Movement Makers Dance Workshop and Gallery Tour for Children Set for the Jewish Museum, 2/17

Movement Makers Dance Workshop and Gallery Tour for Children Set for the Jewish Museum, 2/17

The Jewish Museum is offering Movement Makers, a dance workshop and gallery tour on Sunday, February 17 at 10:30 am. Participants can explore creativity through movement with dancer Ashton McCullough, learning expressive techniques for putting the body in motion. This specially created program for children ages 8 to 12 is inspired by the Museum's current exhibition, Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol.

Installation view of Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol exhibition at The Jewish Museum, New York City. Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels; Blum & Poe, Los Angeles; and neugerriemschneider, Berlin. Photo by Alex Slade.

Tickets are $18 per adult; $13 per child; $15 adult Jewish Museum family level member; and $11 child Jewish Museum family level member. Adults are asked to accompany their children. For further information regarding, the public may call 212.423.3337. Program tickets can be purchased online at TheJewishMuseum.org.

Ashton McCullough, a New York-based holistic dance artist and educator, is the founder of Wyrd Dance Project. His dances have been featured at The Gallo Center for the Arts, Times Square Arts Center, Milbank Chapel, Judson Church, and Aaron Davis Hall. He has conducted classes and workshops for kids, university dancers, and professionals in the US and abroad, and is currently designing a movement program for Columbia University's Head Start program.

The Jewish Museum is presenting Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol, the East Coast premiere of Sharon Lockhart's latest body of work, through March 24, 2013. In this exhibition, co-organized by the Los Angeles Museum of Art (LACMA) and The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Lockhart engages the legacy of Noa Eshkol, the Israeli dance composer, theorist, and textile artist who created an innovative notation system that describes virtually every perceptible movement of the body. This exhibition explores aspects of Eshkol's extraordinary practice through several mediums. For the five-channel installation Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol (2011), Lockhart filmed seven dancers in various combinations performing five compositions by Eshkol, each set against a selection of Eshkol's "wall carpets," or textile works. The concepts behind Eshkol's dances are illustrated by spherical models made of wire and mesh, which Eshkol constructed as a teaching aid for the notation method. A series of still photographs by Lockhart documents these objects and conveys the logic of movement they are meant to illustrate in groupings of two to five prints. The film installation and photographic series are accompanied by a selection of documents, notes, and drawings from Eshkol's archive, shedding light on particular aspects of her creative process. In the exhibition's final gallery, Lockhart installed two vibrant examples of Eshkol's work as a textile artist. The "wall carpets," as Eshkol called them, were assembled without cutting any new material, using only found scraps of fabric. The dancers participated by sorting the scraps and sewing the final arrangements. Eventually some 500 wall carpets were created, representing a substantial aspect of Eshkol's oeuvre. Lockhart's five-channel film marks the first occasion in which Eshkol's work in movement and textiles is brought together.

The Edgar M. Bronfman Center for Education's school and family programs are supported by endowed funds established by the Bronfman Family, the Muriel and William Rand Fund, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Rosalie Klein Adolf, the Kekst Family, and Mrs. Ida C. Schwartz in memory of Mr. Bernard S. Schwartz. We thank the following for their generosity: the Kekst Family, Capital One, MetLife Foundation, J.E. and Z.B. Butler Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., Alpern Family Foundation, The Pumpkin Foundation at the request of Joseph H. and Carol F. Reich, Newman's Own Foundation, Epstein Teicher Philanthropies, Rose M. Badgeley Residuary Charitable Trust, Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, The Jewish Museum Volunteer Organization, and other donors. We gratefully acknowledge public support from: New York State Council on the Arts, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, New York City Department of Youth and Community Development, New York City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn, Council Member Daniel R. Garodnick, Council Member Brad Lander, Council Member Mark Weprin, and other City Council Members.

Comment & Share

About Author

Subscribe to Author Alerts