BWW Review: American Ballet Theatre Offers a New Production of John Cranko's EUGENE ONEGIN, Courtesy of the National Ballet of Canada

BWW Review: American Ballet Theatre Offers a New Production of John Cranko's EUGENE ONEGIN, Courtesy of the National Ballet of Canada

BWW Review: American Ballet Theatre Offers a New Production of John Cranko's EUGENE ONEGIN, Courtesy of the National Ballet of Canada

John Cranko's Eugene Onegin is often referred to as a "story ballet for grown-ups" since it is devoid of the fantasy birds and other magical creatures that populate so much of the classical ballet canon. The dancers portray real people with real emotions as Cranko brings to life Alexander Pushkin's iconic verse novel. Cranko's version of the tale has new plot twists that some critics have found dismaying while others have applauded them. I fall into the latter category. On the evening of June 21st 2017 at the Metropolitan Opera House in Lincoln Center, I was especially moved at the end of the ballet when the now-married heroine, Tatiana, succeeds in fending off the advances of Onegin, who had spurned her when she was a young girl. Onegin flees in defeat although in the original poem, Tatiana is the one who leaves. Kudos to Cranko for what I see a more female-empowering scenario.

Onegin had its World Premiere by the Stuttgart Ballet in 1965, and ABT premiered a production of Onegin in 2001. The 2017 ABT production, with a run of eight performances, is a new one courtesy of the National Ballet of Canada supervised by Reid Anderson and staged by Jane Bourne, with lush sets and costumes by Santo Loquasto and evocative lighting by James F. Ingalls that effectively take the audience to the world of Imperial Russia.

The music by Tchaikovsky, arranged and orchestrated by Kurt-Heinz Stolze, is a compilation of selections of the composer's work that most often works to advance the tension and drama of the story line. Full disclosure: Before seeing this production, I had in my mind the glorious music by Tchaikovsky for the opera about Onegin for which the composer wrote the libretto. I must not be the only one, since I read in Allan Ullrich's 2016 review of the San Francisco Ballet production of Eugene Onegin the following passage: "Always lurking in the background is the great Tchaikovsky opera, 'Eugene Onegin'." Ulrich was referring to the story line, but for me it's the opera's music that is "always lurking in the background".


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Sondra Forsyth Sondra Forsyth is Editor-in-Chief of Broadway World Dance. A National Magazine Award winner and a member of Dance Critics Association, she founded Ballet Ambassadors in New York City and was the Artistic Director for 16 years with support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Currently, she teaches ballet and pointe at Ovations Dance Academy on Long Island and is the Ballet Mistress of Ovations Dance Repertory Company. Sondra has served as a guest teacher for the American Ballet Theatre open classes and on the faculty of The School at Steps on Broadway, the Harkness Dance Center of the 92nd Street Y, the Interlochen Center for the Arts, and Studio de Ballet Opera in Beirut, Lebanon. She was Co-Founder and Co-Artistic Director with Jan Hanniford Goetz of the Huntington School of Ballet and the Huntington Ballet Theatre on Long Island. Sondra is also Co-Editor-in-Chief of thirdAGE.com and formerly held the posts of Executive Editor at Ladies? Home Journal, Features Editor at Cosmopolitan, and Articles Editor at Bride?s. Sondra?s byline has appeared in Dance Magazine and Dance Teacher as well as many major publications. She is the author or co-author of twelve books and holds an M.A. from Harvard.