Young Broadway actresses too cool for stage door?

SingAlongMOVIE2
Chorus Member
joined:7/23/12
Thoughts?
Posted: 7/24/12 at 09:28am

Updated On: 8/20/12 at 09:28 AM
siny
Broadway Star
joined:2/8/07
I saw RENT last night and the whole cast came out and signed Playbills, including every female memeber of the cast.
CaissieFan101
Chorus Member
joined:7/16/12
Yes, it is true they all have that in common. I can see one time and they don't come out, but three times, I think that just means they dont like to stage door. But than again, a lot of younger female actresses do, like Teal Wicks, Caissie Levy, Lindsay Mendez and many other young female stars.
SingAlongMOVIE2
Chorus Member
joined:7/23/12


Updated On: 8/20/12 at 09:36 AM
keb2
Stand-by
joined:1/4/12
The two times I saw Ms. Damiano in a show (Next to Normal, Spider-Man), she came out and signed, and so did T.V. Carpio. I guess it's all a matter of luck?
Emmaloucbway
Broadway Star
joined:10/16/11
I've only seen Peter and the Starcatcher once, but Celia Keenan-Bolger came out and signed/took pictures. She was very nice too!!
SingAlongMOVIE2
Chorus Member
joined:7/23/12
Updated On: 8/20/12 at 09:43 AM
JBroadway
Featured Actor
joined:4/6/12
As others were saying, I think a lot of that was bad luck. Hell, when I stagedoored The Addams Family it was a matinee she came out. You're right about Sutton Foster though. She always went out a different door.
SingAlongMOVIE2
Chorus Member
joined:7/23/12
Updated On: 8/20/12 at 09:49 AM
April Saul
Broadway Legend
joined:2/17/06
I think you're over-analyzing here, and that it's a bit more random than all that. Thinking about actresses, I can't remember being blown off by any of the younger ones: Lea Michele, Damiano, Celia, Julia Stiles, have all been friendly and graceful, even when running into them on the street to and from their shows. Even older, more established actresses like Mary-Louise Parker and Nicole Kidman have been lovely to me and my daughter--and at that time, it was really a thrill for her.

Honestly, it is almost impossible for me to remember any of them being rude...although I don't consider not appearing at the door to be inherently rude, as they're human, and may not have the time each and every night to sign.
newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
I've said it before and I'll say it again - people at the stage door just skeeve me out. I've gone to visit friends in shows and seen the loonies they have to put up with when they exit the theatre; strange, lonely people who feel the ticket they may or may not have bought entitles them to buttonhole an actor and engage them in a creepy conversation. The same maladjusted people seem to feel that they have a "relationship" with these actors they watch. It's just not quite right.

On the more harmless side of the argument, you get those screaming tween tourists who seem to feel their theatre-going experience isn't complete if they don't get to touch the actor they just watched, talk to them, get a photo with them, as though they've actually had some sort of significant interaction.

I'm sure there are some actors who love the attention; but there are also those who suspect they're going to see a gun or knife in the crowd, wielded by some unhinged Travis Bickle.

Take the memory of the show home with you; go out with friends and discuss it; but why pretend you have any sort of connection to the actors? How does a scribbled name or a photo of someone you don't know and who doesn't know you make the experience more significant for you?
Wynbish
Broadway Legend
joined:4/27/12
^ Completely agree.

Stagedooring is a perk of live theatre that has really gone out of control, to the point that it is expected of everyone. It's not part of the purchase of the ticket, or else they would rope off sections and charge for each accordingly.

Also, many stage actors are shy. Many probably have somewhere they really just need to be, whether it is a prior commitment or just needing to catch a train/ride.

And I am not saying the OP or anyone in particular is making this judgement, but it is unfair to discredit their two hour performance because of a two minute moment.

Updated On: 7/24/12 at 10:28 AM
SahDu
Leading Actor
joined:3/22/05
I've got to disagree with newintown. By that logic, what's the point of any autographs from anyone in any field? I mean, just because you go see a sports game doesn't mean you have a connection to the players. But receiving celebrity autographs is a pretty standard cultural phenomenon. Granted, most of these actors aren't celebrities per se, but with what the experience of theatre is in the context, I'd consider them pseudo-celebrities. Getting the actors signature is memorabilia. I don't see anything wrong with that.

I'm not the biggest stage door goer, but I get it. And I don't see anything wrong with people wanting an autograph, especially when the actors make themselves accessible. Assuming that someone is going to pull a gun seems way over the top and takes the fear mongering stance everyone in society is dangerous. When have you ever heard of an actor being attacked at a stage door? Sure, you're going to get those overzealous fans or the tweens, but that's a part of the Broadway culture. Of course, signing autographs at the stage door is no requirement, but I don't see the harm in fans taking advantage of actors that are willing to do so.
newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Autograph hounding may be a "pretty standard cultural phenomenon," but it's still utterly meaningless.
SahDu
Leading Actor
joined:3/22/05
Then we must agree to disagree. Just because you don't see the meaning in it doesn't mean that others can't enjoy and participate in the experience.

Just my opinion!
Wynbish
Broadway Legend
joined:4/27/12
It's one thing for people to enjoy it, but if it is not as enjoyable as expected, should they make an opinion on the performer as a person? Or say, "oh they didn't because of this unreasonable excuse I am assuming, and that's not cool"?
Kad
Broadway Legend
joined:11/5/05
Sometimes actors just want to go *home*. Or they have plans, or have friends and family coming to see them.

Once the curtain comes down, the actors aren't obligated to do anything for you.
Wynbish
Broadway Legend
joined:4/27/12
Would people rather they go out the stage door and just keep walking or exit through another door? I would think the latter would be less offensive.
SahDu
Leading Actor
joined:3/22/05
Just want to clarify, I was in no way trying to comment on actors who don't attend the stage door. It's their prerogative. Just was responding to newintown's comments that no one should stage door at any time.
newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Do avoid putting words in others' mouths.
humbugfoto
Broadway Legend
joined:6/16/07
I agree with newintown, too. I have never understood the autograph mania. No one has ever been able to adequately explain to me why getting a person to scribble his name on a piece of paper or a Playbill is so special. You get ten seconds of the actor looking at the piece of paper, concentrating on it and the pen, not you. WHY does that have meaning? If you're going to stagedoor, I'd think it'd be far more special to be able to have that actor's undivided attention and chat with them for ten or fifteen seconds. THAT would be a memory to take home. But a bit of ink on a piece of paper?

I just don't get it.
Sarcasm is an allergic reaction to stupid people.
newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Many people have great difficulty examining their personal totems - an autograph hound will take their Hugh Jackman-signed Playbill home, and believe, deep down, that they actually have a piece of Hugh Jackman with them at all times; this is similar in thought to Dark Age Catholic peasantry stealing the host from church to create personal shrines at home.

But if you consider the nature of the autograph in a non-sentimental, thoughtful light, its inherent lack of true value and meaning is pretty clear. It's merely a piece of paper that has been touched by one's idol.

Updated On: 7/24/12 at 11:24 AM
Rainbowhigh23
Broadway Legend
joined:3/29/12
I believe that the actors truly do not owe you anything besides a performance, but after seeing a great performance, and being in such close proximity to where they are leaving anyway, it's natural for people to get excited at the prospect of a signed playbill, maybe a photo or a hello, a unique memory to take home with you.

And re Rachel Potter at Addams Family, wow - that is the opposite of how she is now. Since Evita started in previews her and Max Von Essen are always the first of the lead actors out the stagedoor who stop and sign. I remember Rachel being very friendly back on March 14 and remembering me a few months later when I saw the show two weeks ago. Most fans who tweet about the Evita stagedoor experience say, "I was able to meet Magaldi and the Mistress no problem but no Ricky Martin."
Dawn Davenport
Stand-by
joined:6/9/05
QUOTE (from humbugfoto:) If you're going to stagedoor, I'd think it'd be far more special to be able to have that actor's undivided attention and chat with them for ten or fifteen seconds. THAT would be a memory to take home. But a bit of ink on a piece of paper?

I just don't get it. END QUOTE

I've been going to the theatre for MANY years (I'm old) and never really thought to even stagedoor. Very few exceptions to that---I asked my aunt to get Tim Curry's autograph outside Amadeus because I was too shy to ask myself (he was very gracious) and my husband was able to get both Daniel Craig's and Hugh Jackman's autographs at the stage door of Steady Rain because I was there for a milestone birthday (I won't say which one!) and wanted that memento to mark that special occasion.

The BEST stagedoor experience I had was not an autograph at all, but a short convo I had with Tom Hewitt outside Jesus Christ Superstar (my sis was there to get autographs, I was standing there with her.) I said to Mr. Hewitt as he was signing my sister's Playbill "I'd like to see you play Sweeney Todd someday" and he looked at me and smiled and said "I was just thinking about learning those songs as a matter of fact!" and I encouraged him to please do it, and he asked my name and we shook hands in greeting. Better than an autograph!!

I think people are getting pretty pushy about EXPECTING actors to stage door. I don't think we are owed that at ALL. We are only owed the best performance they can give us, that counts more than anything else.

Updated On: 7/24/12 at 11:29 AM
SahDu
Leading Actor
joined:3/22/05
@newintown Not putting words in your mouth but doesn't the following imply that people should not stage door? Am I misreading?

"Take the memory of the show home with you; go out with friends and discuss it; but why pretend you have any sort of connection to the actors? How does a scribbled name or a photo of someone you don't know and who doesn't know you make the experience more significant for you?"
Wynbish
Broadway Legend
joined:4/27/12
^ I think that is just saying that people should not put so much value into their stagedoor experience.