Wesley Doucette

Wesley Doucette Wesley Doucette is a New York based director/choreographer currently getting his Masters in Theatre and Culture at the Université d'Avignon. Recently he worked as assistant director on Masterworks Theatre Company's inaugural production of "The Glass Menagerie." His director credits include Tiny Rhino, "The Rite of Spring," a studio production of Brecht/Weill's "The Threepenny Opera," and the medieval morality play "Everyman." He is currently undertaking a new iteration of "Everyman" which enjoyed a development presentation at Dixon Place. This production will be performed upstate in 2016 under the artistic mentorship of world renowned dance/theatre artist Maureen Fleming. He is also stage manager for Maureen Fleming Company. He writes for The Andygram Blog and is a frequent contributor to The New York Theatre Review. He was a member of The Orchard Project's apprenticeship, "The Core Company," in 2013.


MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents LE NOZZE DI FIGAROBWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents LE NOZZE DI FIGARO
Posted: Oct. 25, 2018


BWW Review: New York City Ballet's ALL BALANCHINEBWW Review: New York City Ballet's ALL BALANCHINE
Posted: May. 6, 2019


BWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents L'OPERA DE QUAT'SOUSBWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents L'OPERA DE QUAT'SOUS
Posted: Nov. 28, 2018


BWW Review: HARLEQUINADE at the American Ballet TheatreBWW Review: HARLEQUINADE at the American Ballet Theatre
Posted: May. 20, 2019


BWW Review: NYCB Classic at Lincoln CenterBWW Review: NYCB Classic at Lincoln Center
Posted: Feb. 14, 2019


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents £¥€$ by Ontroerend Goed
July 29, 2019

Compagnie flamande, Ontroerend Goed s'est spécialisée dans des spectacles situés à la lisière du théâtre et de la performance artistique. Avec £¥a??$, qui peut se lire Lies, Eyes ou encore " Livre, Yen, Euro, Dollar ", la compagnie cherche à retranscrire les lois du marché financier en créant un endroit à mi-chemin entre un casino clandestin et une salle des marchés. La performance est interactive, 84 personnes sont réparties sur douze tables qui vont chacune représenter un marché financier dont les sept personnes qui y sont attablées seront les banques faisant vivre ce marché. Les douze tables réunies forment un marché international qui fluctue en fonction des transactions. Le but principal de cette performance interactive est d'introduire les spectateurs dans le petit monde des plus riches, des banquiers et des traders.

BWW Review: UN HOMME by Ultima Necat at LA CASERNE
July 29, 2019

Basée sur une nouvelle de Charles Bukowski titré Un Homme tiré du recueil Au sud de nulle part publié en 1973. L'histoire de la pièce se résume à ces quelques phrases : Constance a plaqué Walter. Elle vient retrouver George, amenant une bouteille de Whiskey. La pièce est trilingue, elle est en français, en espagnol et en anglais.

BWW Review: American Ballet Theatre's SWAN LAKE
July 8, 2019

Swan Lake is an icon, the Hamlet of the ballet world and, much like Hamlet, audiences might need reminding that it is more than images and a melody; it is a bizarre and symphonic evening-length work of poetry. ABT's production puts full faith in the breadth of this work, leaving the magical and melodramatic elements leaning more towards camp than enchantment. Luckily, the capacity of Swan Lake to present the expressivity of the human form is on full display. With principal dancer Hee Seo leading the performance as an Odette seemingly etched in glass, the centrality of Swan Lake to the choreographic art form is reaffirmed.

BWW Review: HARLEQUINADE at the American Ballet Theatre
May 20, 2019

ABT's choreographer, Alexei Ratmansky, has pulled out all the stops for his earnest revival of Petipa's oft-forgotten 1900 hit, Harlequinade, now in performance at The Met Opera. Based off of the commedia dell'arte tradition, it should be the best of two worlds, combining both the

BWW Review: ON THIS SIDE OF THE WORLD by PAULO TIROL
May 24, 2019

On This Side of the World, now playing at Access Theatre, has a cast that would make any production green with envy. From song to song they deliver both a technical high gloss and a go for broke sincerity. They perform with the conviction of actors who know that what they're undertaking is important and, indeed, it is. What is offered by this hour and a half long song cycle is a rare ground floor view of the lives of the Filipino community. However, this gloss doesn't just describe the technical quality of the musicianship of both the cast and orchestra, but also the manufactured sheen of the musical composition, which investigates little.

BWW Review: New York City Ballet's ALL BALANCHINE
May 6, 2019

This past year, while attending an extraordinary program at Paris's Opéra Garnier which featured the Paris Opera Ballet tackling, among other works, Pina Bausch's Rite of Spring, I wondered to myself, 'Why is New York still the house of Balanchine?' Sure, it could be argued other choreographers have made their mark on the company, from Robbins to Wheeldon to Peck, but the basic machinery of the pieces and their executions is consistently Balanchine in a way that Paris isn't Nureyev. Lincoln Center is nearly as synonymous with Balanchine as Bayreuth is with Wagner. Happily, this past Tuesday's four-part 'All Balanchine' program was an excellent justification for the company's conservation of the choreographer's composition and indelible flair.

Festival d'Avignon Announces Summer Season
April 15, 2019

This month Artistic Director Olivier Py unveiled the poster for the 73rd Festival d'Avignon, which will take place in the medieval city between July 4th and 23rd. Painted by Syrian artist Miryan Haddad, the work is a vibrant contrast to the previous festival's forlorn group of melancholy, monochrome children. Exploding with energy, the painting is a dreamscape, which features a portal, framing a sunlit lake. Like the Festival theme, odyssey, it promises adventure, danger, and hope. This concept of 'odyssey' is not locked in the ancient world, but extends to contemporary experiences, particularly the lives of refugees, as well as the state of theatre itself as a journey into the unknown.

BWW Review: THE DIARY OF THE ONE WHO DISAPPEARED at BAM
April 10, 2019

Under the direction of Ivo Van Hove, Czech composer's Leos Janacek's song cycle, The Diary of One Who Disappeared, is given a rare performance by Muziektheater Transparant.

BWW Review: NYCB Classic at Lincoln Center
February 14, 2019

The NYCB's five-part 'Classic NYCB' program, performed this past Wednesday, February 6th at Lincoln Center, featured a broad choreographic landscape. Through the work of four choreographers and spanning four decades, the evening featured not only the 'Classic NYCB,' as promised by the program title, but also a rare brand of 'Iconoclastic NYCB.' While some audiences might be nostalgic for the glory of 50's Balanchine, this evening proved that perhaps the best is yet to come and that even Balanchine did not shy away from experimentation as he reached towards artistic relevancy.

BWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents L'OPERA DE QUAT'SOUS
November 28, 2018

Brecht and Weill's The Threepenny Opera (l'Opera de Quat'Sous in French) is one of those works that became the hallmark of its era. Its sound, its look, and its cynicism are pure Weimar. However, during the 1928 Berlin premiere, early songs such as 'The Ballad of Mac The Knife' and 'Pirate Jenny' landed with a shrug, and it wasn't until the 'Canon Song,' halfway through the first act, that the audience became engaged. All of this to say that The Threepenny Opera is a complicated play whose virtues might not be immediately evident to the uninitiated. The production at Avignon's Opera Confluence, as directed by Jean Lacornerie, comes in at a swift two hours without intermission. While crammed onto an over-packed stage and breathlessly paced, Lacornerie still manages to keep the action moving with style.

BWW Review: OPERA GRAND AVIGNON Presents LE NOZZE DI FIGARO
October 25, 2018

Avignon's Opéra Confluence is a challenging space, located some kilometers outside the town center near the TGV train station. It was recently constructed as a temporary theatre space while the city 19th century opera house undergoes significant restoration. The interior of the space resembles an exposed wood warehouse with red chairs. At the far end of the theatre, rather than the proscenium filling out the audience view, a yawning black screen fills the space, with the center third cut out for the performance. This scenic letterbox effect, coupled with the added distance made by the pit orchestra, makes dramatic intimacy and scenic delicacy difficult. Opéra Grand Avignon's production of Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro, under the stage direction of Stephan Grögler, turned what is at times a distant screen, into an enchanting diorama in which Grögler sure-footedly welcomes the enchanting tonal and aesthetic contradictions of the 18th century opera.

BWW Review: BALLET NATIONAL DE MARSEILLE at Avignon's OPERA CONFLUENCE
October 11, 2018

On the sides and upstage a dense curtain of chains hangs, framing the dance space. It is a stark wasteland. Thankfully, choreographers Emio Greco and Pieter C. Scholten's fascinating movement vocabulary and exciting theatricality rescue the evening's program from becoming a moralizing dirge. The works, Extremalism and Bolero, navigate catastrophe with invention and without pity. In both of the pieces, presented October 6th 2018 at Avignon's Opéra Confluence, the effects of disaster, most noticeably physical exhaustion and emotional disassociation, propel the movement of the incredibly talented performers of the Ballet National de Marseille.

BWW Review: AUDREY SCHEBAT'S LA PERRUCHE
October 8, 2018

In Audrey Schebat's La Perruche a married couple, while waiting for their friends to attend a small soiree, fall into disagreement and start to analyze the nature of their relationship. This couple, male and female, don a veritable wardrobe of well-worn married archetypes. Throughout the play we witness 1950's dynamics, 1990's sitcom banter, what feels like an allusion to A Doll's House, and contemporary technology. These masks, coupled with little analysis of social circumstances that somehow brought them to this state in 2018, create a loss of dramatic intimacy. However, actors Arie Elmaleh and Barbara Schulz are superb as they emit heat and passion within the artifice.

BWW Review: COMPAGNIE DU VINGT TROIS Presents FOOL FOR LOVE
September 24, 2018

Our heritage might define us, but it doesn't get to define itself. Over the past decades we've witnessed as heroic archetypes turned dated, or even villainous. We've watched as the emotional collateral of a masculine old guard has been given a platform. From this vantage point such voices have shifted the focus from the passions of privileged men, to the scars of those left in their wake. Fool For Love by Sam Shepard is an aggressive portrayal of this passing. The play's location, a motel in the once wild west, is the embodiment of this contradiction: quotidian mediocrity, and mythic Americana. The Parisian Compagnie du Vingt-Trois withholds not a drop of the emotional intensity of this piece in their performance at Avignon's Pixel Theatre.

BWW Review: BIG DEAL, BOB FOSSE AND DANCE IN THE AMERICAN MUSICAL By KEVIN WINKLER
August 3, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CERTAINES N'AVAIENT JAMAIS VU LA MER By RICHARD BRUNEL
July 27, 2018

Based on Julie Otsuka's novel The Buddha in the Attic, Certaines n'Avaient Jamais Vu La Mer, in performance in the Avignon Theatre Festival's Cloitre des Carmes, is a look at the lives of Japanese immigrants in America from the turn of the 20th century to FDR's internment camps. Director Richard Brunel's multimedia and elemental staging is supremely inventive, and the performances spark with vitality. Those familiar with the history might find themselves treading familiar territory. However, Certaines n'Avaient Jamais Vu La Mer can serve for some as a theatrically dynamic introduction to one of America's great historic shames.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents MEDUSE By LES BÂTARDS DORES
July 25, 2018

As my time attending performances in the Avignon Festival's 'In' comes to a close there are certain consistencies that float to the surface. Among these are nudity, bodily fluids, video integration, and a spectacular quality of sound design. Les Batard Dore's Meduse, now in performance in the Avignon Theatre Festival's Gymanse du Lycee St Joseph, has a bit, or a lot, of each. However, even in as such lofty company as the Avignon Theatre Festival, Leny Bernay's soundscape is transporting. Translating mental anguish, the sea, and dizzying poetry in a heart rumbling bass his presence is a boon to Les Batards Dores extremely promising production.

BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents CANZONE PER ORNELLA By RAIMUND HOGHE
July 24, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents STORY WATER By EMANUEL GAT
July 22, 2018


BWW Review: AVIGNON THEATRE FESTIVAL Presents ARCTIQUE By ANNE-CECILE VANDALEM
July 23, 2018

Anne-Cecile Vandalem's Arctique, now in production at the Avignon Theatre Festival's La FabricA, is a spectacular and rare diversion in a program laden with portentous prophesying. Equal parts Black Mirror and Murder on the Orient Express, Arctique is set after the fall of global warming in 2025. Though, never mind that, the downfall of world order is simply a social backdrop. Doubt not however that Vandalem has made a deep social mythology to rival the best of the speculative fiction genre. It's just that, dramatically speaking, she simply has more pressing matters to deal with.



1