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Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Announces Winter Season

Winter digital season runs January 14 – March 26, 2021.

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Announces Winter Season

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center has announced its Winter 2021 Digital Season, with 26 new digital offerings, available for free, from January 14 to March 26, 2021. CMS introduces a new online schedule in January, with concerts premiering Thursday evenings and educational and conversational programs premiering on Monday evenings. The series of weekly family programming continues on Friday mornings.

On Thursdays, CMS presents new digital concerts: newly-curated concerts drawn from the vast CMS HD-video archive and newly-recorded performances created for CMS. On Monday evenings, CMS offers seminars and hybrid performance-and-discussion programs, live from (or recently taped in) the Rose Studio on the Lincoln Center campus. CMS's online series for families, Inspector Pulse at Home, continues airing Friday mornings at 11 am. CMS continues to emphasize creativity and flexibility as it develops new approaches to programming, with the goal of bringing music, musicians, composers and audiences closer, even while the pandemic keeps concert halls from serving as a gathering place for musicians and music lovers.

David Finckel and Wu Han, CMS co-artistic directors, describe the winter offerings as "a warm blanket that covers the year's coldest months with chamber music. We invite viewers to partake of content that casts bright lights on chamber music from diverse perspectives. And on Friday mornings, bring the kids."

Concerts, Thursdays at 7:30

The seven CMS Mainstage presentations are full-length concerts comprised of performances drawn from the CMS archive. David Finckel and Wu Han curate each concert to highlight a composer, time period, mood, or theme to provide audiences the opportunity to hear the performances anew. Concert titles such as "Enchanting Serenades" (January 14th), "Roaring Twenties Masterworks" (February 11th), and "Bartók and Beethoven" (March 18th) offer a glimpse into the breadth and depth of the programs on offer. The CMS Artist Series returns on January 28 to delve into the work of flutist Tara Helen O'Connor, with archival performances of music by Mozart, Reinecke, JacobTV and Françaix, as well as a newly-created documentary film about the artist. The International Quartets series continues on February 18 with a newly-recorded concert from the Schumann Quartet from Germany, which participated last season in CMS's Bowers Program for emerging musicians.

"Surrounding our seven Mainstage concerts," Finckel continues, "is a plethora of events for music lovers of all ages and experience. Without leaving home, audiences can enjoy chamber music in all its infinite depth, astounding variety, and inspiring beauty, in the hands of musicians who are preserving CMS's commitment to artistic excellence unabated through today's challenging times."

Lectures and Seminars, Mondays at 7:30 pm

The Musical Heritage series, perfect for those interested in music history, explores the musical legacies of towering figures in classical music through exceptional conversations with the artist's students and colleagues along with film clips, historical photos and relevant documents. This unique webinar series is streamed for free, and each episode is available on-demand on the CMS website through Friday of the week following its premiere. On January 25, Philip Setzer hosts an evening devoted to the legendary violinist Oscar Shumsky (1917-2000) with Ida Kavafian, Eugene Drucker and the violinist's son, Eric Shumsky. On February 22, the Calidore Quartet hosts an exploration of the Guarneri Quartet, with very special guests Arnold Steinhardt, first violinist and founding member of the Guarneri, together with Peter Wiley and John Dalley of the Guarneri Quartet. Steinhardt is the author of Indivisible by Four (2000), about the Quartet, and Violin Dreams (2008), a memoir. On March 18, Paul Neubauer and Aaron Boyd host an evening celebrating William Primrose (1904-1982), the Scottish violist and teacher who is universally revered as the greatest violist who ever lived.

The Art of Interpretation series, which combines discussion and performance elements, delves into great works from the perspective of the musicians. The series reveals how artists arrive at their interpretations of specific musical passages and give audiences a sense of the artists' process as they prepare to perform a piece of music. On February 2, pianists Alessio Bax and Lucille Chung perform and discuss two works - one by Debussy and the other by Stravinsky - for Piano, Four Hands. On March 1, violinist James Thompson (who was recently selected for CMS's Bowers Program for emerging artists) joins two chamber music veterans, violist Paul Neubauer and cellist Paul Watkins, to discuss and perform Mozart's Divertimento in E-flat major. And on March 22, violinist Chad Hoopes and pianist Anne-Marie McDermott explore and perform works by Mendelssohn, Mozart and Debussy.

New Music Series

CMS's two music series devoted to contemporary composers and their work, Composers In Focus and New Milestones, continue through the winter and spring seasons. Composers In Focus welcomes Jessie Montgomery on March 8 (changed from March 9); she talks with musicians who know her work, and they share insights and perspectives. New Milestones, which is primarily a concert experience, explores and unpacks the work of a wide-ranging selection of international composers. The concert on February 4 presents work by Dai Fujikura, Alvin Singleton, Eleanor Alberga and Olivier Messiaen; on March 11 the works performed are by Andreia Pinto Correia, Jessie Montgomery, Tōru Takemitsu and Alejandro Viñao.

For Families, Fridays at 11:00 am

And, for families, CMS rolls out eight more episodes of its hugely popular free, fun and educational video series, Inspector Pulse@Home, adapted from the long-running Meet the Music programs at Alice Tully Hall. Inspector Pulse, the world's greatest and only "Private Ear" (aka Bruce Adolphe, CMS's Resident Lecturer and Director of Family Programs) unlocks the mysteries and joys of music-making, exploring music fundamentals -- meter, scales, harmony, inspiration - through funny stories, puns, and a bit of mayhem. During February and March, a new episode premieres every Friday at 11 am, and is then available on-demand.


Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
Digital Season, January to March, 2021

*Newly recorded performance
**Live online performance
All others have been drawn from the CMS Archive

All programs are streamed for free and available for one week, beginning on the date of the premiere.

Mainstage: Enchanting Serenades
Thursday, January 14, 7:30 pm

Dohnányi Serenade in C major for Violin, Viola, and Cello, Op. 10 (1902)
Arnaud Sussmann, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Paul Watkins, cello

Wolf Italian Serenade for String Quartet (1887)
Orion String Quartet (Todd Phillips, Daniel Phillips, violin; Steven Tenenbom, viola; Timothy Eddy, cello)

--INTERMISSION (Discussion with artists)--

Beethoven Serenade in D major for Violin, Viola, and Cello, Op. 8 (1796-97)
Francisco Fullana, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Mihai Marica, cello


Mainstage: Young Ideas/Parting Thoughts
Thursday, January 21, 7:30 pm

Beethoven Sonata in E-flat major for Violin and Piano, Op. 12, No. 3 (1797-98)
Ida Kavafian, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

Dutilleux Sonatine for Flute and Piano (1943)
Ransom Wilson, flute; Juho Pohjonen, piano

--INTERMISSION (discussion with the artists)--

Mendelssohn Quartet in F minor for Strings, Op. 80 (1847)
Schumann Quartet (Erik Schumann, Ken Schumann, violin; Liisa Randalu, viola; Mark Schumann, cello)


Musical Heritage: Oscar Shumsky
Monday, January 25, 7:30 pm
Live Webinar

Founding Emerson String Quartet member Philip Setzer, who was a student of Shumsky, hosts an evening devoted to the legendary violinist Oscar Shumsky (1917-2000). Fellow Shumsky students Ida Kavafian and Eugene Drucker, with special guest Eric Shumsky, the violinist's viola-playing son, come together for an in-depth exploration of Shumsky's life, and the relatively undiscovered violin playing of a master often compared only to Heifetz and Kreisler.

The Musical Heritage series explores the musical legacies and influences of towering figures in classical music through exceptional conversations with the artist's students and colleagues along with film clips, historical photos and relevant documents.


Artist Series: Tara Helen O'Connor
Thursday, January 28, 7:30 pm

Mozart Quartet in D major for Flute, Violin, Viola, and Cello, K. 285 (1777)
Tara Helen O'Connor, flute; Benjamin Beilman, violin; Richard O'Neill, viola; Keith Robinson, cello

Reinecke Sonata in E minor for Flute and Piano, Op. 167, "Undine" (1882)
Tara Helen O'Connor, flute; Pedja Muzijevic, piano

--INTERMISSION (Q&A with the artist)--

JacobTV Lipstick for Flute/Alto Flute and Soundtrack (1998)
Tara Helen O'Connor, flute

Françaix L'heure du berger for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon, Horn, and Piano (1947)
Tara Helen O'Connor, flute; Stephen Taylor, oboe; Sebastian Manz, clarinet; Peter Kolkay, bassoon; Radovan Vlatkovic, horn; Michael Brown, piano

Art of Interpretation: Debussy and Stravinsky
Monday, February 1, 7:30 pm
Live from the Rose Studio

The husband and wife duo piano team of Alessio Bax and Lucille Chung perform and discuss two incomparable works for piano, four hands. The compositional wizardry and unsurpassed creativity of both Debussy and Stravinsky (who were good friends) ushered in music's modern age, and all of their gifts to the art are on full display in this rich and colorful program.

The Art of Interpretation series combines discussion and performance elements to delve into great works from the perspective of the musicians. The series reveals how artists arrive at their interpretations of specific musical passages and gives audiences a sense of the artists' process as they prepare to perform a piece of music.

**Debussy Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune for Piano, Four Hands (arr. Ravel) (1892-94, arr. 1910)
Alessio Bax, Lucille Chung, piano

**Stravinsky Petrushka for Piano, Four Hands (1910-11, rev. 1947)
Alessio Bax, Lucille Chung, piano


New Milestones 2: Space (Liminality in Line)
Thursday, February 4, 7:30 pm

*Dai Fujikura Turtle Totem for Clarinet (2019)
Anthony McGill, clarinet

*Alvin Singleton Jasper Drag for Clarinet, Violin, and Piano (2000)
Anthony McGill, Chad Hoopes, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

*Eleanor Alberga "Duo" from Dancing with the Shadow for Clarinet and Piano (1990)
Anthony McGill, clarinet; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

*Olivier Messiaen "Louange à l'immortalité de Jésus" from Quatuor pour la fin du temps for Violin and Piano (1940-41)
Chad Hoopes, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano


Mainstage: Roaring Twenties Masterworks
Thursday, February 11, 7:30 pm

Ravel Sonata for Violin and Piano (1923-27)
Benjamin Beilman, violin; Alessio Bax, piano

--INTERMISSION (Discussion with artists)--

Korngold Suite for Piano Left Hand, Two Violins, and Cello, Op. 23 (1930)
Wu Qian, piano; Danbi Um, Sean Lee, violin; Mihai Marica, cello


International Quartet Series: Schumann Quartet
Thursday, February 18, 7:30 pm
Pre-Recorded "Live" in Germany

*Tchaikovsky Quartet No. 1 in D major for Strings, Op. 11 (1871)
Schumann Quartet (Erik Schumann, Ken Schumann, violin; Liisa Randalu, viola; Mark Schumann, cello)

*Schumann Quartet in A major for Strings, Op. 41, No. 3 (1842)
Schumann Quartet (Erik Schumann, Ken Schumann, violin; Liisa Randalu, viola; Mark Schumann, cello)


Musical Heritage: Guarneri Quartet
Monday, February 22, 7:30 pm
Live Webinar

The Calidore Quartet hosts an exploration of the immortal Guarneri Quartet, whose sea-changing artistry spanned a 45-year career of international touring and definitive recordings. The Calidore Quartet, once mentored by the Guarneri, is joined for this in-depth look at the Guarneri by very special guests: the Guarneri's founding first violinist Arnold Steinhardt, along with Guarneri's cellist, Peter Wiley, and founding second violinist, John Dalley.

The Musical Heritage series explores the musical legacies and influences of towering figures in classical music through exceptional conversations with the artist's students and colleagues along with film clips, historical photos and relevant documents.


Mainstage: Modern Voices
Thursday, February 25, 7:30 pm

Scriabin Selected Preludes (arr. for Clarinet and Piano) (1894-95, arr. 1986)
Anthony McGill, clarinet; Gloria Chien, piano

Debussy Quartet in G minor for Strings, Op. 10 (1893)
Escher String Quartet (Adam Barnett-Hart, Brendan Speltz, violin; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello)

--INTERMISSION (discussion with the artists)--

Shostakovich From Jewish Folk Poetry for Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Piano, Op. 79 (1948)
Mané Galoyan, soprano; Sara Couden, alto; Miles Mykkanen, tenor; Gilbert Kalish, piano

Paul Neubauer (Photo: Tristan Cook)
Paul Watkins (Photo: Cherylynn Tsushima)
James Thompson (Photo: Carlin Ma)

Art of Interpretation: Mozart's Divertimento for String Trio
Monday, March 1, 7:30 pm
Live from the Rose Studio

Violinist James Thompson, who was recently selected for CMS's Bowers Program for emerging artists, joins two chamber music veterans, violist Paul Neubauer and cellist Paul Watkins, to discuss and perform Mozart's Divertimento in E-flat major. Mozart's six-movement string trio is universally considered to be miraculous: the finest work of its genre, a masterpiece of unparalleled ingenuity and beauty, and an eternal joy for listeners and performers alike.

The Art of Interpretation series combines discussion and performance elements to delve into great works from the perspective of the musicians. The series reveals how artists arrive at their interpretations of specific musical passages and gives audiences a sense of the artists' process as they prepare to perform a piece of music.

Mozart Divertimento in E-flat major for Violin, Viola, and Cello, K. 563 (1788)
James Thompson, violin; Paul Neubauer, viola; Paul Watkins, cello


Mainstage: Through Schubert
Monday, March 4, 7:30 pm

Haydn Quartet in C major for Strings, Hob. III: 57, Op. 54, No. 2 (1788)
Danish String Quartet (Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, Frederik Øland, violin; Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello)

Schubert Selected Songs for Voice and Piano
Der Musensohn, D. 764, Op. 92, No. 1
Ganymed, D. 544, Op. 19, No. 3
Willkommenund Abschied, D. 767, Op. 56, No. 1
Nikolay Borchev, baritone, Gilbert Kalish, piano

--INTERMISSION (discussion with the artists)--

Schubert "Auf dem Strom" for Voice, Horn, and Piano, D. 943, Op. 119 (1828)
Nicholas Phan, tenor; Radovan Vlatković, horn; Gloria Chien, piano

Mendelssohn Lied ohne Worte in D major for Cello and Piano, Op. 109 (1845)
Jakob Koranyi, cello; Inon Barnatan, piano

Brahms Selected Hungarian Dances for Piano, Four Hands (1868, 1880)
Wu Han, Michael Brown, piano


Composers In Focus: Jessie Montgomery
Monday, March 8, 6:30 pm
Live conversation with pre-recorded performance

Composer and violinist Jessie Montgomery talks with violinist Benjamin Beilman and cellist Nicholas Canellakis about how her work weaves classical music together with elements of vernacular music, improvisation, language, and social justice and what it means to be composer-in-residence for the Sphinx Virtuosi. They also take some time to focus on her work Duo for Violin and Cello, which Montgomery calls an "ode to friendship."

*Montgomery Duo for Violin and Cello (2018)
Benjamin Beilman, violin; Nicholas Canellakis, cello


New Milestones 3: Scope (Dichotomy and Range)
Thursday, March 11, 7:30 pm

*Andreia Pinto Correia Três quadros de Vieira da Silva/Fragmentos Múltiplos for Violin and Viola (2009)
Benjamin Beilman, violin; Matthew Lipman, viola

Tōru Takemitsu Rain Tree for Percussion Trio (1981)
Ayano Kataoka, Christopher Froh, Ian David Rosenbaum, percussion

*Jessie Montgomery Duo for Violin and Cello (2018)
Benjamin Beilman, violin; Nicholas Canellakis, cello

*Alejandro Viñao Formas del Viento for Flute and Percussion (2008)
Tara Helen O'Connor, flute; Ian David Rosenbaum, percussion


Musical Heritage: William Primrose
Monday, March 15, 7:30 pm
Live Webinar

Violist Paul Neubauer and violinist Aaron Boyd host an evening celebrating William Primrose (1904-1982), the Scottish violist and teacher who is universally revered as the greatest violist who ever lived. Primrose's solo and chamber music recordings attest unequivocally that he was, in fact, the only violist who could "keep up" with Heifetz, and his playing truly has to be heard to be believed.

The Musical Heritage series explores the musical legacies of towering figures in classical music through exceptional conversations with the artist's students and colleagues along with film clips, historical photos and relevant documents.


Mainstage: Bartók and Beethoven
Thursday, March 18, 7:30 pm

Bartók Contrasts for Violin, Clarinet, and Piano (1938)
Alexi Kenney, violin; Sebastian Manz, clarinet; Alessio Bax, piano

Bartók Román népi táncok (Romanian Folk Dances) for Strings, BB 76 (1915, arr. 1917)
Daniel Hope, Jessica Lee, Alexander Sitkovetsky, Benny Kim, Danbi Um, Bella Hristova, violin; Hsin-Yun Huang, Mark Holloway, viola; Daniel McDonough, Keith Robinson, cello; Anthony Manzo, bass

--INTERMISSION (discussion with the artists)--

Beethoven Quintet in C major for Two Violins, Two Violas, and Cello, Op. 29 (1801)
Cho-Liang Lin, Kristin Lee, violin; Mark Holloway, John Largess, viola; Gary Hoffman, cello


Art of Interpretation: Mendelssohn, Mozart and Debussy
Monday, March 22, 7:30 pm
Live from the Rose Studio

Violinist Chad Hoopes and pianist Anne-Marie McDermott celebrate a new duo collaboration with this recital and discussion of wide-ranging music by masters from three ages. The program features a rarely-heard violin sonata by Mendelssohn, one of his earliest works.

The Art of Interpretation series combines discussion and performance elements to delve into great works from the perspective of the musicians. The series reveals how artists arrive at their interpretations of specific musical passages and gives audiences a sense of the artists' process as they prepare to perform a piece of music.

Mendelssohn Sonata in F minor for Violin and Piano, Op. 4 (1823)
Chad Hoopes, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

Mozart Sonata in C major for Violin and Piano, K. 296 (1778)
Chad Hoopes, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano

Debussy Sonata for Violin and Piano (1916-17)
Chad Hoopes, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano


Mainstage: In Earnest
Thursday, March 25, 7:30 pm

Schubert Quartettsatz in C minor for Strings, D. 703 (1820)
Escher String Quartet (Adam Barnett-Hart, Aaron Boyd, violin; Pierre Lapointe, viola; Brook Speltz, cello)

--INTERMISSION (discussion with the artists)--

Tchaikovsky Trio in A minor for Piano, Violin, and Cello, Op. 50 (1881-82)
Gilles Vonsattel, piano; Chad Hoopes, violin; Clive Greensmith, cello

Bruce Adolphe as Inspector Pulse

For Families: Inspector Pulse@Home with Bruce Adolphe

New episodes premiere Fridays at 11 am
Feb 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 26
Programs are available on-demand after the premiere date, at the Inspector Pulse@Home webpage.

The hugely popular free, fun and educational video series, Inspector Pulse@Home, is adapted from the long-running Meet the Music programs at Alice Tully Hall. Inspector Pulse, the world's greatest and only "Private Ear" (aka Bruce Adolphe, CMS's Resident Lecturer and Director of Family Programs) unlocks the mysteries and joys of music-making, exploring music fundamentals -- meter, scales, harmony, inspiration - through funny stories, puns, and a bit of mayhem.

Nothing Accidental!

Friday, February 5, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse accidentally discovers chromaticism! Then he finds out it already existed!

Just a Second!

Friday, February 12, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse examines the whole tone scale and writes music using only that scale! AND he finds out that familiar tunes change completely when played using only whole tones!

Inspiration Exploration!

Friday, February 19, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse investigates the concept of inspiration: he tries to get inspired by various objects (spoon, cup, flower, feather, etc.) and discovers that it has something to do with connecting one thing to another!

Rubato Roboto

Friday, February 26, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse discovers that being a human with feelings is better for music than being a robot that only processes information.

Listening to Colors!

Friday, March 5, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse investigates the different colors on his digital piano! But how can a sound have a color if you can't see it?

Tunes in Disguise!

Friday, March 12, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse figures out that one tune can sound very different in the styles of different composers!

Meter Matters

Friday, March 19, 11:00 am
Inspector Pulse finds out that meter really matters when he plays pieces using the wrong time signatures.

Parallel Universe

Friday, March 26, 11:00 am
Well, okay, not universe. Parallel harmony! Inspector Pulse finds out that parallel harmony is really fun to do.

Photo credit: Lisa-Marie Mazzucco


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