atheism." And David Suissa, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the Jewish Journal in Los Angeles, writes about growing up in Morocco, where Jews and Arabs joined together each year to celebrate Mimouna, the last night of Passover.

And keeping with the theme of diversity, there is a touching story by the father of an autistic son who was not welcome at the family's seder because the hosting grandparents did not want their seder to be interrupted by their grandson's antics. Instead of agreeing to a pared-down second-night seder, they decide to hold their own inclusive celebration, where all are invited.

In addition to Aciman, Silver, and Suissa, there will be stories from Natasha Michelle Basley, Barbara Trainin Blank, Marc Littman, Renee Moilanen, and Lisa Pearl Rosenbaum, all accomplished writers.

Actors include JWT favorites and Abby Freeman Artists-in-Residence Annie Korzen, AJ Meijer, Kate Zentall, Nadége August, and Rosie Moss, all of whom have graced The Braid stage, television, film screens, and theatres across the country. Other members you will see of JWT's esteemed actors in the community include Tiffany Mualem, Nicole Lipp, Michael Naishtut, and Josh T. Ryan.

Jewish Women's Theatre has been voted one of the "Best Live Theatres on the Westside" three years in a row by The Argonaut, staging traditional works, contemporary works and educational programming that provide a forum for the development, performance, and showcasing of Jewish artistic talent. Now in its 12th season, JWT's salon theatre of original dramatic shows, each written to a specific theme, displays the diverse and eclectic community of writers, artists, and creators who celebrate Jewish life, one story at a time. Learn more about JWT at: www.jewishwomenstheatre.org.



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