AVENUE Q Articles
Click Here for More Articles on AVENUE Q...

'Avenue Q' on Tour: A Chat with Rob McClure

For a while, it looked like Avenue Q may never come our way.  Shortly after winning the 2004 Tony Award for Best Musical, it was announced that instead of a national tour, Avenue Q would open up shop in Las Vegas and stay put.  Open it did, but instead of staying there, producers decided the "little show that could" needed a broader audience.  But was middle America ready for puppets talking dirty, having sex, and have very real angst about being a grown up?  So far, that answer has been a resounding"yes", as the show has earned raves nationwide.  That tour stops for two weeks at Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre. 

Before the show arrived in Baltimore, I had the great fortune to ask Rob McClure, who plays both Princeton and Rod in the show a few questions about being a part of Q.  Here's what he had to say!

James Howard:  Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions, Rob.  You come to the touring company from the Broadway Company of Avenue Q.  What role(s) did you play there?  Is playing Broadway really a unique experience?

Rob McClure: I played Nicky and Trekkie Monster on Broadway before taking on Princeton/Rod on the 1st National Tour. Broadway is obviously a dream come true, but audiences everywhere continue to make performing a blast. From San Diego, to Des Moines, to Pittsburgh...if the audiences want a Broadway Show...then we'll give them a Broadway show. 

James: I'm sure you get asked this all the time, but what was the training like to learn to be a puppeteer AND a role?  Which came first, the puppet skills or the characters Rod/Princeton? 

Rob: The audition process for "Q" is intense. They really put you through the ringer. I had 8 callbacks, and 3 days of "Puppet Camp" before I landed Nicky/Trekkie on Broadway. I was always a big fan of the Muppets, but had no previous puppetry experience. Puppet camp truly redefined my preconceptions of puppetry... I'll never forget learning that before a puppet can speak...he has to inhale. It's those details that make the characters truly come to life. 

James: How much freedom were you and the rest of the cast given to create your own take on the characters?  Have you seen the other actors who have played Rod/Princeton – John Tartaglia, Barrett Foa, Howie Michael Smith?  If so, have they influenced your performance?

Rob: I was a HUGE fan of Avenue Q long before I ever dreamed of being a part of it. I saw it off-Broadway at the Vineyard, and waited at the stage door for autographs! So I have the utmost respect for all the people who have played these roles before me.  Johnny's comic timing...Barrett's expression... Howie's subtlety and masterful puppetry... However, you always have to make roles your own. I'm paid to tell a story...not do an imitation of John Tartaglia.  With that said...Avenue Q is a different beast. When I replaced Rick Lyon as Nicky/Trekkie, I did have freedom to rediscover, but the voices are clear parodies of children's television characters. So I definitely sounded like Rick as Nicky and Trekkie, not because I was imitating him, but because I was imitating the pop culture puppet icons that those characters HAVE to sound like for the audience to get the full effect of the joke. Does that make sense? 

James: Sure it does!  So, how much of Rob McClure is in Rod?  Princeton?

Rob: There is plenty of me in Princeton. I get teased a lot for my optimism. I get asked a lot about playing a gay character (Rod) as a straight guy. I approach him the same way I approach any character. He is someone who is desperately searching for love. Whether it's a Man, a Woman, a Monster? What's the difference? 

James: The Golden Theatre in New York City seems the ideal size for Avenue Q – it feels like the actors and the audiences are really close, and the communal feeling really works for the show.  Then there is the Hippodrome, a theatre that is probably three times the size of the Golden.  How has the show worked in larger venues?  Are the adjustments to your performance significant? 


Related Articles



Comment & Share




About Author

Subscribe to Author Alerts
James was first bitten by the theatre bug at the tender young age of 11, when, at the last minute, he was called upon to replace a classmate who, 42nd STREET-like, broke his leg, in a play, of all things, about the skeletal system! It was a trip to New York with his high school drama teacher to see Angela Lansbury in MAME that sealed his fate. As an actor, favorite roles include Sheridan Whiteside in THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER, Potiphar in JOSEPH..., Col. Pickering in MY FAIR LADY, and Sancho Panza?s ass in MAN OF LA MANCHA. After spending a summer feeling very conflicted playing both an apostle AND a high priest in JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, James' theatre career took a turn toward direction and design, including such varied productions as THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK, LOST IN YONKERS, GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER and GRAND HOTEL, SIDE SHOW, THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD and SWEENEY TODD. James holds a Bachelor's degree in English from Towson University, with additional course work in journalism, dramaturgy, scenic design and stage direction. He is living proof that you can be a devout Sondheim fan AND love MAMMA MIA!


 
🔀WASHINGTON, DC SHOWS
Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You  and  The Actor's Nightmare in Washington, DCSister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You and The Actor's Nightmare
(Runs 4/4 - 4/19)
In the Heights in Washington, DCIn the Heights
(Runs 5/1 - 5/3)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/1 - 5/3)
Camp David
(Runs 3/21 - 5/4)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/2 - 5/4)
The Addams Family
(Runs 5/1 - 5/4)
Monty Python's Spamalot
(Runs 5/1 - 5/4)

More Shows | Add a Show

Message Board

BWW BLOGS