Wesley Doucette

Wesley Doucette


MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents LA REPRISE by MILO RAUBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents LA REPRISE by MILO RAU
Posted: Jul. 10, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents MEDUSE By LES B?TARDS DORESBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents MEDUSE By LES B?TARDS DORES
Posted: Jul. 25, 2018


BWW Review: BIG DEAL, BOB FOSSE AND DANCE IN THE AMERICAN MUSICAL By KEVIN WINKLERBWW Review: BIG DEAL, BOB FOSSE AND DANCE IN THE AMERICAN MUSICAL By KEVIN WINKLER
Posted: Aug. 3, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ROMANCES INCIERTOS, UN AUTRE ORLANDO By FRAN?OIS CHAIGNAUD And NINO LAISNEBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ROMANCES INCIERTOS, UN AUTRE ORLANDO By FRAN?OIS CHAIGNAUD And NINO LAISNE
Posted: Jul. 13, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents STORY WATER By EMANUEL GATBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents STORY WATER By EMANUEL GAT
Posted: Jul. 22, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CANZONE PER ORNELLA By RAIMUND HOGHEBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CANZONE PER ORNELLA By RAIMUND HOGHE
Posted: Jul. 24, 2018


BWW Review: BIG DEAL, BOB FOSSE AND DANCE IN THE AMERICAN MUSICAL By KEVIN WINKLERBWW Review: BIG DEAL, BOB FOSSE AND DANCE IN THE AMERICAN MUSICAL By KEVIN WINKLER
August 3, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CERTAINES N'AVAIENT JAMAIS VU LA MER By RICHARD BRUNELBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CERTAINES N'AVAIENT JAMAIS VU LA MER By RICHARD BRUNEL
July 27, 2018

Based on Julie Otsuka's novel The Buddha in the Attic, Certaines n'Avaient Jamais Vu La Mer, in performance in the Avignon Theatre Festival's Cloitre des Carmes, is a look at the lives of Japanese immigrants in America from the turn of the 20th century to FDR's internment camps. Director Richard Brunel's multimedia and elemental staging is supremely inventive, and the performances spark with vitality. Those familiar with the history might find themselves treading familiar territory. However, Certaines n'Avaient Jamais Vu La Mer can serve for some as a theatrically dynamic introduction to one of America's great historic shames.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents MEDUSE By LES BÂTARDS DORES
July 25, 2018

As my time attending performances in the Avignon Festival's 'In' comes to a close there are certain consistencies that float to the surface. Among these are nudity, bodily fluids, video integration, and a spectacular quality of sound design. Les Batard Dore's Meduse, now in performance in the Avignon Theatre Festival's Gymanse du Lycee St Joseph, has a bit, or a lot, of each. However, even in as such lofty company as the Avignon Theatre Festival, Leny Bernay's soundscape is transporting. Translating mental anguish, the sea, and dizzying poetry in a heart rumbling bass his presence is a boon to Les Batards Dores extremely promising production.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CANZONE PER ORNELLA By RAIMUND HOGHEBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CANZONE PER ORNELLA By RAIMUND HOGHE
July 24, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents STORY WATER By EMANUEL GATBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents STORY WATER By EMANUEL GAT
July 22, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ARCTIQUE By ANNE-CECILE VANDALEMBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ARCTIQUE By ANNE-CECILE VANDALEM
July 23, 2018

Anne-Cecile Vandalem's Arctique, now in production at the Avignon Theatre Festival's La FabricA, is a spectacular and rare diversion in a program laden with portentous prophesying. Equal parts Black Mirror and Murder on the Orient Express, Arctique is set after the fall of global warming in 2025. Though, never mind that, the downfall of world order is simply a social backdrop. Doubt not however that Vandalem has made a deep social mythology to rival the best of the speculative fiction genre. It's just that, dramatically speaking, she simply has more pressing matters to deal with.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents DE DINGEN DIE VOORBIJGAAN By IVO VAN HOVEBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents DE DINGEN DIE VOORBIJGAAN By IVO VAN HOVE
July 23, 2018

Has anyone embodied the industrial elegance of central European theatre more fully than Ivo Van Hove? His worlds are factory made with squares of glass, metal, and stone. His characters reside within an inescapable atmosphere of manufactured order. Whenever disorder breaks the mold, whether it be by cascading water and blood in his View From The Bridge, or by reams of black snow in De Dingen Die Voorbijgaan, now in performance at the Avignon Theatre Festival's Lycee Saint Joseph, its breach comes as a violent shock. Gazing at the looming black metal and industrial lighting yawning over Jan Versweyveld's slate tiled scenography, it's hard to imagine that this world could contain full people. However, such is the case in De Dingen Die Voorbijgaan which, within this environment devoid of softness creates a drama of the deepest intimacy and the most raw humanity. In Van Hove's glittering diadem of masterpieces, it is a particularly glowing jewel.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents TARTIUFAS Directed By OSKARAS KORSUNOVASBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents TARTIUFAS Directed By OSKARAS KORSUNOVAS
July 23, 2018

An actor once vented to me after a performance that the cast 'had something good, but the director screwed it up by trying to make it something important.' The word 'screwed' is my addition. So too is the fatal flaw of Oskaras Korsunovas's Tartiufas, now in performance in the Avignon Theatre Festival's Opera Confluence. The world is glowing in a post-baroque kitsch. The actors are superbly game, throwing themselves into daring feats of theatrical acrobatics. Yet, politically overcompensating, Tartiufas repeatedly doesn't stick the landing.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents 36, AVENUE GEORGES MANDEL By RAIMUND HOGHEBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents 36, AVENUE GEORGES MANDEL By RAIMUND HOGHE
July 19, 2018

To enter or exit The Avignon Theatre Festival's stunning Clotre des Carmes one must cross in full view of bleacher seating on the space's Marley floor, which extends uninterrupted from the upstage gothic corridor. Despite such a conspicuous route, or perhaps because of it, many attending Raimund Hoghe's 36, Avenue Georges Mandel took a speedy or defiant mid-performance exit. The performance I attended this past Tuesday ended in a sturdy division between aggressive boos and a smattering of impassioned standing ovations. I am not sure if either extreme reaction was truly merited. I am even more uncertain as to why this piece, first performed in the Festival in 2007, was picked for a rare Avignon Theatre Festival revival.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents RACINE'S IPHEGENIE Directed By CHLOE DABERTBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents RACINE'S IPHEGENIE Directed By CHLOE DABERT
July 16, 2018

Sometimes it takes one great performance to rescue an evening of theatre. Servane Ducorps, as the enraged and heartbroken Clytemnestra, does her level best in Racine's Iphigenie, now in The Avignon Theatre Festival's Cloitre des Carmes. While it isn't quite enough to get the work over the finish line, her performance is a beacon in an otherwise self-pitying slog.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents THYESTE Directed By THOMAS JOLLYBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents THYESTE Directed By THOMAS JOLLY
July 16, 2018

In theatre there are few spaces as uniquely prestigious or complicated as The Avignon Theatre Festival's La Cour d'Honneur. Situated in the 14th century Palais des Papes, the immense open-air stage is backed by an imposing 100-foot stone wall. The wall comes unhelpfully pre-furnished with scenic elements such as a large gothic balcony and haphazardly placed windows. The work of any director must ultimately answer to such an imposing space. Amazingly, Thomas Jolly's modern staging of the Roman classic Thyeste finds a sonorous harmony within this medieval chasm.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents JOUEURS, MAO II, ET LES NOMS By JULIEN GOSSELINBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents JOUEURS, MAO II, ET LES NOMS By JULIEN GOSSELIN
July 17, 2018

Reassuring variations of 'I heard it was good,' and as common threats of 'It better be,' pepper the courtyard of The Avignon Theatre Festival's mercifully comfortable La FabricA theatre. Concern is well placed as Gosselin's epic three part trilogy, Joueurs, Mao II, et Les Noms spans a daring ten hours without intermission. This marathon, which seamlessly synthesizes literature, film, and live drama, transforms La FabricA into its own artistic ecosystem. It's hard to imagine that some residue of the artistic toil will not indelibly mark the space. What results from these ten hours is part elegy to the state of violence, part theatrical deconstruction, and part Netflix binge.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ROMANCES INCIERTOS, UN AUTRE ORLANDO By FRANÇOIS CHAIGNAUD And NINO LAISNE
July 13, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents GRITO PELAO by COMPAGNIE ROCÍO MOLINA
July 12, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents KREATUR by SASHA WALTZBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents KREATUR by SASHA WALTZ
July 10, 2018

The figures that appear in Sasha Waltz's Kreatur, now in performance at Opera Confluence at the Avignon Theatre Festival, defy belief. The incomparable costume design by Iris van Herpen transforms the human body with spikes, light as air cocoons, and patterns that appear and disappear from view depending on the angle. Soundwalk Collective's soundscape fascinates as it distorts electronic rhythm, industrial machinery, the sounds of nature, and, in one fabulous instance, The Nutcracker's 'Arabian Dance.' With so many elements of the performance attempting to drag the spectator to an alternate dimension, it is a shame that the world on stage remains one of concert dance convention.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents LA REPRISE by MILO RAUBWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents LA REPRISE by MILO RAU
July 10, 2018

'Milo Rau has created nothing short of a shocking success. I pray the day comes when such artistic experiences are not necessary. Though in our world of catastrophe, he offers something visceral and vital.'

BWW REVIEW: American Ballet Theatre's LE CORSAIREBWW REVIEW: American Ballet Theatre's LE CORSAIRE
June 19, 2017

Petipa, who of the three choreographers listed in the program has the most influence on American Ballet Theatre's Le Corsaire, knows how to create a dramatic excuse for dance. With a few notable exceptions, 'Giselle' and 'Romeo and Juliet' come instantly to my mind, declarative dance which spends twenty minutes to hammer out an 'I love you' through pirouettes can be draining and leave the audience thinking 'Just spit it out.' Petipa, clearly seeing this dramatic shortcoming, forms his ballets around vast pageants, processionals, and presentations. The Black Swan seduces by exhibition at a banquet, the last glorious act of The Sleeping Beauty is a virtually plotless celebration, and practically the entire Nutcracker is a series of vignettes formed around a presentation. Le Corsaire is no different. The first act features the presentation of several ballerinas. The second act is centered around the principal dancers performing to 'entertain the group'. Then, in act three, a pasha spends a lengthy amount of time in a dream sequence which features, what else, women and flowers. Superficially, this all works wonderfully and the dancers shamelessly take this opportunity to exploit their most acrobatic technique. The piece's issues begin upon the introduction of the words 'slave girls.'

BWW Review: American Ballet Theatre's THE GOLDEN COCKERELBWW Review: American Ballet Theatre's THE GOLDEN COCKEREL
June 8, 2017

1914 is not a year that should conjure much nostalgia for those who survived it. Among smaller aggravations, the year marked the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and resulted in a half decade war, the likes of which the world had not seen. The year also marked the premiere of Fokine's 'The Golden Cockerel' by The Ballets Russes. Fokine, their first choreographer, was no stranger to '(Description) (Bird)' pieces whether it be 'The Dying Swan,' 'The Firebird,' or 'The Gold Cockerel.' 'The Golden Cockerel' was in his established career and it, unlike the previous year's infamous 'Rite of Spring,' was a jewel box escape from the hostile international climate. The warmth of this piece served a Parisian audience in search of the early 1910's glow, which was probably a distant memory by then. Today, scrupulously mounted by ABT under the direction of Ratmansky and with designs by Richard Hudson (off of the Natalia Goncharova originals,) 'The Golden Cockerel' is a charming aesthetic study even as it has waned as a satisfying evening of dance.

BWW Review: NEW YORK CITY BALLET's THE DECALOGUEBWW Review: NEW YORK CITY BALLET's THE DECALOGUE
May 24, 2017

Justin Peck's newest work, 'The Decalogue,' was placed at the far end of a daunting program this past Thursday as part of New York City Ballet's expansive 'Here/Now' festival. Following Lynne Taylor-Corbett's resonate 'Chiaroscuro,' Jorma Elo's sublime 'Slice to Sharp,' and Peter Martins' transportive, if overlong, 'Stabat Mater,' the sting of anticlimax would have been difficult to avoid for even the most robust work. The evening's narrative was moving to an aesthetic statement, but riding these pieces was also a burden of archaic catharsis which 'The Decalogue' is not equipped to shoulder. However, if dislodged from the context of the program, Justin Peck's newest work represents his most mature excavation of dance form and gives hope that ballet can be not simply dressed up in new fashion, but have its soil tilled for invigorating innovation.

BWW Review: NEW YORK CITY BALLET's New Combinations 2017BWW Review: NEW YORK CITY BALLET's New Combinations 2017
February 6, 2017

A review of three works presented at the New York City Ballet's 'New Works' program.



1