Amy Bradley

Amy Bradley

 Through the years, Amy Bradley has been able to be apart of live theatre on stage and off.  She started out volunteering locally at Sam Bass Community Theater before heading to New York City to study at The New York Conservatory For Dramatic Arts, the school for Film and Television. While in NYC, Amy worked on stage with the Afrikan Woman’s Repertory Theater, behind the scenes with Wide Eyed Productions and reviewed Off Broadway shows for nytheatre.com. Her passion and commitment helped bring new works to life from the ground up working with fresh ideas and fresh playwrights. She eventually went on to direct a collection of David Ive’s shows, A Mystery at Twicknam Vicarage and Babel in Arms, at the 14th Street Theater with the support of her colleagues at Wide Eye Theater Productions. After completing her acting education, Amy returned to Austin TX and continues her passion for the arts behind the scenes - always looking for her next project. 




MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

BWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TXBWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TX
Posted: Jul. 27, 2017


LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TXBWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TX
Posted: Jul. 27, 2017


BWW Review: THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Marries Tradition and Contemporary OperaBWW Review: THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Marries Tradition and Contemporary Opera
Posted: Feb. 14, 2017


BWW Review: THE FLYING DUTCHMAN Vanishes Too Quickly from Austin, TXBWW Review: THE FLYING DUTCHMAN Vanishes Too Quickly from Austin, TX
Posted: Nov. 17, 2016


BWW Review: TexARTS Examines the Meaning of A FEW GOOD MEN in Lakeway, TXBWW Review: TexARTS Examines the Meaning of A FEW GOOD MEN in Lakeway, TX
Posted: Oct. 14, 2016


BWW Review: Sky Candy's AGENT ANDROMEDA: THE ORION CRUSADE Dazzles at Daring Heights in East AustinBWW Review: Sky Candy's AGENT ANDROMEDA: THE ORION CRUSADE Dazzles
Posted: Sep. 19, 2016


BBW Review: THE NORMAL HEART Highlights a community's struggle at The City TheatreBBW Review: THE NORMAL HEART Highlights a community's struggle at The City Theatre
Posted: Jul. 13, 2017


BWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TXBWW Review: AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Darkly Delivers Laughs at The City Theatre in Austin, TX
July 27, 2017

Few modern plays have experienced the immediate love and adoration Tracy Letts garnished from her 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning dark comedy, AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY. Originally premiering at the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago close to a decade ago, the story of the dysfunctional Weston family has travelled beyond the mid-western plains they call home. After secluding themselves inside their home to nurse a nasty pill and alcohol addiction, Beverly Weston, the family patriarch, goes missing for five days. The family's desperate search brings the Westons and their skeletons together again. Violet Weston, Beverly's wife, displays her intense pill dependency and cruel disposition while her daughters try to piece together where their father may be. As the story develops, the mystery of Beverly's whereabouts are brought to light, while simultaneously highlighting the disturbing reality of the Weston's existence. AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY examines the portrait people present of a modern family and tests the boundaries of sympathy.

BBW Review: THE NORMAL HEART Highlights a community's struggle at The City TheatreBBW Review: THE NORMAL HEART Highlights a community's struggle at The City Theatre
July 13, 2017

The City Theatre Company presents Larry Kramer's THE NORMAL HEART, with compassion and care to the tragic subject matter. This mostly autobiographical tale from Kramer, shines a light on the HIV crisis that hit the gay community in New York City in the early eighties. With the horrifying illness gaining steam, and compounded by little to no cooperation from the community at large, the newly liberated 'gay movement' was stonewalled and devastated by the effects of the AIDS virus. To tell the story of his own experience during this plague, Larry Kramer puts his experiences to paper to share the heart-wrenching realities many homosexual communities faced during this time. At the helm of the activism is an outspoken, abrasive crusader Ned Weeks (a self-reflection of Larry Kramer). THE NORMAL HEART begins in a hospital waiting room with a few young men trading quips back and forth that all will be well. Within minutes, we discover all is not well, and the true villain of the show, the HIV virus, is about to take center stage in these happy young men's lives. Weeks is adamant about finding help for his crusade and passionately tells his fellow peers to 'button it up' for the time being. The timeline of the show follows the rising death toll of the AIDS virus from all over the world. As events escalate, Ned's personal relationships fall victim to his passionate and outlandish tactics in seeking support for their cause. The reflection and passion written by Kramer is nothing shy of breath-taking. With an emphasis on awareness and education, THE NORMAL HEART stays relevant and interesting for the present-day theatre-goer.

BWW Review: NUNSENSE Irreverently entertains at The City Theatre in Austin, TXBWW Review: NUNSENSE Irreverently entertains at The City Theatre in Austin, TX
May 17, 2017

The somewhat obscure 1985 musical NUNSENSE, is now playing at The City Theatre on the east side of Austin. Holding the title of the second longest-running Off-Broadway show in history, NUNSENSE will delight all audiences, but has the best entertainment value for the catholic-lite audience. Taking place in Mount Saint Helen's School auditorium in New Jersey, the Little Sisters of Hoboken were once a missionary order that ran a leper colony on an island south of France. After their mission went sour, they travel back to their convent in Hoboken, looking for a fresh start. The children of God then discover Sister Julia has accidentally killed the other fifty-two residents with a bad batch of the french soup vichyssoise. The nuns then raise enough money to bury all the late sisters through selling, what would be assumed, religiously quipped greeting cards. However, Mother Superior used part of their earnings to purchase a big screen television. Leaving her compatriots with four of the fifty-two sisters frosting in their freezer, until they can find the money to properly bury them. This premise causes the ladies to host a variety show in Mount Saint Helen's School auditorium to raise the money to put their frozen friends to rest. The five remaining collection of sisters have individual character traits as defining as the saints of the Bible. Loaded with audience participation, tap numbers and nuns with an odd perspective of their religious values, NUNSENSE is an entertaining vaudevillian-style musical with songs large and small.

BWW Review: MY BIG FAT BAHOOKIE Tackles the Human Experience in Austin, TXBWW Review: MY BIG FAT BAHOOKIE Tackles the Human Experience in Austin, TX
May 5, 2017

Currently playing at The Vortex Theatre, MY BIG FAT BAHOOKIE challenges the treatment and attitude our modern culture has towards people who 'dont fit inside the box'. The box being no big fat 'bahookies'. This original work is written, directed and narrated by Lorella Loftus. The Vortex Theatre is known for their avant-garde flair - this original work delivers on this historical style of theatre. As the audience enters the theatre, you become a supportive member of the 'No More Diest Club'. The stage is open and welcoming, showcasing a projection modeled after pantaloons, and reversible stage inserts to maneuver throughout the show. The feeling in the room was lively and exceptionally supportive right off the bat. As a member of the 'No More Diets Club', as is the expectation with other clubs dealing with hard hitting issues, the scenes are played out with focus on the 'fat' experience. These experiences we all can relate to with doctors, lovers and most importantly emphasized, the massive diet industry. Journey through the actors experiences, and the truly shocking revelations the show uncovers about the human experience.

BWW Review: THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Marries Tradition and Contemporary OperaBWW Review: THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Marries Tradition and Contemporary Opera
February 14, 2017

Austin Opera's second show this season, THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT welcomes Marie (performed by Rachele Gilmore) and 1,500 adopted fathers known as the 21st Regiment. The Long Center's stage is vast, however the regiment is fabulously represented by a chorus of 30 men with sergeant Sulpice at the helm. In the mountains of Tyrolean, Marie's journey to happiness is a mixture of Annie Get Your Gun and My Fair Lady with a French twist. Marie is rough around the edges, understandable for any young woman raised by a regiment of soldiers. However, after she meets the charming Tonio (performed by Rene Barbera), her 'fathers' discover he is a member of the enemy and literally drag him away. Marie's heart is true, as she wants to keep her word to marry a member of the regiment ( we will put aside the fact that they are all her father), despite her young love and affection for Tonio.

BWW Review: SEND ME NO FLOWERS Lulls Audiences in Leander, TXBWW Review: SEND ME NO FLOWERS Lulls Audiences in Leander, TX
January 27, 2017

Now playing at Way Off Broadway Community Players Theatre, SEND ME NO FLOWERS is the third show in this community theatre's platinum season. Twenty years ago, with the spark of a Library fundraiser in mind, a cast of community players came together in Leander Texas to perform for the betterment of their community. Now celebrating their 20th season, their longevity is an artistic feat their passionate contributors take pride in. SEND ME NO FLOWERS, mostly known for its cinematic success starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson, was first performed on stage in 1960. Writers Norman Barasch and Carroll Moore received modest reviews along with this shows initial 40 performances. Their hilarious story of the Kimball's did not see major success until the cinematic rendition by Julius J Epstein, brought this American comedy to the big screen. George Kimball (locally played by Bill Craig) is the picture of health to anyone you ask, except him. Living day to day as a functioning hypochondriac, George lives happily with his wife Judy Kimball (played by Tracy Cathey) in their quant 1950's neighborhood in Westchester New York. In a scene of happenstance, George overhears his physician speaking about a fatally ill patient, and in this misunderstanding, believes the sick party to be himself. The story of the Kimball's navigating this hilarious premiss continues over three acts, with the choices and stakes trading between Mr. and Mrs. Kimball scene to scene.

BWW Review: BLOOMSDAY Reminisces with Audiences in Austin, TXBWW Review: BLOOMSDAY Reminisces with Audiences in Austin, TX
January 20, 2017

Currently playing at The Austin Playhouse, BLOOMSDAY is story of love oddly intertwined with the James Joyce's novel, Ulysses. Written by the University of Texas Faculty member Steven Dietz, the play's experimental style and arc is reminiscent of Tony Kushner's fabulously entertaining Angels in America. Taking place over the course of 35 years, Robert and Caithleen meet as fleeting youngsters looking for purpose. The purpose of their meeting is that of the title, BLOOMSDAY. For audience members ignorant to the reference, BLOOMSDAY takes place on June 16th as a day of celebration for acclaimed Irish author, James Joyce. It is observed annually in Dublin, where fans and drunkards alike, traditionally dressed in early 1900s garb, march through Dublin following the events and more specifically the scenes of the famous book, Ulysses. The play BLOOMSDAY however, tells the story of young Robbie (played by Aaron Johnson) and Caithleen (played by Claire Grasso) meeting on a tour during the march of Bloomsday. With time itself being the 5th character of the show, Robert (played by Huck Huckaby) scolds his younger self, while Cait (played by Cindy Williams) wrestles with her slipping mind and preparing her younger self for what is to come. The subtle quips and honest reflections from the future selves make for hilarious interactions on stage. Taking place over 35 years, but set within actual two scenes, the arc of the characters and exquisite writing by Steven Dietz, displays a realistic love story forcing introspection.

BWW Review: IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE Delights Christmas Enthusiasts in Round Rock, TXBWW Review: IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE Delights Christmas Enthusiasts in Round Rock, TX
December 8, 2016

Back by popular demand, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE sparkles in the quaint performance space of Old Settler's Hall. Festively located next to Round Rock's "Christmas Towne", IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE provides more of an experience than a traditional retelling of everyone's favorite classic Christmas Story. Adapted from the beloved radio play / broadcast, the Penfold Theatre Company has brought this adaptation back to life, with magical elements the whole family will enjoy. Setting the stage in a quiet and whimsical hall, the audience is transported to 1946 as members of KPNF radio station. Back then family members gathered around the hearth to listen to the classic Christmas cast. For those unfamiliar with this sweet story, see George Bailey (played by Penfold Artistic Director Ryan Crowder), a man who, through fateful circumstances, gave up his dreams of traveling the world for the good of the people in his hometown Bedford Falls. A slew of events catapults Bailey onto a bridge contemplating suicide on Christmas Eve. What happens between his birth and George's contemplation of death, are the subject of the plot. This shines a light on the many struggles of humanity and brings into focus the humility the holiday season harkens from an individual.

BWW Review: THE FLYING DUTCHMAN Vanishes Too Quickly from Austin, TXBWW Review: THE FLYING DUTCHMAN Vanishes Too Quickly from Austin, TX
November 17, 2016

Presented during The Austin's Opera's 30th anniversary season, THE FLYING DUTCHMAN commands the historic Long Center's stage with a diverse, collective cast and belting operatic sequences. The origins of the story of The Flying Dutchman are rather skewed between timelines. The story first appeared in Travels in various parts Europe, Asia, and Africa in 1790 by John MacDonald, and again when Richard Wagner's operatic rendition came to life in 1843, after being adapted from an episode of Heinrich Heine's satirical novel The Memoirs of Mister von Schnabelewopski. More modernly, the story of The Flying Dutchman is told through the highly loved film series, The Pirates of The Carribean. Regardless of the interpretations by creative minds, one fact remains true - The Flying Dutchman refers to a ghostly ship destined to sail the seas for all eternity. Richard Wagner's rendition, sure to please both critics and audiences alike, is bringing this haunted tale to life with the reputation of precision that precedes The Austin Opera.

BWW Review: TexARTS Examines the Meaning of A FEW GOOD MEN in Lakeway, TXBWW Review: TexARTS Examines the Meaning of A FEW GOOD MEN in Lakeway, TX
October 14, 2016

Currently playing in Lakeway, Texas, Aaron Sorkin's original work A FEW GOOD MEN has been brought to life, as part of at TexARTS Academy's Professional Series. The average person recognizes this title based on its Oscar acclaim as a Best Picture nominee, and infamous line referencing ones inability to handle the truth. But in fact, A FEW GOOD MEN has a more subtle beginning based on a conversation Sorkin had with his sister regarding her time in Cuba, at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. Premiering in 1989, and then adapted for screen a few years later, this play highlights an unlikely scenario between young men defending their honor and country while taking a hazing ritual too far. This courtroom drama introduces the audience to the military mindset, through chants and marches, and the responsibility involved with following orders without question. While investigating what seems like a 'cut and dry' case, a high level conspiracy is uncovered with regards to two young marines being charged with murder. As the story unravels, the audience can piece together the timeline and key facts the lawyers are desperately searching for within the case. TexARTs presents this play with high brow sophistication, without alienating members who have not served in the military but might have caught an episode of Law & Order.

BWW Review: Georgetown Palace at the Playhouse Theatre Brings the Classic ARSENIC AND OLD LACE to the StageBWW Review: Georgetown Palace at the Playhouse Theatre Brings the Classic ARSENIC AND OLD LACE to the Stage
October 2, 2016

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE by American playwright Joseph Kesselring, is a classic staple for modern Theatre enthusiasts. Taking into account the context of the political humor and dark comedy, it is hard to believe this show was first brought to the stage in 1941. A New York Times review of it's opening night stated the play was, 'so funny that none of us will ever forget it.' Best known for it's film of the same decade, this adaptation stars Cary Grant and is directed by the celebrated Frank Capra. After hitting the big screen, this dark comedic farce has been brought to a much wider audience and became a local theatre favorite.

BWW Review: Sky Candy's AGENT ANDROMEDA: THE ORION CRUSADE Dazzles at Daring Heights in East AustinBWW Review: Sky Candy's AGENT ANDROMEDA: THE ORION CRUSADE Dazzles at Daring Heights in East Austin
September 19, 2016

Sky Candy presents AGENT ANDROMEDA: THE ORION CRUSADE, this show is a fantastic out of this world experience currently blasting off at Sky Candy aerial and circus studio in East Austin. Written by Reina Hardy, this vaudevillian style show delights while adding cheeky commentary reminiscent of The Rocky Horror Picture Show set in space. Setting the premise with three young girls enjoying a girl power comic, Agent Andromeda, the show rises into space with a sex positive, racy adventure to find 'The Overflowing Chalice'. Heightening this sexy adventure, director Rudy Ramirez appropriately uses the actors bodies as props in aerial segments that are pure amazement. This aspect of the show takes off with the entry of The Dark Queen (played by Shannon Grounds), who through her folly of racing Agent Andromeda (played by Caroline Poe) to the overflowing chalice, thoroughly and hysterically abuses her comrades. Love triangles are introduced, sexualities defined and simultaneously questioned.

BWW Review: William Shakespeare's THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Entertains at Austin's Historic Scottish Rite TheatreBWW Review: William Shakespeare's THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Entertains at Austin's Historic Scottish Rite Theatre
September 6, 2016

Now playing in Austin's oldest playhouse, The Scottish Rite Theater, THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR delights theatre goers with its gender-bending cast and lively performance. Austin's Scottish Rite Theater is a most appropriate venue for such a play to be presented, giving the audience a passage through time within the Masonic grand hall adorned with decorative antiques around the house. THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, written by none other than William Shakespeare, commands any space with a high level of detail, and Scottish Rite Theater fits the bill. Given the historic nature of the theater itself, first opening in 1871 as a German Opera house, the play THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR was interestingly first published 269 years prior. The historic location introduces the audience immediately into another age and lends to the other worldly tone of the play's presentation. The experience within this show begins before the lights are up on the stage - a group of 'merry' players entertain the excited audience as they file in to find their seats. A bar, The Garter Inn, has an innkeeper polishing glassware as would any restauranteur on a Sunday afternoon. The mood is set well by The Weird Sisters Women's Theater Collective and when the curtain rises, the audience can disconnect and journey back into 15th century England.

BWW Review: POSTVILLE Exposes Cultural Clash in Small Town AmericaBWW Review: POSTVILLE Exposes Cultural Clash in Small Town America
August 9, 2016

Currently running at the Trinity Street Baptist Church, Last Act Theatre Company, in partnership with Austin Jewish Repertory Theatre, present POSTVILLE, a project sponsored by Austin Creative Alliance. POSTVILLE is a fictional work, based on actual events in the town of Postville, IA written by playwright, Don Fried. The script was adapted from the original book Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America, written by Stephen G. Bloom. Although the events in the story are based in reality, the people, places, and things in the play are indeed fictitious.

BWW Review: Vive Les Arts Theatre Pursues the Magic of MARY POPPINS in Killeen, TXBWW Review: Vive Les Arts Theatre Pursues the Magic of MARY POPPINS in Killeen, TX
July 28, 2016

The community driven, Vive Les Arts Theatre located in Killeen Texas, brings to life MARY POPPINS, in Vive Les Arts self-proclaimed "huge summer musical". We all know the traditional Mary Poppins story of family, discipline, and chimney sweeps, yet, however familiar this tale is, it's always refreshening to revisit the Banks on Cherry Tree Lane. Beginning with Bert (played by John Asbach), everyone's favorite chimney sweep, setting the scene for Jane (played by Joy Adams) and Michael (played by Jonathan Dominguez), as they adventure with Mary Poppins (played by Heidi Lewis) through the streets of turn of the century England. As two very misbehaved children, their distracted mother Winifred Banks (played by Carlie Jo Hill) can't seem to keep a nanny for longer than a few weeks. Adding insult to injury, George Banks (played by Jeremy Stallings) is a classic distracted father aloof and unconcerned with his family. George places value on his money more than anything, showing the audience that adults have lessons to learn as well. As the winds change, Marry Poppins storms in without notice, and begins teaching the children that, "anything is possible if you let it". The journey continues with moving statues and larger than life set pieces that add a new and different spin to this timeless classic directed by Hayley Dugger. Presented in front of a buzzing community audience, the cast of MARY POPPINS entertained the locals with their adaptation of this joyful musical.

BWW Review: PRIVACY SETTINGS: A PROMETHEAN TALE Dares Audiences to Question What is Happening Behind The ScreenBWW Review: PRIVACY SETTINGS: A PROMETHEAN TALE Dares Audiences to Question What is Happening Behind The Screen
June 3, 2016

Standing in line at The Vortex to see PRIVACY SETTINGS: A PROMETHEAN TALE was like watching a one-act play in and of itself. Each patron crammed into the hot box office to retrieve tickets, hand over their phone number, and sign an agreement before viewing Heather Garfield's latest conceived work. I watched in surprise as the well-rehearsed box office workers recited, 'Leave your phone on,' and 'If someone calls or texts you, answer it during the show'. Definitely, this was the first time I have ever been told to turn my ringer up during a performance. Challenging the status-quo seemed like the mission, the further I got in line. To my surprise, a woman and her husband actually refused to sign the document and provide their information. Consequently, they left in a huff and I admired the level of commitment this theater has to it's theatrical vision - regardless if it is disagreeable to some patrons. I happily signed, knowing well my status as a Broadway World reviewer would most likely mean my phone number would be selected. Needless to say, within 15 minutes of the show starting, I received a text to stand and read aloud to the audience. It was definitely exciting, and I could see others in the audience checking their phones to see if they also had received covert instructions. This element shows the level of avant-garde theater being produced at The Vortex, even before entering the house.

BWW Review: LONE RIDERS Explores the Wild West in Austin, TXBWW Review: LONE RIDERS Explores the Wild West in Austin, TX
May 18, 2016

Trinity Street Players invites audiences to slow down and admire the old west in their latest production, LONE RIDERS, within the quaint blackbox at the First Austin Baptist Church. This original work, written by Carol Wright Krause and directed by Manuel Zarate, hopefully will survive its first workshop unscathed. Traditionally, during workshop productions, the writing and direction are experimental - meaning quite possibly audiences can only see this original work in its current form once. During this preliminary malleable phase of any show, daring production companies like Trinity Street Players introduce something that literally has never been seen before. This sense of adventure is linked to the spirit and theme of LONE RIDERS. The intimate cast of players and the wonderful guitar stylings of Walker Lyle, take you on their adventure forcing self-reflection of individuals' motives and point of view.

BWW Review: ONE SLIGHT HITCH Courts The 80's in Austin TexasBWW Review: ONE SLIGHT HITCH Courts The 80's in Austin Texas
May 12, 2016

Making it's regional debut in Austin TX, Paradox Players delights Austinites with ONE SLIGHT HITCH. Performed at the quaint and appropriate location of the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin at Howson Hall Theater, Bethke Stage, director Matthew Burnett executes this patronizing patriarchy prancing about the stage. Begging the audience to remember what their living room looked like in the 80's -this farce, written by the funny man himself Lewis Black, delivers on comic diversity as it toggles between with laugh out loud jokes and sophisticatedly written puns about the culture and atmosphere surrounding the era of mall-rats. It's the summer of 1981 - and the conservative Colemans, who are naturally from Cincinnati, are preparing for their daughter Courtney's wedding. Conveniently located in their backyard, Delia (played by Mary Kennelly) runs around madly with a clipboard making sure all details have been accounted for and that nothing ruins this very special day! Alas, the doorbell rings and all hell breaks loose. In the Reagan era of a picture-perfect family, when the internet had not yet given us knowledge of just about everything, we watch as the day unravels into the unexpected comedy Lewis Black intended.

BWW Review: DEAD MAN WALKING Shines Light into the Darkness in Georgetown, TXBWW Review: DEAD MAN WALKING Shines Light into the Darkness in Georgetown, TX
April 27, 2016

The Sarofim School of Fine Arts Department of Theatre presents DEAD MAN WALKING at the creative theatre in the round stage known as Jesse H. and Mary Gibbs Jones Theater. Located in the heart of Georgetown, Texas and more specifically, Southwestern University, director Kathleen Juhl gathers students to tell a tale of a very unlikable young man watching the clock of his life run out. Set in 1970's Louisiana, the audience is transported through the stories of intolerance rather than scenery. Opening with a bare stage, some chairs, and a simple platform, the play begins with Sister Helen Prejean (played my Ally Oliphint) curious and nonjudgemental about her questionable surroundings in "the projects". Soon, she is asked by a local priest to visit a man on death row, and with some hesitation, she goes against the advice of her peers and ventures to the prison. With the bars and jail represented through creative cross lighting and distance, Matthew Poncelet (played by Dillon Betros) awaits, like a lion waiting for prey. The young man facing the last week of his life comes alive in his berating and tempting of Sister Prejean to abandon him through his brutish and ignorant dialogue. This stands in contrast with Sister Prejean's attempts to humanize a convicted murderer and rapist, as she is on a mission of religious guidance and tolerance, and not wanting to pass judgement.

BWW Review: DURANG DURANG Entertains Theatre-lovers in East AustinBWW Review: DURANG DURANG Entertains Theatre-lovers in East Austin
April 19, 2016

DURANG DURANG, written by the historical theatre writer/director/actor Christopher Durang, is a farce presented by Oh Dragon Theatre Company. Directed by Dillon Yruegas, presents a creatively staged and lively cast of players to a curious group of onlookers trying to piece together what the collection of stories and scenes mean. True to the theatre company's message of "creating authentic performance in both new and classic works", DURANG DURANG does not disappoint. The writing style of Christopher Durang is a key element in bringing his plays to life, specifically within the genre of comedy. In the unconventional type of story telling that theater-goers expect from Mr. Durang, this show uses a collection of explosive parody and entertaining scenes, which are presented through farce and energetic execution by the cast. The scenes consist of 6 short one-acts presented with the solid 7 players. They represent unapologetic theatrical references that theatre fans will enjoy - understanding the punchline to the inside jokes. The endearing and exasperating scenes help some members shine and leave others trying to stay afloat. This cheerfully profane and crass comedy will confuse and excite the audience members trying to make sense of the farce.



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