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what do you guys think of this?

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luvtheEmcee
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what do you guys think of this?#0
Posted: 3/17/04 at 5:00pm
alright, this is sort of theater-related, so I figured I'd throw it out at you all. For those who are familiar with Othello:

Today in my English class, in honor of St. Patrick's day, we wrote Limericks based on Othello, since we just finished reading it last week (which, by the way, I think is an utterly absurd assigment for a so-called "college level" AP course). Just my luck, I was placed in a limerick-writing group with some horrendously immature male classmates. They chose to include zero depth about the play in the poems, and to focus on Iago's mention of the time he had shared a bed with Cassio. (My class briefly discussed if there were in fact homosexual undertones to this, but my teacher brushed it off quickly.) They were terribly fixated upon it, and even worse, they apparently found it hysterical. I found it strange - see, if Iago was scheming to get revenge on Othello and Cassio, but Cassio was in fact homosexual, that would make Iago's entire plan invalid. After all, Iago is trying to upset Othello by making him think that Cassio is sleeping with his wife. I contemplated arguing, but it wasn't quite worth it, so I swallowed my pride and let them have their fun. It seems to me that - with all the speculation about Shakespeare himself - they assume that any of his works *must* contain some homosexuality. They then chose to say that Iago "wants Othello," after which I pointed out the line in which Iago tells the audience that he secretly has feelings for Desdemona. They decided that what the play said was of no importance, and simply there for them to change it. This became less of an issue of just simply their interpretation of the play, and I was so angered by their flippant attitudes.... I guess it continues to go back to my disgust at their amusement with such topics in general, not just in the instance of Othello. I suppose perhaps it is again the perpetual immaturity of high school students that I am often ashamed to be associated with. I figured I'd post.... maybe someone on here has some settling thoughts for me. Thanks for caring and reading my ranting post.
A work of art is an invitation to love.
Updated On: 3/17/04 at 05:00 PM
LadyGuenevere
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re: what do you guys think of this?#1
Posted: 3/17/04 at 8:08pm
I hate that too.

The guys in my English Lit. class loved the Canterbury Tales only when they found out that two of the characters were homosexual (the Summoner and...I can't remember the other one). That was the only fact that they could remember when they took the test, as well. Pissed my teacher off a lot.
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re: re: what do you guys think of this?#2
Posted: 3/17/04 at 8:12pm
They found traces of homosexuality in Catcher in the Rye and The Great Gatsby in my class. And they have to friggen' harp on it. Those two instances were not important factors in the book. It was so obnoxious.

I can't wait for college. I hope it doesn't disappoint me!
LadyGuenevere
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Rofl! Who was gay, Holden?

Some kid said that he was because he tap dances in the can. That actually made me laugh. re: re: re: what do you guys think of this?
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"Rofl! Who was gay, Holden?

Some kid said that he was because he tap dances in the can. That actually made me laugh."

Classic child's view of homosexuality.
LadyGuenevere
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I agree. That was such a ridiculous statement, it was great. (okay, that didn't make sense!)

I also know people that base their ideas on sexual preference based on voice. If a guy has a feminine voice, they're gay. If a girl is butch, she's a lesbian. I hate that since they say that my voice is kind of butch. But I just go along with it (and let them think that! wonderful, huh?)- not that a bunch of high schoolers opinions really are gonna matter to me.
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And don't forget-guys cannot be around anything that is pink, purple, or rainbow!

Yep.
LadyGuenevere
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I adore men in pink shirts.

(oh, and I wear rainbow accessories, which confuses everyone. fun. I guess the fact that I like guys, and they know it doesn't matter! the rainbow does you in! re: re: re: re: re: re: re: what do you guys think of this? )
Updated On: 3/17/04 at 08:25 PM
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MyNameInLights
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This is insane! And I used to think someone in the world was mature (besides ourselves of course!). We're reading Romeo and Juliet in my English class, and I am getting so frustrated. There's people falling asleep, bitching at the way it's written, and just being so stupid about it. It's soooo stupid.

Food for thought: If you're a man who likes musical theatre, you're gay.
"The stage is where I live and come alive and act out all the things that go on in my life. It's not just what I do for a living, it's my shrink and my love affair. No one in my life has ever or ever will kiss me on the mouth like this lover called my relationship with my performance."
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In Catcher in the Rye they thought that the teacher was gay who was touching Holden's head while he slept.

Having enjoyment of musical theatre, being heterosexual, and being in high school is so hard. Ugh.

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"Food for thought: If you're a man who likes musical theatre, you're gay."

I think that's a common stereotype, (evend though it is for the most part true) and that is hard to get rid of. Stereotypes are awful... but I guess we have to deal. I was reading a book, though, on the connection between gay culture and musical theatre... pretty interesting actually.

"In Catcher in the Rye they thought that the teacher was gay who was touching Holden's head while he slept."

I think that's the only instance where it's a possibility that Salinger was hinting at homosexuality. The others I heard while reading Catcher were completely illegitimate.

A work of art is an invitation to love.
Updated On: 3/19/04 at 09:25 PM
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MyNameInLights
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I hate homophobia and gay stereotypes.
"The stage is where I live and come alive and act out all the things that go on in my life. It's not just what I do for a living, it's my shrink and my love affair. No one in my life has ever or ever will kiss me on the mouth like this lover called my relationship with my performance."
Updated On: 3/17/04 at 10:15 PM
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"We're reading Romeo and Juliet in my English class, and I am getting so frustrated. There's people falling asleep, bitching at the way it's written, and just being so stupid about it."


Look at it this way, Skakespeare is very difficult fo many people to understand. Intitially, it requires reading verses over and over and trying to extract the meaning until you get used to the language. Most school kids don't have the attention span necessary to do this. I think there are also some kids who may be afraid that they will stupid for not getting as well as those who are embarassed to say they undrstand or like it because it makes them appear weird, nerdy or effeminant in the eyes of their peers.

If you're making the effort to understand and try to apprecaite it, good for you. It shows you're at a higher maturity level than some of your classmates. You will end up reading some wonderful stories about love, intrigue, espionage, the occult, incest, adultery...it's all in Shakespeare.

Tell your bored class mates they may enjoy the Simpsons version of Hamlet or the Gilligan's Island musical Hamlet episode. For Romeo and Juliette, there is the Leonardo DiCaprio movie. They might also be surprised at how many popular movies over recent years have been based on Shakespeare's stories. They may have watched Hamlet and MacBeth a number of times without knowing it.
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EmCee...I've worked in Musical theatre for almost 20 years now and I can tell you - most men involved (onstage) in musicals are indeed Gay - a very large percentage, anyway. Not that it matters at all - but it makes it hard for the occasional truly straight guy in the show (to prove he's NOT gay, at least)...
I wanted to believe otherwise for many years - but the fact is that most of the professional (and non) shows I've been contained a majority of homosexual men (and a few gay women).
This is not a judgement of any kind - simply a fact. Unfortunately a lot of younger guys who are not comfortable with their own sexuality will become musical performers and take years (literally) to come out of the closet - if at all.
I think in this day and age, no one cares anymore what a person's sexuality is - at least not in the larger Metropolitan areas of the country...I've never been made fun of or attacked or even called names in all the years I've lived in NYC and I'm about as OUT as it gets. But back in the midwest - forget about it!
"I don't really get the ending,all i can go with is when after several months,Judith saw Pat sang,and later she kissed him on the toilet,after that the story back to where Pat went down from the stage after he'd sung,and he went to the italian lady.I just don't get it,what Judith exatcly meant when he kissed Pat that she had seen,and did Pat end up together with The Italian Lady?Please help me,thank u very much!" Quote from someone on IMDB in reference to a movie he/she didn't understand. Such grammar!
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Yep...all of the guys in the back corner of the classroom had to harp on homosexuality in Catcher in the Rye. It was holden and that guy (haha...I forget so quickly).
CCM '10!
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luvtheEmcee
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and the torture continues.... *shakes head in shame*
we had to finish those awful Limericks today, and I was embarassed to see such useless crap in my own handwriting.

redhotinnyc - i wasn't really saying I was concerned with the sexuality of people involved in theater. Trust me, I honestly believe it should not matter. I was saying how much it bothered me that these classmates of mine were reacting so horribly to the play, and turning everything on its head so that they'd find it amusing.

Anyway... unfortunately we have to actually act out Othello in the same groups. Obviously I take theater seriously when it should be taken seriously (as I think is the case with Shakespeare) - but no, we must amuse the class. They wanted to cast it so that they could be a certain two characters that would talk to each other, therefore talking to themselves... I'm hardly ever a bitch to anyone, but I was so completely frustrated with how lightly they took something so artistic....

*sigh*
only 3 months until I graduate, thank goodness!
A work of art is an invitation to love.
Updated On: 3/18/04 at 09:07 PM
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etoile
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Limericks have never been considered a high form of literature. More like the lowest form of poetry. Just think of it as an example of the "groundlings" having their say. How they interpreted OTHELLO. This is what the play said to them. Not everyone has the same take on any play or any playwright. Especially Shakespeare. Possibly this was more of a social experiment than a literary one.
Rest in peace, Iflitifloat.
Updated On: 3/19/04 at 01:03 AM