Aliya Al-Hassan

Aliya Al-Hassan


MOST POPULAR ARTICLES
LAST 30 DAYS

BWW Review: MARNIE, London ColiseumBWW Review: MARNIE, London Coliseum
Posted: Nov. 19, 2017


BWW Review: JAMAICA INN, Tabard TheatreBWW Review: JAMAICA INN, Tabard Theatre
Posted: Nov. 11, 2017


BWW Review: DEATHTRAP, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: DEATHTRAP, Richmond Theatre
Posted: Nov. 15, 2017


BWW Review: POISON, Orange Tree TheatreBWW Review: POISON, Orange Tree Theatre
Posted: Nov. 7, 2017


BWW Review: RULES FOR LIVING, Rose TheatreBWW Review: RULES FOR LIVING, Rose Theatre
Posted: Nov. 9, 2017


LAST 365 DAYS

BWW Review: THE ADDAMS FAMILY, New Wimbledon TheatreBWW Review: THE ADDAMS FAMILY, New Wimbledon Theatre
Posted: May. 17, 2017


BWW Review: OLIVER TWIST, Regent's Park Open Air TheatreBWW Review: OLIVER TWIST, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre
Posted: Jul. 24, 2017


BWW Review: THE BEST MAN, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: THE BEST MAN, Richmond Theatre
Posted: Oct. 3, 2017


BWW Review: FOOTLOOSE, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: FOOTLOOSE, Richmond Theatre
Posted: May. 16, 2017


BWW Review: AN OCTOROON, Orange Tree TheatreBWW Review: AN OCTOROON, Orange Tree Theatre
Posted: May. 25, 2017


BWW Review: MARNIE, London ColiseumBWW Review: MARNIE, London Coliseum
November 19, 2017

After a season that saw some triumphant returns of classic operas, such as the magnificent revival Jonathan Miller's The Barber of Seville, the ENO has taken another gamble on bringing a brand new production to the stage of the London Coliseum. Following Two Boys in 2011, Marnie is the young composer Nico Muhly's second world premiere for ENO.

BWW Review: DEATHTRAP, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: DEATHTRAP, Richmond Theatre
November 15, 2017

The British appetite for thrillers is seemingly unquenchable. Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap has now been running for 65 years in London and detective and murder mystery stories are standard Sunday night television fare. Adam Penfold's revival of Ira Levin's 1978 Broadway hit Deathtrap is obviously intended to take advantage to that public craving for a thriller. Unfortunately, after a promising start, this production fails to either shock or thrill.

BWW Review: JAMAICA INN, Tabard TheatreBWW Review: JAMAICA INN, Tabard Theatre
November 11, 2017

Daphne du Maurier is the master of Cornish gothic storytelling and ghostly intrigue. Jamaica Inn is her 1936 novel; a haunting tale set in Cornwall in the 1800s. Following the death of her mother, Mary Yellan goes to live with her downtrodden aunt Patience and bullying uncle Joss in mysterious Jamaica Inn. She soon discovers mysterious goings on in the dead of night and deadly events taking place on the Cornish coast, which draw her in to a dark and ghostly world of murder and theft.

BWW Review: RULES FOR LIVING, Rose TheatreBWW Review: RULES FOR LIVING, Rose Theatre
November 9, 2017

With the release of the Christmas advert from Marks And Spencer, we can all rest assured that the festive season is drawing ever near. Sam Holcroft's well received play, Rules For Living, gets its first revival at Kingston's Rose after a 2015 run at The National Theatre and serves as a timely reminder of just how stressful a traditional family Christmas can become.

BWW Review: POISON, Orange Tree TheatreBWW Review: POISON, Orange Tree Theatre
November 7, 2017

A bereaved couple meet after a long separation. Stilted pleasantries give way to raw accusations and brutal truths. It would be very easy for Poison to be a melodramatic hour and twenty minutes of trite pain, closure and gaining the strength to move on. Thankfully this UK premiere of Lot Vekemans' critically acclaimed two-hander avoids all such obvious clich s to produce a production of immense subtlety and sensitivity.

BWW Review: DUET FOR ONE, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: DUET FOR ONE, Richmond Theatre
October 24, 2017

There is always a risk in seemingly simple dramatic two-handers. Where there are no visual tricks, no impressive set changes or sparkling costumes, the whole play relies on the chemistry and repartee between the two actors. Robin Lefevre's excellent revival of Tom Kempinski's Duet For One needs no trickery to make its simple structure incredibly compelling.

Flute Theatre's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, Orange Tree TheatreFlute Theatre's A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, Orange Tree Theatre
October 18, 2017

Immersive theatre is a popular and fashionable way of presenting work where the audience are not passive observers, but are involved and become part of the production. After last year's inspiring performances of The Tempest, Flute Theatre's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream is their latest show, designed specifically as an immersive theatrical experience for autistic children and their families.

BWW Review: TOSCA, King's Head TheatreBWW Review: TOSCA, King's Head Theatre
October 12, 2017

Adam Spreadbury-Maher has a long history with the King's Head Theatre. As its Artistic Director and co-founder of OperaUpClose, he has overseen many successful opera productions, including The Coronation of Poppea and the multi award-winning La Boh me. Set in the tiny space behind the pub bar, every production has retained an intimacy that can only be achieved when the producer has neither the space nor the cash for bigger things. This remains a unique experience for the audience and showcases opera like nowhere else.

EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT JAMIE Rehearsals Are In Full SwingEVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT JAMIE Rehearsals Are In Full Swing
October 12, 2017

After receiving rave reviews during its run at Sheffield's Crucible Theatre, new musical Everyone's Talking About Jamie is making the final preparations for its transfer to the Apollo Theatre in November. Broadway World UK was incredibly excited to get an early preview into how rehearsals are going for what is expected to be a new hit West End show.

BWW Review: THE BARBER OF SEVILLE, London ColiseumBWW Review: THE BARBER OF SEVILLE, London Coliseum
October 8, 2017

It is said that Rossini wrote his most famous opera, The Barber of Seville, in three weeks, but few opere buffe remain as fresh and funny as this one. The well known plot of cunning barber Figaro's attempts to unite Count Almaviva with beautiful Rosina, as they try to outwit her elderly guardian Dr Bartolo is as engaging today as it ever was.

BWW Review: THE BEST MAN, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: THE BEST MAN, Richmond Theatre
October 3, 2017

Playwright Gore Vidal was well placed to have in depth knowledge of what goes on behind the scenes in US politics. After all, his mother was the daughter of a Democratic senator and his father worked for Franklin Roosevelt. His interest and involvement in politics led to The Best Man, which made its Broadway debut in 1960 and received six Tony Award nominations. Set in a Philadelphia hotel during the 1960 presidential nominating convention, there is no doubt that the workings of American politics have changed somewhat since that time. To appreciate the jeopardy and drama within the play, it is worth understanding that back then, there were often many more deadlocks and last minute dramas to these conventions than now, when the presidential nominees are chosen much earlier.

BWW Review: THE WIPERS TIMES, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: THE WIPERS TIMES, Richmond Theatre
September 27, 2017

Amid the horrors of the First World War, The Wipers Times is the unlikely, but true, story of when two officers found a printing press in the bombed out remains of Ypres (Wipers was the soldier's nickname for the town) and decided to produce a satirical paper to lift the spirits of the men. The paper could not print any details of the war due to censorship and so it concentrated on the absurd side of life in the trenches by lampooning the government, generals and mocking all the conditions of war.

BWW Review: WAIT UNTIL DARK, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: WAIT UNTIL DARK, Richmond Theatre
September 6, 2017

Wait Until Dark first opened on Broadway in 1966, but many know it from the 1967 Hollywood film, where the lead role of Susy went to Audrey Hepburn, who was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for the role.

BWW Review: THE RAILWAY CHILDREN, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: THE RAILWAY CHILDREN, Richmond Theatre
August 30, 2017

The Railway Children holds a special place in Britain's heart; E Nesbit's well-loved tale was first published in 1905, but most of us know it from Lionel Jeffries' iconic 1970 film, which also made a star of the teenage Jenny Agutter. This new production, faithfully adapted by Dave Simpson, has given a wider national audience the chance to see this classic tale brought to the stage.

BWW Review: DANGLING, Southwark PlayhouseBWW Review: DANGLING, Southwark Playhouse
August 12, 2017

There is a profound darkness to Abigail Hood's new play, Dangling, both in look and in content. A bleak depiction of sexual abuse, mental illness and disturbing family secrets, it looks at stories of two girls who go missing, their circumstances and what happens to those left behind.

BWW Review: OLIVER TWIST, Regent's Park Open Air TheatreBWW Review: OLIVER TWIST, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre
July 24, 2017

There is much about Charles Dickens' Classic tale Oliver Twist to recommend it to children; the comic pomposity of Mr Bumble, the sinister actions of Fagin, the cheekiness of the Artful Dodger and, of course, the adventures and eventual salvation of poor orphan Oliver.

BWW Review: BODIES, Royal CourtBWW Review: BODIES, Royal Court
July 14, 2017

How far would you go to have a baby? What and who would you overlook to make it happen? Vivienne Franzmann has never shied away from controversial subjects in her plays. The 2012, critically acclaimed play The Witness explored the exploitative nature of photojournalism and Pests was based on heroin addiction. In Bodies she turns her attention to the morality surrounding overseas surrogacy.

BWW Review: JANE EYRE, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: JANE EYRE, Richmond Theatre
June 13, 2017

Before the world had an understanding of the word feminism, Charlotte Bronte was delivering a masterpiece tutorial in female independence and emancipation. Jane Eyre demonstrates that being plain and poor is no barrier to a desire for knowledge and the quest for love and liberation. The story is of an unloved orphan girl, sent to boarding school by her callous aunt. Despite a cold and harsh life, Jane eventually becomes a teacher at the school and then moves to become a governess, working for the darkly brooding Mr Rochester. The couple fall in love, but must try to overcome sinister secrets and internal battles about ethics, morality and justice.

BWW Review: THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS, Richmond TheatreBWW Review: THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PYJAMAS, Richmond Theatre
June 7, 2017

Northern Ballet has a reputation for pioneering contemporary, narrative ballet, but this may be its most challenging subject to date. The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas has been a book and later a film, both of which have seen their fair share of controversy. In a tale praised and criticised in equal measure, nine year old Bruno, son of a Nazi commander, befriends Shmuel, a Jewish boy, through the fence of an extermination camp who wears what looks like pyjamas. When Shmuel's father goes missing inside the camp Bruno slips into the camp to help find him, with inevitably tragic results.

BWW Review: AN OCTOROON, Orange Tree TheatreBWW Review: AN OCTOROON, Orange Tree Theatre
May 25, 2017

An Octoroon is a person who has one-eighth black heritage. In 1850s Louisiana, that meant they are automatically unclean and, ultimately, a slave. Branden Jacobs-Jenkins radically reimagines Dion Boucicault's 1859 play based upon a tragic and rather melodramatic love story between white plantation owner George and his uncle's illegitimate daughter Zoe. Entwined in this is the apparent financial ruin of the plantation, which leads to a series of racially motivated violent events.



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