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NY Philharmonic MAHLER'S NEW YORK: A DIGITAL FESTIVAL Begins April 16

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NY Philharmonic MAHLER'S NEW YORK: A DIGITAL FESTIVAL Begins April 16

The New York Philharmonic will present Mahler's New York: A Digital Festival - a two-week celebration of the composer / conductor who spent time in New York as the Philharmonic's tenth Music Director (1909-11) - April 16-30, 2020, at nyphil.org/mahlerny.

The festival will feature seven video broadcasts, audio of the complete symphonies, an archival exhibit, a virtual walking tour, the all-day Mahler Grooves celebration, recipes, and education materials. Philharmonic musicians will appear in video introductions to each of the ten symphonies and in performances from their homes. To approximate the experience of a live, in-person festival, content will be released over the course of the two weeks; a complete schedule is available here. Festival partners include Google Arts & Culture; Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; Neue Galerie New York, Café Sabarsky; and WQXR.

The digital festival brings online the festival of the same name that had been scheduled to take place this month at David Geffen Hall before the 2020 European tour, where the Orchestra would have opened the Concertgebouw's Mahler Festival as the first American orchestra in the festival's 100-year history. All of these performances were cancelled in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

VIDEO BROADCASTS ON FACEBOOK AND YOUTUBE

The Philharmonic will present seven Mahler-related video broadcasts during the festival, all available through nyphil.org/mahlerny:

  • Thursday, April 16, 7:30 p.m. EDT (on-demand afterward)
    On the opening night of the festival, the Philharmonic and Lincoln Center at Home will co-present a rebroadcast of the 2005 Live From Lincoln Center episode featuring Mahler's Symphony No. 1, conducted by then Music Director Lorin Maazel.
  • Saturday, April 18, 2:00 p.m. EDT (available for 24 hours)
    The Philharmonic, Unitel, CBS, and The Leonard Bernstein Office will co-present a rebroadcast of Who Is Gustav Mahler?, a Young People's Concert hosted by then Music Director Leonard Bernstein and featuring Reri Grist, televised in February 1960. Bernstein was a noted Mahler champion, and the episode spotlighted Mahler when he was not yet a household name.
  • Monday, April 20, 7:30 p.m. EDT (on-demand afterward)
    The Philharmonic will rebroadcast a 2011 performance of Mahler's Kindertotenlieder, conducted by then Music Director Alan Gilbert and featuring baritone Thomas Hampson. The performance at the Leipzig Gewandhaus marked the 100th anniversary of Mahler's death and final Philharmonic season, and the 150th anniversary of his birth.
  • Thursday, April 23, 7:30 p.m. EDT (on-demand afterward)
    The all-day Mahler Grooves celebration will culminate in a concert broadcast featuring Philharmonic musicians performing from home, including his Piano Quartet performed by Philharmonic violinist Quan Ge, Assistant Principal Viola Cong Wu, cellist Nathan Vickery, and pianist Eric Huebner. It will mark the Philharmonic's first scheduled broadcast of performances filmed during this period of isolation.
  • Saturday, April 25, 2:00 p.m. EDT (available for 24 hours)
    The Philharmonic, Unitel, CBS, and The Leonard Bernstein Office will co-present a rebroadcast of A Toast to Vienna in 3/4 Time, a Young People's Concert hosted by then Music Director Leonard Bernstein and featuring Christa Ludwig and Walter Berry, televised in December 1967. The episode paid tribute to the Philharmonic's "fraternal orchestra," the Vienna Philharmonic, founded the same year.
  • Monday, April 27, 7:30 p.m. EDT (on-demand afterward)
    The Philharmonic will rebroadcast A Concert for Unity (2017), featuring Mahler's Symphony No. 7 led by Alan Gilbert and performed by the Philharmonic joined by musicians from orchestras around the world, celebrating the power of music to build bridges and unite people across borders. The musicians included members of orchestras from Australia, Brazil, China, Cuba, France, Germany, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Turkey, Venezuela, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • Thursday, April 30, 7:30 p.m. EDT (available for 24 hours)
    The festival will conclude with the first-ever rebroadcast of the historic 1963 telecast of Mahler's Symphony No. 2, Resurrection, led by then Music Director Leonard Bernstein in tribute to JFK, two days after the assassination. It marked the first televised performance of the Resurrection symphony and began a long tradition of performing music by Mahler during times of national mourning. Bernstein led the Philharmonic in the Adagietto from Mahler's Symphony No. 5 at Robert Kennedy's funeral in 1968, and Pierre Boulez (who later became Music Director) conducted the same movement in recognition of President Eisenhower's death in 1969. In 2011 former Music Director Alan Gilbert led Mahler's Resurrection Symphony in A Concert for New York to mark the tenth anniversary of 9/11; medici.tv will make this concert available free for 48 hours, April 28-30.

These broadcasts will follow five previous broadcasts during this period of isolation, simulating the experience of a live concert to foster a sense of community among classical music fans worldwide.

Over the course of the festival, audio of Philharmonic performances of Mahler's ten symphonies and other orchestral works will be released on a near-daily basis. Each episode of Mahler: The Complete Symphonies - a ten-part cycle that originally aired in 2017 on The New York Philharmonic This Week, hosted by Alec Baldwin - will be supplemented by newly recorded video introductions by Philharmonic musicians, as well as relevant materials from the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives.

On the last night of the festival, April 30 at 9:00 p.m. EDT, WQXR 105.9 FM, New York's only all-classical music station, will air audio of Jaap van Zweden leading Mahler's Symphony No. 1 in his 2012 Philharmonic debut. The broadcast will include interviews with Maestro van Zweden and Philharmonic musicians; it will be available for on-demand streaming afterward.

The New York Philharmonic has partnered with Google Arts & Culture to present an archival exhibit and virtual walking tour of Mahler's New York, both created by the New York Philharmonic Archives. The online exhibit and virtual walking tour will be available at artsandculture.google.com/partner/new-york-philharmonic.

The online exhibit tells the story of Mahler's New York: his arrival in 1909; his Philharmonic tenure (1909-11), including the repertoire he performed and his relationship with management, musicians, and critics; and the city's influence on his music. Visual highlights include the newly restored score of Mahler's Symphony No. 1 marked by the composer and used in the 1909 US Premiere by the Philharmonic, and correspondence, scores, programs, and press clippings from his tenure. Other highlights include historic audio of Philharmonic musicians' recollections of Mahler's tenure and audio narrating letters written by his wife, Alma. Google Arts & Culture will launch the exhibit on April 15, World Art Day.

The virtual walking tour, to be released April 22, will use Google's Street View feature to show what Mahler's New York looked like then and now, accompanied by audio explanations narrated by Philharmonic musicians. Highlights include venues where Mahler performed, his subway stops, the beer hall where he toasted Philharmonic musicians, the arcade where he attended a séance, the opium den he was invited to, and the apartment from which he witnessed a procession for a deceased fireman, the drum beats from which he later incorporated in his Symphony No. 10.

On April 23 the Philharmonic will present Mahler Grooves, a day-long Mahler celebration featuring social media broadcasts inviting at-home participation, culminating in a Facebook and YouTube broadcast and Instagram Live DJ set.

Leading up to the Mahler Grooves concert broadcast, the Philharmonic will create a crowd-sourced playlist titled What Makes You Groove? to use as a musical backdrop for the day's activities. The activities include Mahler Eats and Mahler Drinks - both featuring food and cocktails on Instagram (recipes available on nyphil.org/mahlerny) - and Mahler Draws, centering on the many caricatures of Mahler from throughout his career.

Mahler Grooves will culminate in a Facebook and YouTube broadcast featuring Philharmonic musicians performing works by Mahler from home, including his Piano Quartet performed by Philharmonic violinist Quan Ge, Assistant Principal Viola Cong Wu, cellist Nathan Vickery, and pianist Eric Huebner. The Philharmonic will then host Mahler Spins, an Instagram Live post-concert DJ set with Assistant Principal Timpani / percussionist Kyle Zerna (@dr._sweers).

More details about the all-day Mahler Grooves celebration will be announced at a later date.

Mahler Grooves is inspired by a bumper sticker emblazoned with the words MAHLER GROOVES, created by the Mahler Society of Los Angeles, found on the opening pages of Leonard Bernstein's score of Mahler's Symphony No. 6. That score is housed in the New York Philharmonic Archives and can be viewed in the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives here.

The Philharmonic will post Viennese recipes on nyphil.org/mahlerny and encourage followers to safely procure the ingredients and taste food and drink that Mahler would have enjoyed. Neue Galerie New York's Café Sabarsky will provide recipes from its cookbook, Neue Cuisine: The Elegant Tastes of Vienna. Authored by Kurt Gutenbrunner with Jane Sigal and published by Rizzoli in 2011, Neue Cuisine includes more than 100 accessible recipes of the Viennese tradition. The Philharmonic will also share Mahler's sister's recipe for the composer's beloved Marillenknoedel (apricot dumplings). The recipes will be featured on social media during the day-long Mahler Grooves celebration.

The Philharmonic's Education department will release activities related to Mahler - supplemented by audio of the Philharmonic performing works by Mahler - for kids and their families to do from home. The materials will be available through nyphil.org/mahlerny and offered to the tens of thousands of New York City public school students to support their at-home learning.



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