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Bye Bye Birdie and Follies

redmustang
Broadway Star
joined:5/14/03
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 06:43pm
I was asked this question today by a friend: What do the original productions of these two shows have in common?
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Mr Roxy
Broadway Legend
joined:5/17/03
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 06:54pm
They are both musicals.
Cynicism is an unpleasant way of saying the truth - Lillian Hellman.
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ljay889
Broadway Legend
joined:8/4/04
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 07:04pm
The obvious is Susan Watson doing the original Birdie and 2011 revival of Follies. But not sure what it has in common with the original Follies.
#sadandtransparent
redmustang
Broadway Star
joined:5/14/03
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 07:17pm
I've checked the obvious: opening dates, closing dates, # of performances, etc. He said it has nothing to do with casts or plot lines. I will post the answer tomorrow.
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Gomez3
Chorus Member
joined:5/31/14
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 07:27pm
They both were inspired by actual newspaper articles.
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lovebwy
Chorus Member
joined:4/22/12
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 07:30pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmvFK739E_w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAmPZZ-y8ZI

There's a happy little flute riff that's part of both these songs. It's discussed in Ted Chapin's book Everything Was Possible: The Birth of the Musical Follies.

Updated On: 7/27/14 at 07:30 PM
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lovebwy
Chorus Member
joined:4/22/12
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/27/14 at 09:27pm
"During Waiting for the Girls I heard things in the flute and piccolo that reminded me of Bye Bye Birdie. They came during the women's chorus, adding a playful punctuation to the ends of their four descriptive lines. They reminded me of the flute passages from "Put on a Happy Face". I asked Jonathan Tunick about them and he said 'Ah yes. The Ginzler flutes'. Ginzler was the orchestrator of Bye Bye Bridie and one of Tunick's mentors... in the hands of a good ochestrator there's room for appropriate musical quotes or references. Little ornamentations or jokes that can be added and invisible except to those knowledgeable about musical theater."
redmustang
Broadway Star
joined:5/14/03
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 12:24pm
Sorry everyone - my friend thought each show had a song called One Last Kiss. I spanked him.
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 01:21pm
I think we should all make up quizzes based upon wrong answers. It would make the summer pass so much faster.

Q: What do the original productions of Greenwillow and A Hatful of Rain have in common?

A: They both starred Anthony Perkins!
ggersten
Broadway Legend
joined:5/11/06
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 01:57pm
Q. What do "Angels In America" and "Wicked" have in common?
A. Laurence Olivier did not appear in either.
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lovebwy
Broadway Legend
joined:4/22/12
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 02:22pm
It's a perfectly valid question.

They both utilize the Ginzler flutes. I'd noticed it before I even read the Chapin book.
Rinaldo
Understudy
joined:5/5/09
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 03:03pm
Me too, lovebwy. Many arrangers like to bring out the Ginzler flutes when appropriate: Jonathan Tunick did it again for "Manhattan" in Stairway to Paradise. And I hear an instance on Philip Chaffin's newest CD from PS Classics. There's also a startling pre-example in the title song of Louisiana Purchase (1940).
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Bye Bye Birdie and Follies
Posted: 7/31/14 at 03:30pm
It's a nice answer. But it wasn't the answer.