AMERICAN MASTERS Season Finale Will Explore Life of Helen Keller

The season finale will air on PBS October 19.

By: Sep. 16, 2021
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AMERICAN MASTERS Season Finale Will Explore Life of Helen Keller

American Masters: Becoming Helen Keller examines one of the 20th century's human rights pioneers in honor of National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The new documentary rediscovers the complex life and legacy of author and activist Helen Keller (1880-1968), who was deaf and blind since childhood, exploring how she used her celebrity and wit to advocate for social justice, particularly for women, workers, people with disabilities and people living in poverty.

Closing the series' 35th season, American Masters: Becoming Helen Keller premieres nationwide Tuesday, October 19 at 9 p.m. on PBS.

American Masters tells Keller's story through rarely seen photographs, archival film clips and interviews with historians, scholars and disability rights advocates. Narrated by author, psychotherapist and disability rights advocate Rebecca Alexander, the film features on-camera performances from Tony- and Emmy Award-winning actor Cherry Jones reading Keller's writings.

Actor and dancer Alexandria Wailes provides American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation of Keller's words with all other ASL interpretation by writer and rapper Warren "WAWA" Snipe. The program also features audio description by National Captioning Institute and closed captioning by VITAC.

Keller first came into public view at a young age, soon after her teacher Anne Sullivan taught her to communicate. As she progressed through her education, graduating from Radcliffe College, Keller steadily gained international attention. Though she lived until age 87, became an accomplished writer and activist, Keller continues to be immortalized as a child, such as in the U.S. Capitol with the statue of her at a water pump. She recounted this moment from her youth in her first autobiography, "The Story of My Life," later made famous by the book's stage and screen adaptation, "The Miracle Worker."



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