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The Moon Is Blue - 1951 - Broadway

Schedule

Henry Miller's Theatre

(New York, NY)
124 West 43rd St.
Category:
by Julie Musbach - Oct 26, 2018
Baryshnikov Arts Center (BAC) announces the naming of its Studio 4B for the great American entertainer, actor, singer, and comedian Danny Kaye (1911-1987) and his wife Sylvia Fine Kaye (1913-1991), an accomplished lyricist, composer, and producer who mostly collaborated with her husband, writing material that he performed. The dedication completes the naming of all of BAC's studios and theaters for gifted artists, friends and/or mentors to Founder and Artistic Director Mikhail Baryshnikov-a roster that includes philanthropist Howard Gilman; artists Jerome Robbins, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Rudolf Nureyev; and BAC's founding managing director emerita, Christina Sterner.
by Mary Hanrahan - Mar 18, 2010
David Niven (1910-1983) was an actor of such diverse talents and charm that he is often categorized using clichéd phrases like 'urbane light comedian' or 'leading man.' These descriptions are indeed accurate, but one does not survive before the camera for a half-century on charm alone. The problem-if you can call it that-is that Niven made it all look too easy. Like Phileas Fogg in Around the World in 80 Days, he took everything in stride, unflappably and (seemingly) effortlessly playing his part, always prepared for whatever came his way. He was, after all, originally a military man by profession. He then chose to 'bum' around America, eventually winding up in Hollywood. Just as his film career began to blossom, he was one of the first to answer Britain's call when World War II broke out, serving on active duty for the duration and rising to the rank of colonel. He even made two propaganda films during brief leaves, including The Way Ahead, which is included in this series. After making his return in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's masterpiece A Matter of Life and Death (Stairway to Heaven), he resumed a glorious career in film, theater, television, and writing with his typical debonair insouciance. This series aims to recapture some of the special glory that was David Niven.
by BWW News Desk - Aug 10, 2005
Barbara Bel Geddes, who originated the role of Maggie the Cat in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and who played Miss Ellie on 'Dallas,' passed away on August 8th at the age of 82
by BWW News Desk - Apr 23, 2010
David Niven (1910-1983) was an actor of such diverse talents and charm that he is often categorized using clichéd phrases like 'urbane light comedian' or 'leading man.' These descriptions are indeed accurate, but one does not survive before the camera for a half-century on charm alone. The problem-if you can call it that-is that Niven made it all look too easy. Like Phileas Fogg in Around the World in 80 Days, he took everything in stride, unflappably and (seemingly) effortlessly playing his part, always prepared for whatever came his way. He was, after all, originally a military man by profession. He then chose to 'bum' around America, eventually winding up in Hollywood. Just as his film career began to blossom, he was one of the first to answer Britain's call when World War II broke out, serving on active duty for the duration and rising to the rank of colonel. He even made two propaganda films during brief leaves, including The Way Ahead, which is included in this series. After making his return in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's masterpiece A Matter of Life and Death (Stairway to Heaven), he resumed a glorious career in film, theater, television, and writing with his typical debonair insouciance. This series aims to recapture some of the special glory that was David Niven.
by Stephi Wild - Apr 17, 2021
Singer Jill Corey, an overnight sensation in 1953, when she landed on the cover of Life Magazine, passed away from natural causes on April 3 at UPMC Sunnyside in Sunnyside, PA.  She was 85. 
by BWW News Desk - Apr 17, 2010
David Niven (1910-1983) was an actor of such diverse talents and charm that he is often categorized using clichéd phrases like 'urbane light comedian' or 'leading man.' These descriptions are indeed accurate, but one does not survive before the camera for a half-century on charm alone. The problem-if you can call it that-is that Niven made it all look too easy. Like Phileas Fogg in Around the World in 80 Days, he took everything in stride, unflappably and (seemingly) effortlessly playing his part, always prepared for whatever came his way. He was, after all, originally a military man by profession. He then chose to 'bum' around America, eventually winding up in Hollywood. Just as his film career began to blossom, he was one of the first to answer Britain's call when World War II broke out, serving on active duty for the duration and rising to the rank of colonel. He even made two propaganda films during brief leaves, including The Way Ahead, which is included in this series. After making his return in Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's masterpiece A Matter of Life and Death (Stairway to Heaven), he resumed a glorious career in film, theater, television, and writing with his typical debonair insouciance. This series aims to recapture some of the special glory that was David Niven.