THE SLOWEST WAVE Comes to Triskelion's Muriel Schulman Theater in October

Performances are on Thursday, October 6 through Saturday, October 8, 2022 at 8pm.

By: Aug. 24, 2022
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THE SLOWEST WAVE Comes to Triskelion's Muriel Schulman Theater in October

Triskelion Arts, in collaboration with Vangeline Theater/ New York Butoh Institute, presents the World Premiere of The Slowest Wave, a pioneering project combining butoh and neuroscience, on Thursday, October 6 through Saturday, October 8, 2022 at 8pm at Triskelion's Muriel Schulman Theater, 106 Calyer Street, Brooklyn, NYC (entrance on Banker Street).

Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit vangeline.com/calendar-of-upcoming-events/2022/10/6/the-slowest-wave.

In collaboration with neuroscientists Sadye Paez, Constantina Theofanopoulou and Jose 'Pepe' Contreras-Vidal, and composer Ray Sweeten, Vangeline choreographed a 60-minute ensemble butoh piece, which is uniquely informed by the protocol being established for a scientific pilot study researching the impact of butoh on brain activity. Vangeline and Sweeten are building on a 20-year history of creative collaboration with a soundscape that is informed by techniques of brainwave entrainment (techniques that affect consciousness through sound). The Slowest Wave investigates the relationship between human consciousness and dance through the use of scalp electroencephalography (EEG); and will foster connections and understanding between dancers, artists, scientists, engineers, and audiences from around the world.

As part of Vangeline's upcoming Gibney Dance in Process Artist Residency in January 2023, the dancers' brain activity will be recorded for the pilot study at the University of Houston, Texas, culminating in a live performance, with real-time visualization of the dancers' neural synchrony and slow brain wave activity. Results will then be disseminated in scientific journals.

For more information about Vangeline and her work, visit vangeline.com.




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