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Young Broadway actresses too cool for stage door?

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BrodyFosse123
Broadway Legend
joined:2/27/06
In the almost 40 years of seeing shows on Broadway (I started in 1972 at the age of 7), I have NEVER waited at a stage door to obtain a photo or autograph from any performer.

I still remember being annoyed by my dad when we were exiting Sardi's on W. 44th Street (it was 1978 and I was 13 years old) and Bob Fosse was with his daughter Nicole outside of the Broadhurst Theatre where his show DANCIN' was playing and my dad said I should cross the street and get his autograph. I snapped back "what on EARTH am I going to do with his autograph?!" and went on a rampant about how pointless all of that is: taking a photo, etc. with a total stranger, etc.

Even as a kid I was aware how mundane taking a photo or getting an autograph with/from a performer/celebrity/etc was.
So what does that make you, Brody? A zero-trick pony? - Wanna Be A Foster .........................The only power brody wields is in his own mind, joe. But it's amusing to watch him pretend nonetheless. - tazber
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followspot
Broadway Star
joined:12/27/11
This thread makes me want to [NAME REMOVED].
"Tracy... Hold Mama's waffles."
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dramamama611
Broadway Legend
joined:12/4/07
Brody...its mundane to you.(and me, if truth be told) To others it brings great joy. The only time I 'care' about stagedooring is when those (like a bunch in this thread) believe it is their right to get time with the actors, or those that judge the actors that choose not to stage door -- whether it is at all, or just on the eveninng they are there.

I also think there is a difference between stage dooring for a paricular actor whose work you admire, and those that stagedoor as sport or as an every show activity.


As I've mentioned earlier: my 15 year old loves it; My 11 year old waits with me across the street until she is done.
If we're not having fun, then why are we doing it? These are DISCUSSION boards, not mutual admiration boards. Discussion only occurs when we are willing to hear what others are thinking, regardless of whether it is alignment to our own thoughts.
fiesta1
Stand-by
joined:11/20/03
I very rarely stage door (3x in the past decade). In all three times I did not want anything to get signed. I just wanted to tell the performer that I truly liked them in this show, and also mentioned other performances that also were memorable (generally off-Bway).

In these cases, I did not speak to the 'stars', but to other actors who I thought would appreciate kudos from someone who was not shoving a pen/playbill their way.
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My Oh My
Broadway Legend
joined:6/29/07
Some people genuinely look up to and highly admire a musical and its cast. I happily categorize myself as, not just a fan, but a *passionate* fan of musical theatre. The musicals I count as my favorites have both deeply touched and inspired me since childhood and I'd even go as far as saying they are so deeply embedded in my mind, they have had to shape a part of me. I think it's important to distinguish the casual theatre-goer that frequently posts on BWW and the fan who's greatly fascinated by every last aspect of live theatre. Those people that they patiently wait for at the stagedoor are their heros and while they may not be celebrities in the mainstream, the mainstream doesn't dictate to a passionate fan who or who is not a celebrity; it is dictated by their love for the art form.

I stopped stagedooring in my late teens for no other reason other than a desire to avoid crowds. I've been meaning to do it again sometime but I always decide against it. Then again, times have changed and where I used to feel a little awkward for being the only one waiting for an actor or actors/creative team nobody cares about, nowadays I'd feel uncomfortable since safety is now something constantly on everyone's mind. I can't believe things used to be so relaxed back in the day, the sis and I thought nothing of calling out to Jennifer Paz after a performance of Miss Saigon in L.A. and asking for her autograph. She was very gracious and as sweet as ever. Nowadays, she'd likely keep on walking. It was close to 11 p.m. in downtown Los Angeles, which is a ghost town at that hour, and she was all alone walking across the street. Even back then, she probably stopped only because my sis was with me. I doubt she'd have stopped for a lone dude, even if I'm the type who can't harm a fly, hehe.

Not saying there's really anything wrong with it. More power to the bold fan who isn't ashamed of waiting out there after everyone has gone home. Kudos to the fan who isn't swayed by odd looks and awkward interactions with people who deep inside are concerned about their safety, are in a rush to get home to rest before the evening performance, or simply want to go to bed.

What has changed between the teenaged fan and the grown-up me of today is I'm much more mindful and considerate and would rather admire from afar. That's purely personal and not in any way suggesting anyone who stagedoors to be inconsiderate and rude. And I'm sure many actors genuinely love meeting fans at the stage door. It's like clapping at the end of a song; the choice is individual and in no way indicative of manners or lack thereof.
Recreation of original John Cameron orchestration to "On My Own" by yours truly. Click player below to hear.
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dramamama611
Broadway Legend
joined:12/4/07
I think you nailed part of the problem. HERO. What is heroic about a broadway actor? (And you can fill in many professions that are now hailed as heroes -- Athletes, actors, chefs, blah, blah, blah.)

There are actors whose WORK I am in awe of, or a creative team that inspires me -- but those things are not heroic. We have a warped sense of that in this country.
If we're not having fun, then why are we doing it? These are DISCUSSION boards, not mutual admiration boards. Discussion only occurs when we are willing to hear what others are thinking, regardless of whether it is alignment to our own thoughts.
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Kelly2
Broadway Legend
joined:1/5/07
I used to stage door when I was 16, but what is cute as a young teenager quickly becomes creepy and sad when you reach the age that you're expected to have your own life, interests, etc. that are not dependent on what some ensemble member in Spring Awakening thinks of you.

The deep psychosis and self-esteem issues that often accompany these people should be studied by someone. They would be laughable if they weren't so scary. Most Broadway actors, non-stunt-cast ones, do not live lives of fame and glamour. I can think of someone who is a lead in a very big show right now who has to commute home to New Jersey via bus every night and rarely signs autographs because he wants to make the earlier bus home. Is that rude? Is he blowing off his fans? No.

An actor's job is to perform and to give their best onstage every night. As long as they have done that, that's all your ticket entitles you to and if you choose to hang out and greedily demand someone's time, then you lose the right to complain if they don't want to give it to you.
"Get mad, then get over it." - Colin Powell
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Phillytheatreguy10
Leading Actor
joined:7/22/12
I never stated it's the public's right to get the actor's free time, and "opportunity" may have been the wrong word, however for any performer in musical theatre broadway is probably the ultimate goal if you asked them. I was just suggesting they could make evn more memories meeting fans, with who out, they would be jobless. That's all, it's not a right.
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Playbilly
Broadway Legend
joined:3/30/12
All of these mind readers and psychologists who know the hidden motives of others who enjoy waiting for an autograph from someone they admire. Maybe it's because...they enjoy getting an autograph from someone they admire.
"Through The Sacrifice You Made, We Can't Believe The Price You Paid..For Love!"
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
Well, that's certainly thoughtful and deep.
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
...and yet more likely than all the other supposition I've seen here.
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
If likely = reductive, then definitely.
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HogansHero
Featured Actor
joined:2/26/12
I'm not going to read through this entire thread before I respond, but I would question the premise. Do you think these young actresses are escaping the theatre via a helicopter on the roof? Some folks leave quickly; some take their time. Some have guests back often; others never do. At some point, I guarantee you these folks are leaving the building, and with very few exceptions, there are no secret exits. Beyond that, yes there are those who play this ridiculous autograph game, and those who blow past autograph seekers. Some are very much repulsed by it, which is not a function of being cool, and some young actresses are probably creeped out by it for a variety of reasons. But there is no grand plot going on here.
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
"If likely = reductive, then definitely."

The simplest answer is almost always the most likely.
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
If simple = reductive, no problem.
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
Take it up with your therapist. You're over-thinking this.
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dramamama611
Broadway Legend
joined:12/4/07
The ultimate goal for MOST actors is:
1. Have a paying job, consistently
2. Have a leading role

NOT to be famous or be hounded by fans. (I'm sure some do, but they aren't doing it for the right reasons.) People don't try broadway to become famous. There aren't too many legitimately FAMOUS actors that work exclusively on B'way.
If we're not having fun, then why are we doing it? These are DISCUSSION boards, not mutual admiration boards. Discussion only occurs when we are willing to hear what others are thinking, regardless of whether it is alignment to our own thoughts.
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newintown
Broadway Legend
joined:3/3/10
"Take it up with your therapist. You're over-thinking this."

Interesting thought. Perhaps the sort of thing people who don't like to think at all often say.

You might consider the notion that a reductive sentence like "they enjoy getting an autograph from someone they admire" doesn't even begin to explore the question of "why" - no one was denying that autograph hounds enjoys getting an autograph; but there are people who like to delve a bit deeper and ask, "why do they enjoy getting an autograph?"

Of course, "why" can be a perplexing or terrifying question to some.
ghostlight2
Broadway Legend
joined:12/5/04
"Interesting thought. Perhaps the sort of thing people who don't like to think at all often say."

Bit of a dichotomy, that, isn't it?

"You might consider the notion that a reductive sentence like "they enjoy getting an autograph from someone they admire" doesn't even begin to explore the question of "why" - no one was denying that autograph hounds enjoys getting an autograph; but there are people who like to delve a bit deeper and ask, "why do they enjoy getting an autograph?" "

Or you could just recognize that people have been collecting souvenirs from pre-historic times and this is a modern example of that.

"Of course, "why" can be a perplexing or terrifying question to some."

I'd say if you're trying to insult me, try harder - but I wouldn't want you to hurt yourself. You've already strained your logic.

Updated On: 7/24/12 at 05:15 PM
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My Oh My
Broadway Legend
joined:6/29/07
"I think you nailed part of the problem. HERO. What is heroic about a broadway actor? (And you can fill in many professions that are now hailed as heroes -- Athletes, actors, chefs, blah, blah, blah.)

There are actors whose WORK I am in awe of, or a creative team that inspires me -- but those things are not heroic. We have a warped sense of that in this country."


Well in my teenaged mind, the original creative teams of say, Evita and Les Miserables were definitely heroic for having taken an art form I already loved and built upon it in interesting and often times innovative ways while still maintaining that essence that defines a traditional musical play. It is an over-the-top, over-enthusiastic term of endearment not meant to be taken literally. In my case, at least.
Recreation of original John Cameron orchestration to "On My Own" by yours truly. Click player below to hear.
bk
Broadway Legend
joined:7/20/03
The whole cult of stage dooring is one from the last decade, maybe a teeny bit before that. It's all the Internet generation, in any case. They can stage door, get their autograph, take their picture, and then come directly online and post about it. When I grew up in LA I was rather bold and would occasionally go to the stage door and ask if I could meet the star of the show. In every instance, there was NEVER EVER anyone else there, and I was always taken to the dressing room of the star and introduced to them. We'd have a chat and that would be that. I never asked for an autograph, and I met some really big stars. It was better then. Now it's a game and weird with barricades and security and I don't know why any actor who's just put out energy for two and a half hours should have to endure spending another thirty minutes just dealing with that insanity.
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Jane2
Broadway Legend
joined:2/13/04
Just as I don't know why people care who likes a show or doesn't, I don't know why anyone cares if someone stagedoors or not. How does it directly impact your life?

You (the generic you) shouldn't attempt to generalize why people stagedoor. There are many different reasons why they're there. And who cares? If they're having a good time, so what? I think those who are *so* bothered by this practice have more of a problem than a stagedoorer!

I bet if there were no people at the door when the cast exits, they would be disappointed.

I'm not a stagedoorer, but I like seeing a crowd outside waiting for the cast!
<-----craves juicy pizza
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dramamama611
Broadway Legend
joined:12/4/07
Words powerful, and the best thing about them: there's one for everything so that you CAN say what you actually mean. You don't get to use a word and give it its own meaning.
If we're not having fun, then why are we doing it? These are DISCUSSION boards, not mutual admiration boards. Discussion only occurs when we are willing to hear what others are thinking, regardless of whether it is alignment to our own thoughts.
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beltingbaritone
Broadway Star
joined:10/30/08
Jane...a-FREAKING-men!
Men don't even belt.
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My Oh My
Broadway Legend
joined:6/29/07
Excuse you? Now we're up-in-arms over a word? I haven't misused "heroic" in conversation before today in ages. I will use it now as much as humanly possible.

I'm messing with you. And I understand your frustration. I do my part by not promoting bastardization of the language to the kids at work. Lord knows the number of times I wish to tear my hair out due to some of the things kids say nowadays.

Recreation of original John Cameron orchestration to "On My Own" by yours truly. Click player below to hear.
Updated On: 7/24/12 at 07:16 PM
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orangeskittles
Broadway Legend
joined:1/8/05
Do you volunteer to work overtime for free EVERY shift? Do you think any casting agents ask actors if they stage door? It doesn't come into play when getting a job. If you are going to chose performers based on whether or not they stage door, why bother going to see the show...just become a stagedoor johnny.

Casting directors don't ask if they stage door, but the effect can trickle down. There are definitely actors who lose out on lead roles because they don't have a bankable name. If audiences don't want to pay money to see them in a show, they won't be cast. When the actor isn't Ricky Martin or Daniel Radcliffe, they have to work for that kind of recognition.

How do you think up and coming actors build up a fanbase? By sneaking out of a side door to rush back to Brooklyn every night, or taking a few minutes to acknowledge the people who are coming out to support their show? The actors may not owe fans an autograph, but fans don't owe the actors a purchase of a concert ticket or those crappy solo music CDs actors insist on putting out either.

I can't even think of the last time I stagedoored to see someone who wasn't an acquaintance and I couldn't care less about getting autographs, so this isn't a personal defense. I agree with Jane, I don't care what other fans choose to do and it has no impact on my life if they choose to spend hours waiting for an illegible Sharpie scribble. But to suggest there's no correlation between engaging with fans and becoming a successful performer (per dramamama's 2 goals) is not true.
Like a firework unexploded
Wanting life but never knowing how
Updated On: 7/25/12 at 07:28 PM