Page: 1

Copyright question.

DofB5
Broadway Legend
joined:5/12/03
Broadway Legend
joined:
5/12/03
Copyright question.#0
Posted: 7/14/04 at 7:13pm
Was just wondering if anyone would know if it is permitted to use an original drawing of a copyrighted character for a charity T-shirt design.

I have been asked to come up with a design for the local chapter of the American Heart Walk. Obviously they would like something with heart theme.

I have a few ideas in mind but one of them involves using the Tin Man from Oz with a caption such as, “Even a Tin Man needs a heart.”

My question being, if I draw a “Tin Man” or use the name “Tin Man” in the caption, would that be a violation of copyright laws?

I have never had to deal with this type of situation before so I am unsure as to who to even ask to get permission (if it is needed). I will not be making any money off it. I would donate the design of whatever I come up just as I did last year.

Many thanks for any help.

D
ShaimanMenkenFan Profile PhotoShaimanMenkenFan Profile Photo
ShaimanMenkenFan
Featured Actor
joined:5/18/04
Featured Actor
joined:
5/18/04
re: Copyright question.#1
Posted: 7/14/04 at 7:17pm
I think the W. W. Denslow's drawings of the "Wizard of Oz" are in the public domain.
Seven and a half cents doesn't buy a hell of a lot!
MargoChanning
Broadway Legend
joined:4/5/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
4/5/04
re: Copyright question.#2
Posted: 7/14/04 at 8:14pm
L. Frank Baum's books are all in the public domain, and so is the character of the "Tin Man." If you came up with your own origial illustration of the Tin Man, you wouldn't need to get anyone's permission and wouldn't violate any copyright. Just be sure to draw something that is consistent with Baum' description of the character and not the MGM movie version of the character, because if your illustration bears too much of a resemblance to Jack Haley in the movie, you might get in trouble with MGM for copyright (and possibly trademark) infringement.
"What a story........ everything but the bloodhounds snappin' at her rear end." -- Birdie [http://margochanning.broadwayworld.com/] "The Devil Be Hittin' Me" -- Whitney
ShaimanMenkenFan Profile PhotoShaimanMenkenFan Profile Photo
ShaimanMenkenFan
Featured Actor
joined:5/18/04
Featured Actor
joined:
5/18/04
re: Copyright question.#3
Posted: 7/14/04 at 8:17pm
Margo I'm not sure but I think he can use Denslow's drawings.
Seven and a half cents doesn't buy a hell of a lot!
MargoChanning
Broadway Legend
joined:4/5/04
Broadway Legend
joined:
4/5/04
re: Copyright question.#4
Posted: 7/14/04 at 8:27pm
You're right -- those would be in the public domain as well.
"What a story........ everything but the bloodhounds snappin' at her rear end." -- Birdie [http://margochanning.broadwayworld.com/] "The Devil Be Hittin' Me" -- Whitney
DofB5
Broadway Legend
joined:5/12/03
Broadway Legend
joined:
5/12/03
re: Copyright question.#5
Posted: 7/14/04 at 9:11pm
Thank you both for the help. Other people on another board are telling me the same thing so I'm guessing it will be alright if I decide to go with that idea.

D
sean martin
Broadway Star
joined:7/4/04
Broadway Star
joined:
7/4/04
re: Copyright question.#6
Posted: 7/14/04 at 9:14pm
Denslow's illustrations were re-copyrighted when the series was republished in mass paperback about ten years ago.

However, you could use the illustrations from some of the other, later books (which are actually better than Denslow's).
"That duck was a sexual toy, and it was on display!" -- an unknown Nashville town leader