The Inheritance - Previews

KingGeorgeIII
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The Inheritance - Previews#126
Posted: 10/7/19 at 5:09pm

Do you think it's worth reading Howards End before seeing this show? Will my appreciation of the play be enhanced if I read it? 

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givesmevoice
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The Inheritance - Previews#127
Posted: 10/7/19 at 7:47pm
I think it’s just worth reading Howards End. It’s a brilliant and beautiful book.
When I see the phrase "the ____ estate", I imagine a vast mansion in the country full of monocled men and high-collared women receiving letters about productions across the country and doing spit-takes at whatever they contain. -Kad
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The Inheritance - Previews#128
Posted: 10/7/19 at 8:24pm

Capeguy said: "A question: Anyone have a theory why all but the 2 older actors are barefoot throughout the play?"

I was wondering the same thing. 

I loved every minute of Part One. Having been on this site for many years, I guess it shouldn’t surprise me how much vitriol is being spewed at something that was almost universally praised in London, but this is always the way on here. I would not listen to the haters. It’s a great night of theatre. 

But yeah. I don’t get the bare feet thing and found it to be very odd. 

 

nasty_khakis
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The Inheritance - Previews#129
Posted: 10/7/19 at 8:29pm

The two actors who wear shoes are Morgan and Henry, the two older characters who are not considered part of "the lads." The play is written as being put on by a group of young men numbered 1-8 telling the story AS it's being written by the actor that becomes Adam/Leo. Morgan and Henry are purposefully outside of that group. I don't think the shoes have some deep meaning or symbolism but I think they're mean to other them in some way.

SouthernCakes
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The Inheritance - Previews#130
Posted: 10/8/19 at 12:09am
I saw this tonight via TDF (Orchestra Row L, House Right. Great view, but prob not a bad seat in the house for this due to the design.)

I’m honestly not sure what to think of this piece. Everyone is hauling it as the next great masterpiece, and I’m not sure it quit lives up to that hype. Angles in America is just so complex and epic, but this feels far simpler. The characters aren’t grand. There’s no fantasy. The characters felt like “ideas” rather than engaging characters: the pretty boy horn dog, the scruffy sensitive one who is into politics, the two “thicker” guys who are the loud funny ones, the cute twink who gets what he wants because he’s a cute twink, etc.

I will day I normally despise narration, but I actually really enjoyed this structure of them writing the show as it goes, but I will say it never allowed me to get fully invested in the relationships of the characters.

The design is sunken, but there’s some really pretty moments, and honestly the direction and performances are the star. It feels like the play that Toby’s character wrote: the performances and the direction are the star of the show.

I honestly feel like the moral of the whole show is just: money solves everything. It seems like all the characters were struggling and then money got involved and now they’re fine. I’m def boiling it down, and there are some beautiful moments, but I wasn’t super taken with it. But will hold off on seeing Part 2. Although Part 1 feels like a complete story, somewhat. (The two brothers burning the note felt very cheesy.)

But the performances are killer.
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The Inheritance - Previews#131
Posted: 10/8/19 at 5:42am
No. Everyone is not hailing it as the next great masterpiece.
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Capeguy
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The Inheritance - Previews#132
Posted: 10/8/19 at 6:58am

RE: SouthernCakes — Part 1 feels like a complete story, somewhat. (The two brothers burning the note felt very cheesy.) 

You may want to read the book "Howards End" or see the film. There's a lot more to come in Part 2. The play doesn't follow the book exactly, but the "burning of the note" is in the book and has a lot to do with the rest of the story.

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Wick3
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The Inheritance - Previews#133
Posted: 10/8/19 at 7:48am

KingGeorgeIII said: "Do you think it's worth reading Howards End before seeing this show? Will my appreciation of the play be enhanced if I read it?"

I’d think so. There’s an article on playbill.com about the playwright Matthew Lopez:

http://www.playbill.com/article/how-howards-end-led-matthew-lopez-to-write-his-unapologetically-gay-magnum-opus-the-inheritance

and in it he states how the movie adaptation and the novel affected him. He read the novel 5-6 times and it influenced/inspired his play The Inheritance. 

Updated On: 10/8/19 at 07:48 AM
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givesmevoice
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The Inheritance - Previews#134
Posted: 10/8/19 at 9:21am

I would also recommend the recent miniseries, which was adapted by Kenneth Lonergan and aired on Starz. It's four one-hour episodes and, because of the luxury of time, was able to hew a little more closely to the novel than the Merchant-Ivory film did. I also think that the film missed some of the humor in the book, although both Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham-Carter are spectacular. (The cast of the miniseries is also excellent. I think it was especially effective to have a slightly younger actor play Henry Wilcox, despite how great Anthony Hopkins was.)

When I see the phrase "the ____ estate", I imagine a vast mansion in the country full of monocled men and high-collared women receiving letters about productions across the country and doing spit-takes at whatever they contain. -Kad
Roscoe
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The Inheritance - Previews#135
Posted: 10/8/19 at 9:25am

Capeguy said: "RE: SouthernCakes—Part 1 feels like a complete story, somewhat. (The two brothers burning the note felt very cheesy.)

You may want to read the book "Howards End" or see the film. There's a lot more to come in Part 2. The playdoesn't follow the book exactly, butthe "burning of the note" is in the book and has a lot to do with the rest of the story.
"

The burning of the note is indeed rather cheesy -- which it most definitely is not in the novel or in the James Ivory film adaptation.  Check out the scene where Anthony Hopkins is holding that note, trying to figure out what the hell to do, basically silently begging somebody to take the damn thing away from him, and the moment where one of his children finally takes him up on it....  Far more interesting than what goes on in the play.

 

"If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers." Thomas Pynchon, GRAVITY'S RAINBOW "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." Philip K. Dick My blog: http://www.roscoewrites.blogspot.com/
Updated On: 10/8/19 at 09:25 AM
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The Inheritance - Previews#136
Posted: 10/8/19 at 12:41pm

Has anyone sat in the rear balcony for this show yet? Or the balcony in general? I am seated in the last row of the rear balcony, however most of the seat in the front rear balcony are still available. Anyone think the ushers would mind if I ask to move forward a few rows? 

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The Inheritance - Previews#137
Posted: 10/8/19 at 1:08pm

There are 2 intermissions, just move down at one of those. The rear orchestra was empty on Monday.

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Miles2Go2
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The Inheritance - Previews#138
Posted: 10/8/19 at 1:20pm
I don’t recall how evenly they divided the weekly performances of Parts 1 & 2 of Angels in America, but I seem to recall it was pretty even. I loved that I could watch Part 1 for my matinee and Part 2 for my evening performance, both on the same Wednesday. I know that’s not for everyone, but it was nirvana to me. One of the most thrilling experiences I’ve ever had in a theatre.

No matter what they do, it’s going to be a hard sell for many. It’s not a two-parter based on a well-established and beloved franchise about a boy wizard that appeals to multi-generations of families. Instead, we’ve got a multi-generational two-parter about the life of gay men that mainly is attractive to gay men, their allies, and those who appreciate “serious” theater. Your typical family of four from Nebraska will not be attending. I have no desire to see the former, but I will be very disappointed if I can’t see the latter.
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The Inheritance - Previews#139
Posted: 10/8/19 at 1:29pm

Roscoe: ...The burning of the note is indeed rather cheesy -- which it most definitely is not in the novel...

It's been many years since I have seen the film but I did read the book last month. The note was not burned exactly as in the play since that would require a fireplace but it WAS most definitely burned. See below:

Excerpt From: Edward Morgan Forster. “Howards End.”— Chapter 11:

...“The problem is too terrific, and they could not even perceive a problem. No; it is natural and fitting that after due debate they should tear the note up and throw it on to their dining-room fire. The practical moralist may acquit them absolutely. He who strives to look deeper may acquit them—almost. For one hard fact remains. They did neglect a personal appeal. The woman who had died did say to them, “Do this,” and they answered, “We will not.”

Roscoe
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The Inheritance - Previews#140
Posted: 10/9/19 at 8:43am

Capeguy said: "It's been many years since I have seen the film but I did read the book last month. The note was not burned exactly as in the play since that would require a fireplace but it WAS most definitelyburned.

I can see that I wasn't being clear -- I meant to refer to the perceived cheesiness of the letter being burned rather than the actual burning of the letter as not being part of the novel or the film.  Of course the letter, or more accurately note, is burned in the novel and in the film, far more interestingly than in THE INHERITANCE to my mind at least.

 

"If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about the answers." Thomas Pynchon, GRAVITY'S RAINBOW "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." Philip K. Dick My blog: http://www.roscoewrites.blogspot.com/
Updated On: 10/9/19 at 08:43 AM
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The Inheritance - Previews#141
Posted: 10/9/19 at 8:14pm

Roscoe said: "Capeguy said: "It's been many years since I have seen the film but I did read the book last month. The note was not burned exactly as in the play since that would require a fireplace but it WAS most definitelyburned.

I can see that I wasn't being clear -- I meant to referto the perceivedcheesiness of the letter being burned rather than the actual burning of the letter as not being part of the novel or the film. Of course the letter, or more accurately note, is burned in the novel and in the film, far more interestingly than in THE INHERITANCE to my mind at least.


"

Different strokes. I thought it was a great theatrical moment and I got chills. It’s also basically the play’s logo - a cherry blossom burning, symbolizing the burning of the letter.

Updated On: 10/10/19 at 08:14 PM
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bwayphreak234
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The Inheritance - Previews#142
Posted: 10/10/19 at 7:52am

I saw part 1 of The Inheritance on Monday night, and I was completely blown away with the play. It's timely, epic, touching, beautiful, and shattering. All of the actors delivered stellar performances across the board. I am beyond excited to see part 2.

"There’s nothing quite like the power and the passion of Broadway music. "
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Auggie27
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The Inheritance - Previews#143
Posted: 10/10/19 at 8:34pm

Having not seen the production, and not fully sold on investing in 7 hours, I ordered read the entire script, all 318 pages. Reading comments and some of the London reviews, I sense that my reaction is heresy. But I found Part Two infinitely more emotionally engaging, even if its denouement is attenuated. (Lopez seems to feel every sociopolitical annotation requires repeating; sometimes it feels as if he doesn't trust an audience to grasp a point the first or second time. The chorus/narrative underscores everything a bit too aggressively in places for my taste; subjective, admittedly.) The second half focuses more on Henry Wilcox, a fascinating character who's intricately tied to the thematic elements carried by the title. Maybe the banter-y start of the play, as much "Jeffrey" as "Angels," just feels slight or a tad familiar. These name, locale, and product-dropping Manhattanites are in every LGBTQ script since "Boys..." and as they quip and quip some more, we wait for something fresher. Once the piece reaches the much-discussed first half crescendo (NO SPOILERS), it begins to deepen. In the second half, the stakes are upped for everyone. And the only female character, also much talked about, on the page feels overwritten even if her story is touching and absolutely integral.

All of that aside, it's quite an impressive piece of work, by the end in no way disappointing; my comments are subjective quibbles.

I may do what few have done: see only Part II. I suspect no one else has anything close to this response -- starting appropriately with the first half is logical -- but if you've read the full text, certainly a single half is an option. I also can imagine Lois Smith almost running away with the play. I'm also intrigued to see what the wonderful, under-sung John Benjamin Hickey does with Wilcox.

"I'm a comedian, but in my spare time, things bother me." Garry Shandling
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The Inheritance - Previews#144
Posted: 10/11/19 at 3:19pm
This is a fabulous double-bill that absolutely requires both parts (unless you're the type who loves leaving after Act 1 of something?) Yes, it's an investment of time (AND money) but it's worth it! See Howard's End prior, or not. Read the script prior, if you want? Just make sure you give yourself the opportunity to be a part of this masterpiece.
nasty_khakis
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The Inheritance - Previews#145
Posted: 10/11/19 at 3:49pm

Even though I personally prefer Part 2 and it does bare urging people to see it, I still think most casual theater goers (who aren't the type to be on theatre message boards) will be perfectly fine just seeing Part 1. I guarantee in a year or two we'll be asking people about this play and they'll rave and say they loved it but then they'll say they only saw Part 1. It's why they're doing more Part 1 in the schedule.

nasty_khakis
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The Inheritance - Previews#146
Posted: 10/12/19 at 11:09am

I saw the first preview of Part 2 last night and while I was still very moved and find it to be beautiful, there were some I think major changes from London that I didn't like.

The non-spoilery changes are they basically took out the second intermission with only a brief 5 minute pause between acts 2 and 3. The actors also all appeared to be plowing through and never stopping during the laughs causing many lines to be missed. The only times they seemed to were during Tristan's speech to Henry and during Lois Smith's scene she played the audience like a fiddle. She was a bit shaky and paused a lot, but she was wonderful. I never cared for Redgrave in London who seemed to be fed every single line via an earpiece and a distracting bad southern accent so it was refreshing to listen to the words coming out of Smith's no nonsense mouth. She had the entire audience laughing and based on what I could hear, sobbing all throughout her scene. She will only get more comfortable and sure of her lines.

I'll put more plot-spoily changes below--

 
Click Here To Toggle Spoiler Content

The major changes are they've changed how Leo comes back into Toby's life. He no longer just shows up at Toby's apartment, but Leo literally runs into Toby, who mistakes him for Adam as he's running out of the Strand, shoplifting books. Then Leo shows up to his apartment to shower and wash his clothes same as before, but this time Toby knows who he is immediately and they do not have sex. They just become friends who see movies and plays. They don't have sex again until they get to Fire Island and there's a new section describing their sex and how it's the first time Leo's had sex with someone else thinking about HIS pleasure and how great it is. They also change a lot of the dialogue around Leo and Toby's fight in the Pines about what they mean to each other and where Toby admits more about his past. I think the purpose of this is to soften Toby a bit and not make Leo just a sex object to him. I'm still running it through my brain and can't decide if I don't like it as much or if I was just thrown by the change. They also have Leo find out how much he looks like Adam much earlier and not just startled by it at the opening of "Loved Boy." Lopez also rewrote most of the opening night of the play having Toby arrive late and leave early causing a scene. They also cut Eric's voicemails trying to connect with Toby and invite him to the wedding and have him invite Toby during the scene where they meet and tells him he's getting married.

They also cut Toby immediately saying "Adam?!" the second he sees Leo at Walter's house at the end. He says something like "Leo? I never thought I'd see you again" with Leo immediately hugging him for dear life before punching him, walking off to get the water glass to smash on his head. I do. not. like. this. change. To me, that moment of mistaking him for Adam was so emotionally powerful because he somehow just hurt Leo even more than he ever had in that one moment. I felt Sam Levine's soul and heart escape his body in that moment and his rage and pain and sadness were all just so justified that now I just didn't feel. They seem to be trying to soften Toby's edges but at the sake of Leo, who I also found to be the emotional core of Part 2. 

I'll definitely see it again, but I don't see why they've made these changes. Maybe I'll enjoy them and understand them more now that I won't be so distracted by them, but for now I'm hoping things get changed back. 

nasty_khakis
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The Inheritance - Previews#147
Posted: 10/12/19 at 11:09am

I saw the first preview of Part 2 last night and while I was still very moved and find it to be beautiful, there were some I think major changes from London that I didn't like.

The non-spoilery changes are they basically took out the second intermission with only a brief 5 minute pause between acts 2 and 3. The actors also all appeared to be plowing through and never stopping during the laughs causing many lines to be missed. The only times they seemed to were during Tristan's speech to Henry and during Lois Smith's scene she played the audience like a fiddle. She was a bit shaky and paused a lot, but she was wonderful. I never cared for Redgrave in London who seemed to be fed every single line via an earpiece and a distracting bad southern accent so it was refreshing to listen to the words coming out of Smith's no nonsense mouth. She had the entire audience laughing and based on what I could hear, sobbing all throughout her scene. She will only get more comfortable and sure of her lines.

I'll put more plot-spoily changes below--

 
Click Here To Toggle Spoiler Content

The major changes are they've changed how Leo comes back into Toby's life. He no longer just shows up at Toby's apartment, but Leo literally runs into Toby, who mistakes him for Adam as he's running out of the Strand, shoplifting books. Then Leo shows up to his apartment to shower and wash his clothes same as before, but this time Toby knows who he is immediately and they do not have sex. They just become friends who see movies and plays. They don't have sex again until they get to Fire Island and there's a new section describing their sex and how it's the first time Leo's had sex with someone else thinking about HIS pleasure and how great it is. They also change a lot of the dialogue around Leo and Toby's fight in the Pines about what they mean to each other and where Toby admits more about his past. I think the purpose of this is to soften Toby a bit and not make Leo just a sex object to him. I'm still running it through my brain and can't decide if I don't like it as much or if I was just thrown by the change. They also have Leo find out how much he looks like Adam much earlier and not just startled by it at the opening of "Loved Boy." Lopez also rewrote most of the opening night of the play having Toby arrive late and leave early causing a scene. They also cut Eric's voicemails trying to connect with Toby and invite him to the wedding and have him invite Toby during the scene where they meet and tells him he's getting married.

They also cut Toby immediately saying "Adam?!" the second he sees Leo at Walter's house at the end. He says something like "Leo? I never thought I'd see you again" with Leo immediately hugging him for dear life before punching him, walking off to get the water glass to smash on his head. I do. not. like. this. change. To me, that moment of mistaking him for Adam was so emotionally powerful because he somehow just hurt Leo even more than he ever had in that one moment. I felt Sam Levine's soul and heart escape his body in that moment and his rage and pain and sadness were all just so justified that now I just didn't feel. They seem to be trying to soften Toby's edges but at the sake of Leo, who I also found to be the emotional core of Part 2. 

I'll definitely see it again, but I don't see why they've made these changes. Maybe I'll enjoy them and understand them more now that I won't be so distracted by them, but for now I'm hoping things get changed back. 

JBC3
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The Inheritance - Previews#148
Posted: 10/12/19 at 12:31pm
$75 center orchestra aisle ticket for tonight over in the For Sale board.
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The Inheritance - Previews#149
Posted: 10/12/19 at 1:56pm

cjmclaughlin10 said: "I want one of those Tote Bags!!!! If anyone is selling one, please PM me"

I have a tote for Part 1 and one for Part 2.  Check your PMs.

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The Inheritance - Previews#150
Posted: 10/12/19 at 2:19pm
The trailer alone gives me chills. I’ve got to make it back to see this.

Are there pics of the tote bags online?