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Glasses Malone Pays Tribute to Four Decades of West Coast Rap on '6 N' the Mornin''

The project will include original Glasshouse favorites that will be available for the first time on DSPs.

Glasses Malone Pays Tribute to Four Decades of West Coast Rap on '6 N' the Mornin''

Today, Watts rapper Glasses Malone debuts "6 'N the Mornin' (GMX)", a reworking of Ice-T's foundational gangster rap cut. Produced by Ty Dolla $ign, the g-funk interpretation features slick new verses from Ice-T and Snoop Dogg and a boisterous hook by Ty Dolla $ign himself. "6 'N the Mornin' (GMX)" is the lead single from a reimagined version of Glasses' acclaimed 2012 Glasshouse mixtape available via Division Distribution this Spring. The project will include original Glasshouse favorites that will be available for the first time on DSPs along with brand new music featuring The Game, Too $hort, Raphael Saadiq, Schoolboy Q and more joining original guests E-40, Cypress Hill, Kurupt, Xzibit, Warren G, Kid Ink, Coolio and Tha Eastsidaz.

"Maya Angelou once said 'if you don't know where you've come from, you don't know where you're going,'" explains Glasses Malone. "As the last true essence of this west coast rap lineage, I want this project to connect the DNA. The history of The West. '6 'N the Mornin' (GMX)' is the start with 4 decades of West Coast artists coming together and putting on for the culture."

The single follows his jaw-dropping "2Pac Must Die," in which Glasses' tells the story of Tupac Shakur's death from the perspective of Compton Crip gang member Orlando "Baby Lane" Anderson, whom many believe shot and killed Tupac. "2Pac Must Die" became an Internet sensation, logging more than 5.1 million views and leading to Glasses Malone getting high profile interviews with The Breakfast Club and Big Boy, among others.

Glasses Malone knows how to make a statement. In July 2019, the Watts, California rapper released "2Pac Must Die" song and video, in which Glasses Malone tells the story of Tupac Shakur's death from the perspective of Compton Crip gang member Orlando "Baby Lane" Anderson, whom many believe shot and killed Tupac.

"2Pac Must Die" pushed Glasses Malone creatively, earning him one of the biggest songs of his career. "It's the only way I've ever been successful in life, when I took things into my own hands," Glasses Malone says. "It's what my mom raised me to be, a leader."

Growing up as a street-racing enthusiast in the gang-infested streets of Southern California, Glasses Malone focused on creativity early on. It was a way to express himself as he shuttled between Watts and Compton, became a gang member, dealt drugs, and endured his mother getting a 20-year federal prison sentence. He became a gear head, someone who studied cars as much as rap. Thus, it's no wonder several of his projects and songs have vehicular themes.

In his music, Glasses Malone's remarkable blend of street insight, social commentary, and lyricism earned him ringing endorsements from a series of rap icons, including JAY-Z and Dr. Dre. From there, Glasses Malone became a rap fixture thanks to a series of acclaimed mixtapes, including White Lightening. Glasses Malone was introduced in 2006 to Mack 10, who brought him to the Cash Money Records fold. Over the next several years, he released celebrated projects and was featured in 2018 on the Netflix show Fastest Car.

As he prepares for the release of his next project Glasshouse, Glasses Malone is readying three more albums for this year and establishing himself as an artist synonymous with creating innovative music, television, and film projects.

"I was bred by Birdman to run a record label," Glasses Malone says. "I was schooled by Mack 10 to understand what it would take to succeed from a musical and visual perspective, what it would need to look like. The right person was casted for this film."

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