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METAMORPHOSES & CONSTABLE Set for June-August at Frist Center, Nashville

Related: Frist Center,
METAMORPHOSES & CONSTABLE Set for June-August at Frist Center, Nashville

It's officially summer come June and this summer season promises to be an active one at the Frist Center. Next month kicks off with the opening of Metamorphoses: Drawings by Erin Anfinson, Kristi Hargrove, Mark Hosford, and Chris Scarborough in the Conte Community Arts Gallery, and is shortly followed by the opening of Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum on June 22. The Frist has collaborated with Watkins College on an quilting workshop with edgy quilter Ben Venom and the second installment of Frist Fridays on June 29th features Sam Bush with special guest Lera Lynn.

JUNE 2012

Friday, June 1 Music at the Frist
6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Lindsay George (jazz vocalist)
Free

With a stunning voice, intense spirit, and honest lyrics, Belmont grad and Nashville Jazz Workshop alumna, Lindsay George has created a jazz pop sound for a new generation of listeners. On her latest project, a pop CD titled "Who Would I Have to Be?" Lindsay embarked on a year-long collaboration with chart topping artist/producer Jamie Slocum. They are a natural songwriting team-Lindsay writing unique, honest, and compelling lyrics, and Slocum bringing a natural talent for composing memorable melodies and innovative arrangements. Slocum brings experience as an artist and writer in almost every genre of music; Lindsay cites the jazz greats, Johnny Mercer and Duke Ellington, for her lyrical inspiration. Lindsay's pop influences come from all generations-the Beatles, to Sixpence None the Richer, to Stevie Wonder, and contemporary indie favorites like the Raveonettes and Band of Horses. Expect to hear these influences woven together when she performs at the Frist.

Friday, June 1 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, June 1 ARTini: Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art 7:00 p.m. of Thornton Dial
Meet at exhibition entrance
Gallery admission required, members admitted free

Join Shaun Giles, educator for outreach at the Frist Center, as he leads an informal conversation about some of the works included in the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial.

Are you curious about art? Do you want to learn more about the content and concepts behind an artist's work? If you answered yes to either of those questions, then the ARTini program is for you! ARTinis are designed for everyone-from the novice to the connoisseur-and include informal and insightful conversations that offer a deeper understanding of one or two works of art in an exhibition.

Saturday, June 2 Architecture Tour of the Frist Center
4:30 p.m.
Meet in the Frist Center's Grand Lobby
Free

Coming downtown to the First Saturday Art Crawl? Then start your evening at the Frist Center, as we've moved our monthly architecture tour to the first Saturday of each month.

"When was the Frist Center built? Who was the architect? Can you tell me about the floors in the galleries?" These are just some of the questions answered in the Frist Center's popular monthly architecture tours. Stroll around the Frist Center as you learn more about our landmark building from one of our always-engaging docents.

Tuesday, June 5 ARTini: Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art 12:00 p.m. of Thornton Dial
Meet at exhibition entrance
Gallery admission required, members admitted free

Join Shaun Giles, educator for outreach at the Frist Center, as he leads an informal conversation about some of the works included in the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial.

Are you curious about art? Do you want to learn more about the content and concepts behind an artist's work? If you answered yes to either of those questions, then the ARTini program is for you! ARTinis are designed for everyone-from the novice to the connoisseur-and include informal and insightful conversations that offer a deeper understanding of one or two works of art in an exhibition.

Thursday, June 7 Curator's Tour: Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and 12:00 p.m. the Art of Thornton Dial
Meet at exhibition entrance
Free; with purchase of gallery admission

Join Mark Scala, chief curator at the Frist Center, for a tour of the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial.

Thursday, June 7 Music at the Frist
6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Meltzer Parsons Guitar Duo
Free

Bryant Meltzer and Michael David Parsons are making their mark in town as songwriters, but during their performances at the Frist Center, they showcase their considerable instrumental talents. Performing original tunes they describe as "instrumental pop," their music features strong melodies and distinctive rhythms in wordless musical "discussions" between their instruments. Michael Parsons plays rhythm guitar, and Bryant Meltzer plays melody lines on mandolin, guitar or flute.

Thursday, June 7 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Thursday, June 7 Artist's Forum featuring Michele Lambert and Michael 6:30 p.m. Catalano
Rechter Room
Free

Artist's Forum is a program in which Nashville-based and regional emerging and recognized artists discuss the thoughts and processes behind their work. Participants are encouraged to come and be part of a dialogue about the artistic process.

This month's Artist's Forum invites artist Michele Lambert and filmmaker Michael Catalano to speak about their artistic processes and concepts, as well as sharing their experiences in artistic collaborations.

Friday, June 8 Exhibitions Open to the Public

? Metamorphoses: Drawings by Erin Anfinson, Kristi Hargrove, Mark Hosford, and Chris Scarborough
o Conte Community Arts Gallery

Friday, June 8 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Fuzzmuzz (ambient electronica)

Free

Fuzzmuzz is an electro-acoustic, ambient artist who took the musical pulses of Miami, New York and LA before settling into the studio in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, to record this first solo release, Fuzzmuzz "One." His music is mesmerizing, poetic and hypnotic with influences as diverse as Pink Floyd, Bill Frisell, Erik Satie and Philip Glass. Winston has a degree in jazz performance from the University of Miami and was a member of the Gabe Dixon Band.

Friday, June 8 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Saturday, June 9 Kids Club: Stencil-a-Story

10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m.

Meet in the upper level foyer

Registration required. Call 615.744.3357 to make your reservation.

Designed for 5–10 year olds, the Frist Center Kids Club offers exciting opportunities for children to discover, explore, and create art. Free membership includes a Kids Club card, rewards for participation, hands-on activities in the Martin ArtQuest Gallery, and monthly projects in the art studios. Featured activity: Create handmade stencils and craft a storytelling artwork! Drawing on the exhibition Connecting Cultures: Children's Stories from Across the World, participants will create stencil imagery and invent a special tale with personal flair.

Sunday, June 10 Frist in the Community:

3:00–5:00 p.m. 27th Purity Miss Martha's Ice Cream

First Presbyterian Church Crankin' and Summer Social

4815 Franklin Road

$10 for adults, $8 for children

Join the Frist Center for the Visual Arts' outreach educators at the 27th Purity Miss Martha's Ice Cream Crankin' and Summer Social at the First Presbyterian Church. While you sample hundreds of gallons of homemade ice cream in dozens of flavors, do a hands-on art activity developed in conjunction with the Frist Center exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial.

Thursday, June 14 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Contrarian Ensemble (early music)

Free

The delightful Contrarian Ensemble performs an eclectic variety of dance music from the 1300s to the present, including traditional tunes from the U.S., the British Isles and Europe, as well as original compositions. The group often performs reels, jigs, and waltzes for contra dances in the region. Dancing is welcome and encouraged!

The Contrarian Ensemble will become regular monthly players for Music at the Frist throughout 2012, with performances scheduled for the third Thursday of each month.

Thursday, June 14 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Thursday, June 14 Artist's Perspective: Ben Venom "Heavy Quilting"

6:30 p.m.

Frist Center Auditorium

Free; seating is first come, first seated

In this lecture, San Francisco-based artist Ben Venom will discuss his interest in juxtaposing traditional handmade crafts with one of the more extreme musical genres, heavy metal. His work can be described as a collision of Iron Maiden metal ballads with the outrageous stage antics of Ozzy Osbourne. His work is serious, yet attempts to take on a B-movie horror film style, where even the beasts of metal need a warm blanket to sleep with.

Friday, June 15 Don't Be Square: Adult Studio Series-A Two-Part and Saturday, June 16 Workshop at Watkins College of Art, Design and Film

10:00 a.m.–4:00p.m. Guest Artist: Ben Venom

$120 per participant. Cost includes gallery admission, parking, lunch during both sessions, and some materials. Participants must provide their own sewing machine, T-shirts, and fabrics.

Registration opens on April 1 through the following link: http://www.watkins.edu/community or participants may call 615.277.7455.

Join San Francisco-based artist Ben Venom for a two-day workshop exploring quilt design and construction and challenging the concept that quilting is only the domain of folk art. The workshop will begin at the Frist Center with a tour of the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial followed by lunch. In the afternoon, and the following day, the program will continue at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film where participants will create an individually designed small quilting square from their own worn out T-shirt of found fabric. The workshops will cover appliqué, basting, and quilt construction. No prior experience with quilting is required.

Presented in collaboration with Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

Workshop One

Friday, June 15

• Introduction to class

• Tour Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial in the Frist Center

• Draw out designs for templates

• Cut tees / fabric to size

• Machine sew design together

Workshop Two

Saturday, June 16

• Safety pin / Baste fabric in preparation for quilting

• Design Quilting pattern

• Studio time / troubleshooting

Suggested Reading: Dare to Be Square Quilting: A Block-by-Block Guide to Making Patchwork and Quilts by Boo Davis

Friday, June 15 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Lindsay George (jazz vocalist)

Free

With a stunning voice, intense spirit, and honest lyrics, Belmont grad and Nashville Jazz Workshop alumna, Lindsay George has created a jazz pop sound for a new generation of listeners. On her latest project, a pop CD titled "Who Would I Have to Be?" Lindsay embarked on a year-long collaboration with chart topping artist/producer Jamie Slocum. They are a natural songwriting team-Lindsay writing unique, honest, and compelling lyrics, and Slocum bringing a natural talent for composing memorable melodies and innovative arrangements. Slocum brings experience as an artist and writer in almost every genre of music; Lindsay cites the jazz greats, Johnny Mercer and Duke Ellington, for her lyrical inspiration. Lindsay's pop influences come from all generations-the Beatles, to Sixpence None the Richer, to Stevie Wonder, and contemporary indie favorites like the Raveonettes and Band of Horses. Expect to hear these influences woven together when she performs at the Frist.

Friday, June 15 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, June 15 Film: Manufactured Landscapes

7:00 p.m.

Frist Center Auditorium

Free; seating is first come, first seated

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky is fascinated by the subject of the topographical landscape as it has been irrevocably altered by industries that feed the world's appetite for material goods. Edward Burtynsky: The Industrial Sublime on view in the Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery from June 25 through September 3, 2012, presents the beauty and evidence of destruction in landscapes that have been altered by human industry, exploring the tensions between aesthetics, economics, and environmentalism.

About the film:

Manufactured Landscapes is a documentary on the world and work of Edward Burtynsky. Internationally acclaimed for his large-scale photographs of "Manufactured Landscapes"-quarries, recycling yards, factories, mines, and dams-Burtynsky creates stunningly beautiful art from civilization's materials and debris. With breathtaking sequences, such as the opening tracking shot through an almost endless factory, the filmmakers also extend the narratives of Burtynsky's photographs, allowing us to meditate on our impact on the planet and witness both the epicenters of industrial endeavor and the dumping grounds of its waste. The film powerfully shifts our consciousness about the world and the way we live in it, without simplistic judgments or reductive resolutions. Directed by Jennifer Baichwal, 2006. 90 minutes. 35mm. Unrated.

Sunday, June 17 Artful Tales: "The River that Gave Gifts"

2:00– 3:00 p.m.

Frist Center Auditorium/Studios

Free

Join in a story about sharing creativity and the spirit of community. Afterwards, collaborate with family and friends to create an artwork connected to the tradition of quiltmaking. This program complements the Frist Center's current exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial.

Artful Tales is a monthly interactive family program that combines the oral tradition of storytelling with hands-on, art-making activities to explore stories and cultures from around the world. This program is part of the Connecting Cultures: Children's Stories from Across the World exhibition and is funded in part by the Nissan Foundation and Publix Super Markets Charities.

Monday, June 18 Senior Monday

10:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

The Frist Center for the Visual Arts and WAMB-AM present Senior Mondays, a series of events for those who admit their "senior" status. On these days, gallery admission is $5.00 (1/2 price of regular admission) for seniors and there is a special senior parking fee of $2.00 in the Frist Center lots as long as spaces are available. Seniors receive a 15 percent discount on Frist Center Gift Shop purchases and on Frist Center Café refreshments purchased throughout the day. Seniors are invited to enjoy a live radio broadcast by WAMB's Harry Stephenson in the Grand Lobby and live music provided by Snappy Pappy from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Special gallery talks and other activities are scheduled throughout the day.

Thursday, June 21 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Geary Moore (jazz guitarist)

Free

An accomplished composer, as well as master technician, Geary Moore has performed with a "Who's Who" of music masters, including George Benson, Jimmy Ponder, Arthur Prysock, David "Fat Head" Newman, Ruth Brown, Jimmy McGriff, Bootsie Barnes and T.S. Monk.

Thursday, June 21 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, June 22 Exhibition Opens to the Public

? Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum
o Upper-Level Galleries

Friday, June 22 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Fuzzmuzz (ambient electronica)

Free

Fuzzmuzz is an electro-acoustic, ambient artist who took the musical pulses of Miami, New York and LA before settling into the studio in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, to record this first solo release, Fuzzmuzz "One." His music is mesmerizing, poetic and hypnotic with influences as diverse as Pink Floyd, Bill Frisell, Erik Satie and Philip Glass. Winston has a degree in jazz performance from the University of Miami and was a member of the Gabe Dixon Band.

Friday, June 22 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, June 22 Curator's Perspective: "A Conservative Revolutionary: John Constable and Art History"

6:30 p.m. 

Frist Center Auditorium presented by Dr. Mark Evans, senior curator of Free; seating is first come, first seated paintings at the Victoria and Albert Museum Dr. Mark Evans, senior curator of paintings at the Victoria and Albert Museum will contrast John Constable's ideas on the history of landscape painting, as revealed by lectures he gave in 1833 and 1836, with critics' shocked responses to his apparent lack of finish and disregard for formal decorum. Dr. Evans surveys Constable's posthumous international celebrity as a precursor of the Impressionists, or even a prophet of photography (the daguerreotype was invented two years after his death). Ironically, reverence for the old masters seems to have furnished the mainspring of Constable's own revolutionary break with the conventions of past art.

Thursday, June 28 Music at the Frist

6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Mean Mary (multi-instrumentalist, folk vocalist)

Free

'Mean Mary' James, a Florida native now based in Nashville, began life as a musical prodigy-could read music before she could read words and co-wrote songs at age five. By age seven she was proficient on the guitar, banjo, & violin, and entertained audiences with regular appearances on television and in live performances at venues across the US with her vocal and instrumental skills. Her fascinating life has been one long road show interspersed with TV, radio, and film. She has performed more than 500 live TV shows and over 4,000 road shows-including national festivals, fairs, cruises, colleges, theatres, clubs and house concerts.

Thursday, June 28 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, June 29 Frist Fridays Concert Series:

6:00–9:00 p.m. Sam Bush with special guest Lera Lynn

Turner Courtyard

General admission: $10 adults
Admission for Members and youth 18 and younger is FREE.

The second installment of the Frist Center for the Visual Arts' four-part Frist Fridays summer concert series features Grammy Award winning multi-instrumentalist Sam Bush with special guest Lera Lynn. The series takes place in the Frist Center's Turner Courtyard on the final Friday of each month, May through August, from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. Patrons are invited to enjoy an evening of live music, light snacks and beverages, as well as the diverse exhibitions on view in the Frist Center's galleries. Frist Fridays take place rain or shine.

Sam Bush is not old enough to be a musical legend, but he is. Called the King of Telluride and the King of Newgrass, Bush has been honored by the Americana Music Association and the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Mandolin player extraordinaire, three-time national junior fiddle champion, Grammy-winning vocalist and co-founder of the seminal Newgrass Revival band, Bush has had a major hand in altering the landscape of American music and influenced at least a couple of generations of instrumentalists in the meantime. Newgrass Revival, with its amalgamation of bluegrass, jazz, rock, reggae and blues, continues to live large in the minds and hearts of fans of progressive bluegrass the world over. Sam Bush has played with a staggering array of artists, including Emmylou Harris, Doc Watson, Garth Brooks, Bela Fleck, Charlie Haden and Lyle Lovett, Del McCoury and Edgar Meyer, to name only a few.

At Frist Friday, he will be joined by up-and-coming Americana singer and award-winning songwriter Lera Lynn who, in 2011, won the Christ Austin Songwriting Competition held at Merlefest.

Friday, June 29 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

 

JULY 2012

Thursday, July 5 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Ryan Coleman (singer-songwriter)

Free

Regular Music at the Frist visitors will recognize Ryan from his appearances with the popular Kristen Hubbard Jazz Trio. Tonight, Ryan will showcase his solo talents as a singer songwriter.

Ryan Coleman is a 30-something American singer/songwriter from Murfreesboro,Tenn. A life on the road comes naturally to him, considering his childhood as a military brat. After graduating high school in Pelham, Ala., he moved to Murfreesboro to pursue a career in music. In the intervening years he has toured with acclaimed artists, played endless dives, and even briefly road managed a troupe of wrestlers. These experiences have proven to be fertile material for his songs.

Thursday, July 5 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, July 6 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. The Thank You Ma'ams

Free

With stunning three part harmonies and precise instrumentation, The Thank You Ma'ams offer an alt-folk sound drawing on diverse influences from Crosby, Stills and Nash to the Avett Brothers. Whether on the somber track Jubilee or the riotous foot-stomper Last Week, the trio brings the incomparable energy and enthusiasm that has made their shows popular throughout Middle Tennessee and the South.

Friday, July 6 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, July 6 ARTini: Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and 7:00 p.m. Albert Museum

Meet at exhibition entrance

Gallery admission required, members admitted free

Join Kim Jameson, educator for public programs at the Frist Center, as she leads an informal conversation about some of the works included in the exhibition Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Are you curious about art? Do you want to learn more about the content and concepts behind an artist's work? If you answered yes to either of those questions, then the ARTini program is for you! ARTinis are designed for everyone-from the novice to the connoisseur-and include informal and insightful conversations that offer a deeper understanding of one or two works of art in an exhibition.

Saturday, July 7 Architecture Tour of the Frist Center

4:30 p.m.

Meet in the Frist Center's Grand Lobby

Free

Coming downtown to the First Saturday Art Crawl? Then start your evening at the Frist Center, as we've moved our monthly architecture tour to the first Saturday of each month.

"When was the Frist Center built? Who was the architect? Can you tell me about the floors in the galleries?" These are just some of the questions answered in the Frist Center's popular monthly architecture tours. Stroll around the Frist Center as you learn more about our landmark building from one of our always-engaging docents.

Tuesday, July 10 ARTini: Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and 12:00 p.m. Albert Museum

Meet at exhibition entrance

Gallery admission required, members admitted free

Join Kim Jameson, educator for public programs at the Frist Center, as she leads an informal conversation about some of the works included in the exhibition Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum

Are you curious about art? Do you want to learn more about the content and concepts behind an artist's work? If you answered yes to either of those questions, then the ARTini program is for you! ARTinis are designed for everyone-from the novice to the connoisseur-and include informal and insightful conversations that offer a deeper understanding of one or two works of art in an exhibition.

Thursday, July 12 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Beady (Americana)

Free

This is the first of two consecutive nights Beady will appear at Music at the Frist.

This five-member Louisville-based band got together in 2009. Influenced by Bruce Cockburn, the Avett Brothers and Alison Krauss, they also listened and have been influenced by homeless street musicians playing blues guitar. Their instrumental talents include guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, cello, trumpet, trombone and, of course, vocals. The result is well-crafted modern songs that sound traditional, well worn and wise.

Thursday, July 12 Artist's Forum featuring Erin Anfinson, Mark Hosford, 6:30 p.m. and Kristi Hargrove

Rechter Room

Free

Artist's Forum is a program in which Nashville-based and regional emerging and recognized artists discuss the thoughts and processes behind their work. Participants are encouraged to come and be part of a dialogue about the artistic process.

This month's Artist's Forum invites artists Erin Anfinson, Mark Hosford, and Kristi Hargrove to speak about the artistic processes and concepts of their artworks represented in the Frist Center's exhibition,Metamorphoses: Drawings by Erin Anfinson, Kristi Hargrove, Mark Hosford, and Chris Scarborough.

Thursday, July 12 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, July 13 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Beady

Free

This five-member Louisville-based band got together in 2009. Influenced by Bruce Cockburn, the Avett Brothers and Alison Krauss, they also listened and have been influenced by homeless street musicians playing blues guitar. Their instrumental talents include guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, cello, trumpet, trombone and, of course, vocals. The result is well-crafted modern songs that sound traditional, well worn and wise.

Friday, July 13 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Saturday, July 14 Connecting Disciplines: "Burtynsky's Cinematic

11:00 a.m. Landscapes" featuring Jennifer Fay, Ph.D., director of Meet at exhibition entrance film studies, associate professor of film studies and Free; with purchase of gallery admission English, Vanderbilt University

Jennifer Fay, PhD., director of films studies and associate professor of film studies and English at Vanderbilt University, will explore two paradoxes she believes confronts audiences through Edward Burtynsky's photographs. Focusing on both the estranging perspective and implied movement in these images, this gallery talk reflects on this exhibit in relation to cinema as both a time-based photographic medium and as a potentially defamiliarizing experience of duration and change.

Saturday, July 14 Kids Club: Quilting Abstraction

10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m.

Meet in the upper level foyer

Registration required. Call 615.744.3357 to make your reservation.

Designed for 5–10 year olds, the Frist Center Kids Club offers exciting opportunities for children to discover, explore, and create art. Free membership includes a Kids Club card, rewards for participation, hands-on activities in the Martin ArtQuest Gallery, and monthly projects in the art studios. Featured activity: Try your hand at a mixed media weaving project. Inspired by the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial, participants will use decorative paper, fabric, ribbon, and paint to explore how pattern, color, and shape are related to quilt-making.

Sunday, July 15 Artful Tales: "The Woman who ate all the Cakes"

2:00– 3:00 p.m.

Frist Center Auditorium/Studios

Free

Enjoy the classic retelling of this Just-so story about simplicity, sharing, and how a certain little bird came to be. Afterwards, join other families for a group art-making project that turns individual squiggles and doodles into a magnificent and colorful creation. You'll be amazed at what your finished artwork looks like!

Artful Tales is a monthly interactive family program that combines the oral tradition of storytelling with hands-on, art-making activities to explore stories and cultures from around the world.

Monday, July 16 Senior Monday

10:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

The Frist Center for the Visual Arts and WAMB-AM present Senior Mondays, a series of events for those who admit their "senior" status. On these days, gallery admission is $5.00 (1/2 price of regular admission) for seniors and there is a special senior parking fee of $2.00 in the Frist Center lots as long as spaces are available. Seniors receive a 15 percent discount on Frist Center Gift Shop purchases and on Frist Center Café refreshments purchased throughout the day. Seniors are invited to enjoy a live radio broadcast by WAMB's Harry Stephenson in the Grand Lobby and live music provided by Snappy Pappy from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Special gallery talks and other activities are scheduled throughout the day.

Thursday, July 19 Curator's Tour: Constable: Oil Sketches from the 12:00 p.m. Victoria and Albert Museum

Meet at exhibition entrance

Free; with purchase of gallery admission

Join Frist Center Curator Trinita Kennedy as she explores the role of the oil sketch in the artistic practice of John Constable (1776–1837) and discover why he is viewed as one of the great innovators in British landscape painting.

Thursday, July 19 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Contrarian Ensemble (early music)

Free

The delightful Contrarian Ensemble performs an eclectic variety of dance music from the 1300s to the present, including traditional tunes from the U.S., the British Isles and Europe, as well as original compositions. The group often performs reels, jigs, and waltzes for contra dances in the region. Dancing is welcome and encouraged!

The Contrarian Ensemble is scheduled to perform the third Thursday each month through 2012.

Thursday, July 19 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, July 20 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. TBD

Free

Friday, July 20 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday July 20 Film Screening: Waste Land

7:00 p.m.

Frist Center Auditorium

Free; seating is first come, first seated

Both Edward Burtynsky: The Industrial Sublime, on view in the Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012, and Constable: Oil Sketches from the Victoria and Albert Museum, on view in the Upper-Level Galleries from June 22 through September 30, 2012, explore the natural world. Edward Burtynsky's (b. 1955) work depicts modern landscapes that have been irrevocably altered by industries that feed the world's appetite for material goods, while John Constable's (1776–1837) oil sketches reflect his study of transient atmospheric effects, emblematic of one of the great innovators of British landscape painting. The documentary films that support these exhibitions examine various subjects related to the natural world and offer varying perspectives of the planet that we inhabit.

About the film:

This documentary of artist Vik Muniz's journey from his home in Brooklyn to his native Brazil highlights the transformative power of art and the beauty of the human spirit. Vik Muniz collaborates with the brilliantcatadores, pickers of recyclable materials, who live and work in the garbage. The artist takes us on an emotional journey from Jardim Gramacho, the world's largest landfill on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro, to the heights of international art stardom. Directed by Lucy Walker, Karen Harley, and João Jardim, 2010. 99 minutes. Unrated. Nominated for a 2011 Oscar® for Best Documentary Feature.

Saturday, July 21 Travel: Day Trip to The National Quilt Museum,

8:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. Paducah, Kentucky

$20 members/$40 non-members

Cost includes bus travel, admission to The National Quilt Museum, lecture, and guided tour

Cost does not include lunch and admission into nearby museums

Space is limited; advanced registration required

Call 615.744.3355

Registration and payment must be received by Friday, July 6

This is an opportunity to visit a museum dedicated to presenting quilts that honor the history of the craft while embracing the contemporary. Your experience will include a curatorial presentation with Judy Schwender, curator of collection and a guided tour of the exhibits, The Exquisite Stitch: 200 Years of Hand Quilting and Blending the Old and the New: Quilts by Paul D. Pilgrim. After the museum tour, you may continue to tour the museum on your own, enjoy a leisurely lunch at any of the local eateries, visit any of the six surrounding museums, or spend time shopping in the numerous galleries and craft shops found downtown. Your registration packet will include information to assist in planning.

This program is being held in conjunction with the exhibition Creation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial on view in the Frist Center's Ingram Gallery from May 25 to September 3, 2012, whichexplores parallels and intersections in the works of these acclaimed Alabama artists.

Thursday, July 26 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Lindsay George (jazz vocalist)

Free

With a stunning voice, intense spirit, and honest lyrics, Belmont grad and Nashville Jazz Workshop alumna, Lindsay George has created a jazz pop sound for a new generation of listeners. On her latest project, a pop CD titled "Who Would I Have to Be?" Lindsay embarked on a year-long collaboration with chart topping artist/producer Jamie Slocum. They are a natural songwriting team-Lindsay writing unique, honest, and compelling lyrics, and Slocum bringing a natural talent for composing memorable melodies and innovative arrangements. Slocum brings experience as an artist and writer in almost every genre of music; Lindsay cites the jazz greats, Johnny Mercer and Duke Ellington, for her lyrical inspiration. Lindsay's pop influences come from all generations-the Beatles, to Sixpence None the Richer, to Stevie Wonder, and contemporary indie favorites like the Raveonettes and Band of Horses. Expect to hear these influences woven together when she performs at the Frist.

Thursday, July 26 Art-Making in the Lobby: The Simple Life

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from June 1 through July 27, 2012, visitors are invited to create cardboard drawings in the Grand Lobby using the modest materials of artist Bill Traylor and inspiration from the exhibition Bill Traylor: Drawings from the Collections of the High Museum of Art and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Born into slavery, artist Bill Traylor moved to Montgomery, Alabama, around 1928 where he began drawing at the age of 82. Most of his works were composed with limited materials like found cardboard, pencils and poster paint to portray his own life experiences and observations. Traylor's ability to create such moving artwork from simple geometric shapes and the few materials that were available to him is what solidified his place among some of the most respected American artists from the twentieth century. Following in Traylor's footsteps, visitors will be using colored pencils and charcoal on cardboard to create their own piece of artwork reflecting their life experiences. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Thursday, July 26 Audience Focus

6:30 p.m.

Rechter Room

Free; registration required

Call 615.744.3999

Join Educator for Public Programs Kim Jameson for a conversation about public programs at the Frist Center. What programs do you enjoy? What programs would you like to see more often on our schedule? What programs would you like to see less often on our schedule? This is an opportunity to share your views to help inform future programming at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.

Friday, July 27 Panel Discussion: "Managing Landscapes"

12:00 p.m. Panelists: Leigh Ann Baird, vice president of

Frist Center Auditorium strategic planning and sustainability, Ingram Barge Free; seating is first come, first seated Company; Gina Hancock, state director for the Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy;

Simon Amstutz, AONB manager for Dedham Vale and Stour Valley Project, UK; Simon Peachey, senior visitor services assistant, andDave Piper, area ranger for the National Trust, UK

Moderator: Jim Schorr, adjunct professor of management, Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University

The British government designated the homestead region of England's finest landscape painter, John Constable, as an "Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty" (AONB), ensuring that the legacy and beauty of the Stour River Valley landscape, featured heavily in his paintings, remains intact for future generations. How does this artistic impetus for land conservation compare to methods and motivations for protecting Tennessee's lands and waters? This distinguished panel brings together conservation specialists from Tennessee and the Stour River Valley in England to explore the importance of preserving landscapes. How does one choose what to protect? What does it take to manage and sustain a landscape or river system? How can industry and the natural environment thrive in harmony, and what are the similarities and differences in the way in which England has conserved Constable Country and how we conserve in Tennessee? This promises to be a lively discussion. Come and join the conversation.

Friday, July 27 Frist Fridays Concert Series:

6:00–9:00 p.m. Band of Heathens

Turner Courtyard

General admission: $10 adults
Admission for Members and youth 18 and younger is FREE.

Frist Fridays, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts' popular summer concert series, continues its 2012 four-concert season on July 27 with Austin-based Band of Heathens in the Turner Courtyard. The series takes place May through August from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. on the final Friday of each month. Patrons are invited to enjoy an evening of live music, light snacks and beverages, as well as the diverse exhibitions on view in the Frist Center's galleries. Frist Fridays take place rain or shine.

Since emerging as an important new live band from Austin, the Band of Heathens has toured relentlessly with their epic live shows and built a devoted following that has landed them on some of the finest stages in music, including Bonnaroo, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Lollapalooza and the Austin City Limits television show and the Austin City Limits Festival.

The Dallas Morning News calls theirs a "must-see show." Maverick Magazine simply described them as "terrific," and The New York Times reviewed one of their shows as "hungry, unflagging and lean."

Their most recent album, "Top Hat Crown & The Clapmaster's Son," has been lauded for demonstrating artistic stretch and growth while maintaining the band's integrity. In a crowded field of roots rockers, the Pittsburgh Daily News dubbed the effort "truly memorable," and American Songwriter described it as "an album that begs to be listened to from start to finish."

 

Thursday, August 2 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Prattle On, Rick (Americana)

Free

Prattle On, Rick's elusively soothing vocals take listeners on an awe-inspiring exploration leaving one feeling content and invigorated. There is deliverance to be found in Patrick Rickelton's music, a salvation that is palpable and delivered honestly and truthfully, so that when Rickelton sings, one believes every word. Visitors may visit the galleries (free to members), shop in the gift shop and listen to some of Nashville's finest local music while relaxing in our bistro seating area and enjoying a variety of wines and other beverages from the café.

Thursday, August 2 Art-Making in the Lobby: Quirky Quilting

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from August 1 through August 31, 2012, visitors can try their hand at a mixed media quilting project in the Grand Lobby using various materials and inspiration from the exhibitionCreation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Quilts made by the women of Gee's Bend, a small rural community southwest of Selma, Ala., feature a sophisticated orchestration of color and eccentric quasi-geometric shapes composing what the New York Times has said are "some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced." Inspired by the Gee's Bend exhibition, participants will use decorative paper, fabric, ribbon and paint to explore how pattern, color and shape are related to quiltmaking. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday August 3 Music at the Frist

6:00–8:00 p.m. Kristen Hubbard Jazz Trio

Free

The Kristen Hubbard Jazz Trio's musical goal is to do something familiar…but different. Guitarist Sam Frazee uses a nylon-string classical guitar for the chordal duties, which echoes his love for Latin and Spanish music. Bassist Ryan Coleman uses a fretless electric bass with upright strings to create a unique blend of sounds for the walking bass lines. Both complement Kristen Hubbard, whose timeless voice and crisp delivery offer listeners a treat: classic jazz standards reinvented in the true spirit of jazz.

Friday, August 3 Art-Making in the Lobby: Quirky Quilting

6:00–8:00 p.m.

Free

Thursday and Friday evenings from August 1 through August 31, 2012, visitors can try their hand at a mixed media quilting project in the Grand Lobby using various materials and inspiration from the exhibitionCreation Story: Gee's Bend Quilts and the Art of Thornton Dial, on view in the Ingram Gallery from May 25 through September 3, 2012.

Quilts made by the women of Gee's Bend, a small rural community southwest of Selma, Ala., feature a sophisticated orchestration of color and eccentric quasi-geometric shapes composing what the New York Times has said are "some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced." Inspired by the Gee's Bend exhibition, participants will use decorative paper, fabric, ribbon and paint to explore how pattern, color and shape are related to quiltmaking. This art-making activity in the Grand Lobby is free and open to all visitors.

Friday, August 3 ARTini: Edward Burtynsky: The Industrial Sublime

7:00 p.m.

Meet at exhibition entrance

Gallery admission required; members free

Are you curious about art? Do you want to learn more about the content and concepts behind an artist's work? If you answered yes to either of those questions, then the ARTini program is for you! ARTinis are designed for everyone-from the novice to the connoisseur-and include informal and insightful conversations t

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