Skip to main content Skip to footer site map
Review Roundup: FEDORA Opens at the Metropolitan Opera; What Did the Critics Think?

Review Roundup: FEDORA Opens at the Metropolitan Opera; What Did the Critics Think?

Performances run through January 28.

Fedora officially opened at the Metropolitan Opera on New Year's Eve, December 31. Performances run through January 28.

Umberto Giordano's exhilarating drama returns to the Met repertory for the first time in 25 years. Packed with memorable melody, showstopping arias, and explosive confrontations, Fedora requires a cast of thrilling voices to take flight, and the Met's new production promises to deliver.

Soprano Sonya Yoncheva, one of today's most riveting artists, sings the title role of the 19th-century Russian princess who falls in love with her fiancé's murderer, Count Loris, sung by star tenor Piotr Beczała. Soprano Rosa Feola is the Countess Olga, Fedora's confidante, and baritone Lucas Meachem is the diplomat De Siriex, with Met maestro Marco Armiliato conducting. Director David McVicar delivers a detailed and dramatic staging based around an ingenious fixed set that, like a Russian nesting doll, unfolds to reveal the opera's three distinctive settings-a palace in St. Petersburg, a fashionable Parisian salon, and a picturesque villa in the Swiss Alps.

Read the reviews below!


Richard Sasanow, BroadwayWorld: The opera seemed to supply the audience with a helluva good time, despite a plot that even left the creators of the production scratching their heads, as detailed in a New York Times feature a couple of days earlier, and enough melodrama for a half-dozen silent movies. (It made me long for the days before subtitles came to the Met.) The production's creators made much of the difficulties those involved seemed to have making sense of Colautti's libretto.

Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times: The soprano Sonya Yoncheva and the tenor Piotr Beczala, playing aristocrats locked in a series of betrayals and counter-betrayals, passionately loved and raged; the conductor Marco Armiliato and the Met's orchestra brought restrained silkiness out of the pit; David McVicar's staging was bustling and handsome. A good time was had by all.

Rick Perdian, New York Classical Review: Mirella Freni, the last soprano to sing Fedora at the Met, exuded majesty and restrained passion. By comparison, Yoncheva was more imperious and dangerous, singing with a freedom that was not evident in either her solo recital or as Élisabeth de Valois in Verdi's Don Carlos last season. Fedora's emotional tempest kindled emotions in Yoncheva which resulted in free-flowing, voluptuous sound that equalled the physical glamour that she brought to the role.

Harry Rose, Parterre: The physical production, save for Brigitte Reiffenstuel's sumptuous gowns and the numerous lovely coiffures and wigs, looks cheap. Charles Edward's set, which deteriorates into abstraction starting in Act I, looks under-furnished yet cluttered with several dangling ceiling panels that suggest a theatre, a barn and a disorganized linen closet simultaneously. Adam Silverman's lighting is subtle, though certain cues will likely tighten up as the run progresses. Marco Armiliato's approach in the orchestra pit was similarly uncreative, though the strings in particular played beautifully.

To read more reviews, click here!

BroadwayWorld Shop
Shop BroadwayWorld

Shop this season's new musicals! Get dressed up for a night at the theatre, or just a night at home, with merch from some of Broadway's biggest hits including SOME LIKE IT HOT, KIMBERLY AKIMBO, and more!

Start Shopping



Related Stories
VIDEO: Stephanie J. Block Sings As If We Never Said Goodbye at the Kennedy Center Photo
Watch Stephanie J. Block perform 'As If We Never Said Goodbye' in the Kennedy Center Broadway Center Stage production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Tony Award-winning Best Musical, Sunset Boulevard. 

Review: SUNSET BOULEVARD at Eisenhower Theatre at The Kennedy Center Photo
Tony award winner Stephanie J. Block brings real Broadway star power to Sunset Boulevard, the latest installment of the Kennedy Center's Broadway Center Stage series, currently playing in the Eisenhower Theatre through February 8th.

VIDEO: ROOM Releases Trailer Featuring Adrienne Warren Photo
Watch the new trailer of ROOM on Broadway featuring Tony Award-winner Adrienne Warren.

VIDEO: Ben Platt and Noah Galvin Talk New Film THEATER CAMP on PBS NewsHour Photo
Watch Ben Platt and Noah Galvin discuss their engagement and new film Theatre Camp with PBS NewsHour.


From This Author - Review Roundups


Review Roundup: TITUS ANDRONICUS at Shakespeare's GlobeReview Roundup: TITUS ANDRONICUS at Shakespeare's Globe
February 3, 2023

Read the reviews for Titus Andronicus at Shakespeare's Globe.

Review Roundup: What Did the Critics Make of LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS, Starring Jenna Coleman and Aidan Turner?Review Roundup: What Did the Critics Make of LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS LEMONS, Starring Jenna Coleman and Aidan Turner?
February 1, 2023

What did the critics have to say about Sam Steiner's 2015 play?

Review Roundup: SOUND OF THE UNDERGROUND at the Royal Court TheatreReview Roundup: SOUND OF THE UNDERGROUND at the Royal Court Theatre
January 26, 2023

Read the reviews for Travis Alabanza’s Sound of the Underground, now playing at the Royal Court Theatre.

Review Roundup: THE UNFRIEND at the Criterion TheatreReview Roundup: THE UNFRIEND at the Criterion Theatre
January 20, 2023

Following its acclaimed sold-out run at Chichester Festival Theatre, The Unfriend has now opened in the West End for a strictly limited run from 15 January. This riotous dark comedy from writer Steven Moffat and director Mark Gatiss, the award- winning team behind BBC's Sherlock, stars an uproarious cast including Reece Shearsmith, Amanda Abington and Frances Barber. What did the critics think of Steven Moffat's dark comedy?

Review Roundup: WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? at Theatre Royal BathReview Roundup: WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? at Theatre Royal Bath
January 19, 2023

Read the reviews for Theatre Royal Bath Productions' of Edward Albee's masterpiece Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at the Ustinov Studio in Bath.