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Review: THE CHER SHOW, The Kings Theatre Glasgow

Review: THE CHER SHOW, The Kings Theatre Glasgow

Just like the Pop Queen herself, when you think the show has gone big, it goes even bigger

Review: THE CHER SHOW, The Kings Theatre Glasgow When a musical has to provide a pre-show warning of flashing lights, loud music and strobing effects, you know that's a recipe for a wonderful night out for those who are strong enough.

However, what would you expect from a musical based on a legendary global artist who does not have the term "subtle" in her vocabulary. The Cher Show tells the rags to riches to rags then back to riches life story of Cher. And just like the Pop Queen herself, when you think the show has gone big, it goes even bigger.

In a similar style to Jersey Boys the Musical, this show uses the artist as the narrator. In a clever twist, Cher is portrayed through three incarnations of herself, Babe, Lady and Star. Each displays a different era of Cher's career, while also providing confidence and reflection to each other throughout the story.

And boy do the Chers shine. Initially there is an apprehension when the dialogue begins, because Cher is overtly unique in her voice and mannerisms. It would be extremely easy for the stars to vamp into a Drag Queen/impersonator version of the lady herself. Thankfully the West End calibre of talent keeps any of those previous nerves at bay.

Millie O'Connell as Babe evolves on stage from a shy innocent child right up to a household name. It really is a joy to watch an actor display character development with such ease. Danielle Steers as Lady is a powerhouse of talent, with a vocal that commands attention and fills the theatre. Debbie Kurup as Star proves once again why she is a legend of theatre. Vocally spot on, with Oscar-worthy acting ability.

When the three Chers sing together, the magic truly happens. Each brings their own unique spin on the legend at that age in time, but there is a throw thread of hair flicks and hand claps keeping them united, even with subtle differences.

With the juggernaut of energy split into three leading ladies, it does not leave much scope for supporting characters to sparkle. Yet the full cast are a talented ensemble that never let the momentum dip. Especially in the dance numbers by choreographer Oti Mabuse. Guy Woolf, as Cher's major love and TV sidekick Sonny, is a perfect casting choice. They hold their own with each manifestation of Cher, and there is a genuine chemistry between the couple. Sam Ferriday gets to represent a multitude of characters, but particularly stands out as heartthrob Gregg Allman.

What might surprise the most is the story driven nature of the production. With a larger than life persona as Cher in the spotlights, it would have been easy to go down a Priscilla Queen of the Desert all glitter and glamour route. Instead, under direction of theatre icon Arlene Phillips, The Cher Show is full of emotion, and at times sombre. Rick Elice's script delivers comedy throughout, which keeps the spirit of the show up and highlights one of Cher's most recognisable gifts, her humour.

The light and shade is also reflected in Gabriella Slade's costume design, and Tom Rogers set design. At times it feels like the stage could do with more colour, but the monochrome set does make the props and every sequin pop, while keeping focus on the three Chers.

The Cher Show is a fabulous night out that does incredible justice to a star with as long and varied career as Cher. I do believe all gypsies, tramps and thieves should shoop down to their nearest theatre and book a ticket.

The Cher Show runs at The Kings Theatre Glasgow until 1 October, then continues on a UK tour.



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Review: THE CHER SHOW, The Kings Theatre GlasgowReview: THE CHER SHOW, The Kings Theatre Glasgow
September 28, 2022

When a musical has to provide a pre-show warning of flashing lights, loud music and strobing effects, you know that’s a recipe for a wonderful night out for those who are strong enough. What would you expect from a musical based on a legendary global artist who does not have the term “subtle” in her vocabulary.

BWW Review: HEATHERS THE MUSICAL, Edinburgh PlayhouseBWW Review: HEATHERS THE MUSICAL, Edinburgh Playhouse
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Heathers The Musical is a dark comedy, with the emphasis on the dark, making the comedy at times uncomfortable. A horror story in bold colours and bright songs. Yet it is surprising how entertaining and enjoyable a show can be with a story so unlikeable.