Inaugural Magazine Grands Prix Fellow Announced

Inaugural Magazine Grands Prix Fellow Announced

TORONTO, ON - The Canadian Magazine Awards / Grands prix du magazine are delighted to announce that the inaugural Magazine Grands Prix Fellow is Laura Stewart.

"When we announced the Magazine Grands Prix last fall, we envisioned much more than just an awards gala: we also launched a new fellowship program to invest in the future of our sector," said Douglas Knight, Chair of Magazines Canada. "The Magazine Grands Prix Fellowship program matches emerging talent with Canadian host magazines; each year, we will choose a theme that speaks to an issue of central importance to our national dialogue. The theme for 2017 is Indigenous issues."

Every year, Magazine Grands Prix Fellows will have the opportunity to choose their host magazine from eligible expressions of interest. Stewart has elected to work at Briarpatch, an esteemed publication based in Regina, Saskatchewan, committed to journalism and critical commentary.

"Briarpatch is thrilled to be hosting Laura Stewart's fellowship this summer. Laura's vivacious reporting will bring to life the effects of climate change on the economic and sociopolitical futures of Saskatchewan communities in relation to labour, the oil and gas industry, and treaty relationships on Indigenous land," said Tanya Andrusieczko, Editor of Briarpatch.

"We are additionally thrilled that Laura will be bringing her creative energy to the magazine's in-house editorial and publishing work. As a small magazine with a staff of two, we hope to offer Laura an opportunity to work on all of the facets of magazine publishing, from reviewing queries to working with advertisers and participating in design and production. Laura's energy for magazine writing and editing bodes well for the future of magazines in Canada."

Laura Stewart studies journalism at Mount Royal University in Calgary, and steers most of her reporting assignments toward environment and climate change. She is known for her ambitious coverage of complex issues such as Alberta's new carbon tax, electrical market reforms and Calgary's flood protection challenges under an uncertain climate future.

Raised in Saskatchewan, she has studied farmers' adoption of organic practices, contributed to third-party environmental reviews of oilfield projects and volunteered in prairie conservation organizations. Seeing a wide gap between scientific and everyday conversations on the environment, she returned to university to explore better ways to communicate across this divide.

<

What Do You Think? Tell Us In The Comments!