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Broadway Review Roundup: BENGAL TIGER AT THE BAGHDAD ZOO

Joe Dziemianowicz, NY Daily News: And despite all the ghosts, "Bengal Tiger" isn't as stirring as it strives to be. It restates a famous 1960s war poster that noted: "War is not healthy for children and other living things." Like soldiers, gardeners and tigers.

Terry Teachout, Wall Street JournalMr. Williams's performance is equally predictable, but it's not his fault, for he's playing the tiger as written: The script calls for a superficial Hollywood-style performance, and he obliges, sounding not unlike Bruce Willis playing the wisecracking baby in "Look Who's Talking." It doesn't help that his one-liners aren't sharp enough, though Mr. Williams does his best to make them snap..."Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo" is still mediocre.

David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter: Williams has not given a performance this subdued in years. He commits to being part of an ensemble, never ramping up into a star turn. There's no comic shtick in his thoughtful Tiger, yet...the ripples of humor are rich and flavorful. This is not a predigestEd Moral treatise that delivers bite-size conclusions, but a provocative and hauntingly surrealistic play from a distinctive voice.

Matt Windman, amNewYork: Staging the play in a large Broadway theater usually reserved for musicals does not work to the play's ultimate advantage. Nevertheless, Rajiv's intelligent drama, as staged by Moisés Kaufman, convincingly captures the chaos of Iraq immediately following the 2003 invasion.

Robert Feldberg, NorthJersey.com: For all of its offbeat perspective, "Bengal Tiger" has a message of agony and frustration that's all too familiar.

Michael Sommers, NJ Newsroom: Depicting the philosophical tiger with grim humor, a gruff-voiced, soulful Williams submerges his bravura skills into the ensemble work of his fellow actors. Respectively playing the conflicted translator and increasingly cerebral Marine, Moayed and Fleischer unerringly chart their characters' evolutions. Titizian suavely portrays the amoral Uday's ghost - who totes his dead brother's head in a plastic bag - with a jaunty ferocity that's scary.

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