BWW Review: Mentalist Scott Silven's WONDERS AT DUSK Combines Illusion With A Bit Of Group Therapy

BWW Review: Mentalist Scott Silven's WONDERS AT DUSK Combines Illusion With A Bit Of Group Therapy
Scott Silven
(Courtesy of McKittrick Hotel)

"Raise your hand if you consider yourself to be a trustworthy person."

Those of a cynical nature might consider that a hapless request to aim at a New York audience, but sincerity is the key to mentalist Scott Silven's WONDERS AT DUSK, playing at the atmospherically dim Club Car at The McKittrick Hotel. Or at least the illusion of sincerity.

The trustworthy volunteer, chosen at the beginning of the show, is asked to safeguard an item that helps provide the kicker finish to his hour-long performance (which actually starts about 45 minutes after the 7pm showtime) that often seems to take the form of a group therapy session, as he asks audience members pointed questions that require searches into their past.

The soft-spoken artist introduces himself by talking about his childhood; his secret place, his prized possession and his dreams of traveling the world. Then he asks everyone present to think of their own secret places and prized possessions, leading into impressive displays of mental communication.

Simple descriptions of each illusion would spoil the fun, but they involve a good deal of audience participation (not always voluntary) and sometimes get so complicated that part of the enjoyment is trying to figure out where he's going.

Low-key and entertaining, WONDERS AT DUSK may not only leave you baffled at Silven's expertise but may also prompt a few discussions of long-forgotten personal memories.

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From This Author Michael Dale

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