Skip to main content Skip to footer site map

Page: 1



Does anyone know what time actors usually come into the theater for the performance?

nyel24
Chorus Member
joined:4/17/10
Chorus Member
joined:
4/17/10
I wanted to see if anyone knows what time actors usually go into the theaters for their performance that night. I am a huge Dennis Haysbert fan and would love to meet him before he goes into the theater. I can try when the performance is over but would be quite late for me. Any help is greatly appreciated.

backwoodsbarbie Profile Photobackwoodsbarbie Profile Photo
backwoodsbarbie
Broadway Legend
joined:7/31/09
Broadway Legend
joined:
7/31/09
I've always heard anywhere between 2 hours to 1/2 hour before curtain time depending on their warm-up, preparation routine. I remember Kerry Washington saying in an interview that she arrived to the theatre 2 hours before to warm up an do hair/makeup while the men in RACE showed up at 1/2 hour call.
http://backstagebarbie.blogspot.com
bwayphreak234 Profile Photobwayphreak234 Profile Photo
bwayphreak234
Broadway Legend
joined:7/4/10
Broadway Legend
joined:
7/4/10
I know when Tarzan was on Broadway Jenn Gambatese (Jane) got there very late because she did not come on until later in the second act. Most shows will do 2 hours to 1/2 hour early, but it can be different in some cases depending on the role and show.
"There’s nothing quite like the power and the passion of Broadway music. "
singtopher Profile Photosingtopher Profile Photo
singtopher
Broadway Legend
joined:12/28/05
Broadway Legend
joined:
12/28/05
Per union rules, a show cannot call an actor anymore than 1/2 hour before, except in certain cases when an actor has vast amounts of make-up to be applied (e.g. The Monster in Young Frankenstein, Shrek). In those cases, the earlier call time comes out of their weekly rehearsal time.

I'm tired, I hope that made sense.
"If this is going to be a Christian nation that doesn't help the poor, either we have to pretend that Jesus was just as selfish as we are, or we've got to acknowledge that He commanded us to love the poor and serve the needy without condition and then admit that we just don't want to do it." -Stephen Colbert
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
12/5/04
Half hour is mandatory, except in very unusual cases. I'll take the previous poster's word that an actor was allowed to come in after the show started, but I've never heard of a case of that. With dance shows, performers will often come in 1 1/2 hours beforehand in order to properly warm up. I have never heard of anyone coming in any earlier except in the case of extreme make-up. I don't know of anyone who comes in at two hours ahead of time. Due to union rules, they're not allowed onstage, though if they want to warm up vocally, they can go to their dressing rooms at any time that the theater is open with a doorman.

I don't know about Haysbert specifically as this is his Broadway debut, but as a rule, performers do not wish to meet fans on their way into the theater. They are finishing their errands and preparing for the show. Generally, they are much more relaxed and receptive afterwards. It's a short show. I'd recommend you try after. That said, I doubt he arrives any earlier than 1/2 hour. There's no need for him to. I can't imagine why Kerry Washington chose to, if that's so.

Updated On: 7/16/10 at 02:17 AM
PReeves2 Profile PhotoPReeves2 Profile Photo
PReeves2
Leading Actor
joined:3/20/10
Leading Actor
joined:
3/20/10
@ghostlight,

Do the dancers in "dance shows" arrive early and do their own class/warm-up or is class provided to them?
amoni Profile Photoamoni Profile Photo
amoni
Broadway Star
joined:5/17/04
Broadway Star
joined:
5/17/04
"but as a rule, performers do not wish to meet fans on their way into the theater. They are finishing their errands and preparing for the show.

Thanks for the laugh.
morosco Profile Photomorosco Profile Photo
morosco
Broadway Legend
joined:7/10/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
7/10/04
I'll take the previous poster's word that an actor was allowed to come in after the show started, but I've never heard of a case of that.

'tis true. Staggered call time. For an actor who doesn't appear until much later than the start time. (In many instances they are required to phone in at half-hour to let stage management know they are alive and well.)
BrodyFosse123 Profile PhotoBrodyFosse123 Profile Photo
BrodyFosse123
Broadway Legend
joined:2/27/06
Broadway Legend
joined:
2/27/06
Kate Finneran's call time for PROMISES, PROMISES is around 8:30pm since she doesn't appear until the start of Act 2.

And no... there ISN'T a damn class for dancers to warm-up before a performance. Each dancer has his own warm-up regime and each dancer is responsible for his own doings as long as their performance schedule isn't affected.

Does anyone know what time actors usually come into the theater for the per
Does anyone know what time actors usually come into the theater for the per
Phyllis Rogers Stone
Suspended
joined:9/16/07
Suspended
joined:
9/16/07
Good old amoni, bitchy as always!
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
12/5/04
LOL, thanks, Phyl! Amoni's post was a bit of a wtf for me. So, okay, "finishing up their errands and preparing for the show" sometimes means "Oh my god, I'm late, better get to the sign-up sheet before the the SM writes me up for not making 1/2 hour" while scarfing down dinner, but otherwise, in my experience, most actors would rather see fans after than before.

Thanks, too, to morosco. I'd heard the term "staggered call" but have just never run across that situation.

"Do the dancers in "dance shows" arrive early and do their own class/warm-up or is class provided to them?"

"there ISN'T a damn class for dancers to warm-up before a performance. Each dancer has his own warm-up regime and each dancer is responsible for his own doings as long as their performance schedule isn't affected."


Well, PReeves, what BrodyFosse says simply isn't always so. A case in point that immediately comes to mind is the A Chorus Line revival, where for around the first six months of the show, Baayork Lee had gotten dispensation from other unions to hold a rather strenuous class/warm-up onstage before every show. It isn't an isolated case.



Updated On: 7/16/10 at 10:35 AM
PReeves2 Profile PhotoPReeves2 Profile Photo
PReeves2
Leading Actor
joined:3/20/10
Leading Actor
joined:
3/20/10
thanks ghostlight. I only asked because most dance companies require and/or offer a class prior to every performance.
winston89 Profile Photowinston89 Profile Photo
winston89
Broadway Legend
joined:6/18/06
Broadway Legend
joined:
6/18/06
You can show up earlier then the half hour call time. As it was said, performers who have a lot of makeup often do so to get ready for the show. Another example of those characters who are makeup heavy would be The Phantom in Phantom Of The Opera. If I recall correctly, the actor performing the role usually comes in an hour prior to showtime.

And yes, it is generally considered rude to stage door prior tothe show.
"If you try to shag my husband while I am still alive, I will shove the art of motorcycle maintenance up your rancid little Cu**. That's a good dear" Tom Stoppard's Rock N Roll
Rathnait62 Profile PhotoRathnait62 Profile Photo
Rathnait62
Broadway Legend
joined:6/3/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
6/3/04
It depends on about a million things. In shows where there were a million people in one dressing room, I liked to come in as late as I possibly could to still be ready on time but without having to be in that room more than necessary. When doing musicals, I prefer to warm up at home. Last year I was in an off-Broadway play, was the first person onstage, and had to be wigged for that first scene. I liked to be there at least an hour before. If I had had a quieter dressing room situation, I probably would have been there even earlier. In December I was in a musical with a cast of 119, but we had a gymnasium as a green room/dressing room, so there was plenty of room to relax and get ready. I was always there at least an hour before as well, although I dressed/made up mostly at home. The atmosphere in the green room itself was a great way to set the mood for the show for me.

Everyone is different, and every show/role is different. Some actors consistently have trouble getting themselves to work by 7:30 p.m., oddly enough.
Have I ever shown you my Shattered Dreams box? It's in my Disappointment Closet. - Marge Simpson
nyel24
Chorus Member
joined:4/17/10
Chorus Member
joined:
4/17/10
Thank you for all your responses. After thinking about it I do believe meeting an actor before a performance would be bad form so I will try after a performance. I actually did see Dianne Wiest once before she got into the theater for her performance in All my Sons but I just said hi and opened the door for me. I felt bad bothering her before she was going to work.
WayTooBroadway Profile PhotoWayTooBroadway Profile Photo
WayTooBroadway
Broadway Star
joined:1/11/10
Broadway Star
joined:
1/11/10
Voluntary rehearsals make me think of this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxY9Hm85Lsw
"When the audience comes in, it changes the temperature of what you've written." -Stephen Sondheim